Monthly Archives: January, 2013

Power Plant Safety as interpreted by Curtis Love – Repost

This is a repost and slightly edited from the original post that was originally posted on January 28, 2012:

I vividly remember four events while working at the power plant where I was at the brink of death.  I’m sure there were many other times, but these four have been etched in my memory almost 30 years later.  Of those four memorable events, Curtis Love was by my side (so to speak) to share the wonder of two of those moments.  This is a story about one of those times when you are too busy at the time to realize how close you came to catching that ride to the great power plant in the sky, until the middle of that night when you wake up in a cold sweat trying to catch your breath.

As I mentioned in an earlier post, safety is the number one priority at the power plant.  But what is safe and what isn’t is relative.  If you are the person that has to walk out onto a plank hanging out over the top ledge on the boiler in order to replace a section of boiler tube before the boiler has cooled down below 160 degrees, you might not think it is safe to do that with only an extra long lanyard tied to your waist and a sheer drop of 200 feet to the bottom ash hopper below (which I incidentally didn’t have to do as an electrician, but had to hear about after some other brave he-man had the privilege), you might not think that this is safe.  But the Equipment Support Supervisor who has spent too many years as an engineer behind his desk doesn’t see anything wrong with this as long as you don’t fall.  So, he tells you to do it, just don’t fall.

Safety is also relative to the date when something occurs.  In 1994 OSHA implemented new rules for confined spaces.  A confined space is any place that’s hard to enter and exit, or a place where you might be trapped in an enclosure because of converging walls.  So, before 1994, there were no safety rules specific to confined spaces.

No rules meant that when I was on labor crew it was perfectly safe to crawl into a confined space and wind and twist your way around obstacles until the small door that you entered (18 inches by 12 inches) was only a distant memory as you are lying down in the bottom section of the sand filter tank with about 22 inches from the bottom of the section to the top requiring you to lie flat as you drag yourself around the support rods just less than 2 feet apart.  Oh.  and wearing a sandblast helmet…

Sand Blast Helmet

Sand Blast Helmet

and holding a sandblaster hose…

Sand Blast Hose

Sand Blast Hose

with a straight through Sandblast Nozzle….

Sand Blast Nozzle

Sand Blast Nozzle

Which means, the person sandblasting has no way of turning off the sand or the air on their own.  If you wanted to turn off the sand, you had to bang the nozzle against the side of the tank and hope that the person outside monitoring the sandblaster was able to hear you above the roar of the Sandblaster and the Industrial Vacuum.

Sandblasting machine.  Would run about 15 minutes before it would run out of sand.

Sandblasting machine. Would run about 15 minutes before it would run out of sand.

and a drop light that left you all tangled in wires and hoses that blew air on your face so that you could breathe and a vacuum hose that sucked the blasted sand and rust away, while the sandblaster blasts away the rust from all things metal less than a foot away from your face, because the air is so full of dust, that’s as far as you can see while holding the drop light with the other hand next to the sandblast hose.  The air that blows through the sandblaster is hot, so you begin to sweat inside the heavy rain suit that you wear to protect the rest of you from sand that is ricocheting everywhere, but you don’t feel it as long as cool air is blowing on your face.

The week I spent lying flat trying to prop up my head while sandblasting the bottom section of both sand filter tanks gave me time to think about a lot of things…. which leads us to Curtis Love…. Not that it was Curtis Love that I was thinking about, but that he enters the story some time in the middle of this week.  When I least expected it.

Similar to these Sand Filters only about twice the size

Similar to these Sand Filters only about twice the size.  If you look closely you can see the seam around the bottom. Below that seam is where I was lying while sandblasting

Curtis Love was a janitor at the plant when I first joined the Sanitation Engineering Team after my four summers of training as a “summer help”.  Curtis was like my mother in some ways (and in other ways not – obviously).  He was always looking for something to worry about.  For instance, one Monday morning while we were sitting in our Monday Morning Janitor safety meeting and Pat Braden had just finished reading the most recent safety pamphlet to us and we were silently pondering the proper way to set the outriggers on a P&H Crane, Jim Kanelakos said, “Hey Curtis.  Don’t you have your mortgage at the Federal Bank in Ponca City?”  Curtis said, “Yeah, why?”  Jim continued, “Well I heard this morning on the news that the bank was foreclosing on all of their home mortgages.”

Curtis said that he hadn’t heard that, but that as soon as it was 9:00 he would call the bank to find out what he needed to do so that he wouldn’t lose his house.  About that time I gave a report on the number of fiddleback spiders I had killed in the main switchgear the previous week.  It seemed like no one was listening to my statistics as Doris Voss was still pondering the P&H Crane hand signals, and Curtis was shuffling his feet in worry and Ronnie Banks was staring off into space, as if he was stunned that Monday was already here again, and Jim Kanelakos was snickering under his breath.

When the meeting was over and we were standing up, Jim told Curtis, “Hey Curtis.  I was just kidding.  The bank really isn’t foreclosing on their mortgages.”  Curtis replied, “I don’t know.  I better call them to check anyway.”  Jim replied, “Curtis, I just made that up!  I was playing a joke on you.”  Curtis said, “I better check anyway, because it still is possible that they could be foreclosing on their mortgages”.  So Jim just gave up trying to explain.

I know you wouldn’t be able to tell by looking at me now, but there were only two of us at the plant that were small enough to crawl through the portal into the Sand Filter tanks (Ed Shiever and myself), because not only was it very tight, but the entry was so close to the edge of the building that you had to enter the hole by curving your body around the corner and into the tank.

I have tried to paint of picture of the predicament a person is in when they are laying in this small space about 20 feet from the small portal that you have to crawl through.  with their airline for the sandblast helmet, the sandblast hose, the drop light cord and the 4 inch vacuum hose all wound around the support rods that were not quite 2 feet apart in all directions.  Because this is where I was when without my giving the signal (by banging the sandblast nozzle on the tank three times), the sand stopped flowing from the nozzle and only air was hissing loudly.  This meant one of two things.  The sandblast machine had just run out of sand, or someone was shutting the sandblaster off because it was time for lunch.  I figured it was time for lunch, because I didn’t think it had been more than 10 minutes since the sand had been refilled and amid the roaring blasts and the howling sucking vacuum hose, I thought I had caught the sound of a rumbling stomach from time to time.

Industrial Vacuum used to suck out the sand as I was sandblasting

Industrial Vacuum used to suck out the sand as I was sandblasting

The next thing that should happen after the sand has blown out of the sandblast hose, is that the air to the sandblaster should stop blowing.  And it did…. but what wasn’t supposed to happen, that did, was that the air blowing through my sandblast hood allowing me to breathe in this sea of rusty dust shut off at the same time!  While still pondering what was happening, I suddenly realized that without the air supply to my hood, not only could I not breathe at all, but my sweat-filled rain suit that I was wearing suddenly became unbearably hot and dust began pouring into my hood now that the positive pressure was gone.

I understood from these various signs of discomfort that I needed to head back to the exit as quickly as possible, as I was forced by the thick dust to hold my breath.  I pulled my hood off of my head and everything went black.  I had moved more than a foot away from the drop light.  I knew that the exit was in the direction of my feet, so I swung around a row of support rods and dragged myself along by the rods as quickly as I could.  Working my way around the cable, the air hose, the sandblast hose and the vacuum hose as I pulled myself along trying to make out where the exit could be.  Luckily, I had figured correctly and I found myself at the exit where in one motion I pulled myself out to fresh air and the blinding light of the day.

Furious that someone had turned off my air, I ran out of the sand filter building to the sandblast machine where I found Curtis Love of all people.  Up to this point, Curtis had never had the privilege to operate the sandblaster and was not aware of the proper sequence to shutting down the machine…. without shutting off the air to my hood.  Incidentally, both the sandblaster and the air hose to the sandblast hood were being fed from the same regular plant air supply (which OSHA might have frowned upon back as far as 1983, and which caused you to blow black oily stuff out of your nose for a few days).

Needless to say, about the time that I came bolting out of the sand filter building Curtis had figured out that he had shut off the wrong valve.  He was apologizing profusely in one long drawn out sentence….. “Kevin, I’m sorry, I’m really sorry, I’m sorry, I’m really sorry….”  I stopped myself short as my hands were flying toward the area where his neck would have been, if Curtis had had a neck.  I looked over toward the crew cab parked nearby.  It was full of hungry labor crew “he-men in training” all smiling and chuckling.  At that moment I knew that both Curtis and I had been on the receiving end of what could be construed as a “power plant joke” (refer to the post about Gene Day to learn more about those).  So, I spent the next 30 seconds as Curtis and I piled into the crew cab telling Curtis that is was all right, he didn’t have to feel bad about it.  Evidently, someone had told Curtis how to shutdown the sandblaster, but failed to tell  him exactly which valve to turn off when turning off the air to the sandblaster.

Needless to say.  Lunch tasted extra good that day.  Possibly the rusty dust added just the right amount of iron to my sandwich.

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Rivers and the Rose in the Power Plant Palace

When is the appropriate time to call 911?  Calling 911 in the Power Plant is when you call the Shift Supervisor to report something important.  As Randy Dailey, our Safety Trainer extraordinaire, always taught us, first tap the person on the shoulder and say, “Are you all right?”  Then you point you finger at someone and say, “Call 911!”  That’s called “Activating the EMS”  (Emergency Medical System).  Besides medical emergencies, there are other reasons to call the Shift Supervisor.

I learned early on to ‘fess up when you have done something wrong.”  People appreciate it when you tell them up front that you goofed.  That way the problem can be dealt with directly.  Dee Ball was that way.  Any time he wrecked a truck, he didn’t hesitate to tell his boss.  So, even as a summer help I had developed this philosophy.  Never be afraid to expose your blunders.  It works out better in the long run.

One example of someone not following this philosoply was Curtis Love.  As I mentioned in the post Power Plant Spider Wars and Bugs in the Basement, Curtis didn’t want to tell anyone that he had been bitten by a brown recluse for the third time because he was afraid of losing his job.

The Oklahoma house spider -- The Brown Recluse

The Oklahoma house spider — The Brown Recluse

His philosophy came back to bite him a year and a half later when he was on the labor crew when he was the designated truck driver.  I had moved on to the electric shop by this time.

A red crew cab like this only the bed of the truck was longer

A red crew cab like this only the bed of the truck was longer

He was backing up the crew cab around a corner under the Fly Ash hoppers up at the coalyard when the side of the crew cab came into contact with one of those yellow poles designed to protect the structure from rogue vehicles.  Unfortunately.  This created a dent in the side of the truck.

An example of yellow poles protecting an area

An example of yellow poles protecting an area

Curtis, already on probation. worried that he would be fired if he told anyone about this mishap, failed to tell Larry Riley about this incident.  Larry, on the other hand, was standing in front of the Coalyard Maintenance shop (the labor crew home), and saw the entire incident.  At that moment, he turned to one of the labor crew hands and said, “I hope Curtis comes over here and tells me about that.”  Unfortunately, Curtis decided to act as if nothing had happened.  This resulted in his termination.  As much as I cared about Curtis, I must admit that the Power Plant scene was probably not the best location for his vocation.

I had seen Dee Ball do the same thing over and over again, and he always reported his accidents immediately.  He was never punished for an accident, though, for a number of years, he was banned from driving a truck.  You can read more about this in the post:  Experiencing Maggots, Mud and Motor Vehicles with Dee Ball.

One day during the summer of 1984 just after lunch, 1A PA fan tripped (PA stands for Primary Air).  When this happened, number one unit had to lower it’s output from over 500 Megawatts down to around 200.  The trip indicator on the 6900 volt breaker said that it had been grounded.  Being grounded means that one of the three phases of the motor or cable had made a circuit with the ground (or something that was grounded).  The trip circuits shut the fan down so fast that it prevents an explosion and saves the fan from being destroyed.

Diana Lucas (later Diana Brien), Andy Tubbs and I were given the task of finding the ground and seeing what we could do to fix it.  We unwired the motor, which was no easy task, because the motor is about the size of a large van, and about 10 times heavier.

This is about 1/2 the size of the PA fan motor

This is about 1/2 the size of the PA fan motor which is 1000  horsepower

So, we spent the rest of the day unwiring the motor (in the rain), and unwiring the cable to the motor from the breaker in the main switchgear and testing both the motor and the cable with various instruments looking for the grounded wire or coil that caused the motor to trip.  We used a large “Megger” on the motor.   It’s called a Megger because it measures Mega-Ohms.  So, it’s technically called a Mega-Ohm meter.  Ohms is a measurement of resistance in an electrical circuit.  We usually use a small hand cranked megger, that is similar to an old hand crank telephone that generates a high voltage (good for shocking fish in a lake to make them rise to the surface).  In the case of the hand cranked Megger, it would generate 1,000 volts.

A Hand cranked Megger made by the same company, only newer than the ones we had

A Hand cranked Megger made by the same company, only newer than the ones we had

The Megger this size would have been useless with this large motor.  Instead we used one that was electric, and you ran the voltage up over 10,000 volts and watched the mega-ohms over a period of 1/2 hour or so.

For the cables, we hooked up a Hypot (or Hipot).  This stands for High Potential.  Potential in this case is another word for “Voltage”.  It would charge up and then you pressed a button and it would send a high voltage pulse down the cable, and if there is a weak spot in the insulation,The Hypot will find it.  So, we hooked a Hypot up to the cable and tried to find the grounded wire.  No luck.

After spending 4 hours looking for the grounded cable or motor, we found nothing.  We spent another hour and a half putting the motor and the breaker back in service.  The Fan was put back into operation and we went home.  As I was walking out to the car with Bill Rivers, he told me, “I knew they weren’t going to find anything wrong with that fan.” He had a big grin on his face.

At first I thought he was just making an educated guess as Rivers was apt to do on many occasions (daily).  It was raining and I could see where water may have been sucked into the motor or something and had momentarily grounded the motor.  Just because we didn’t find anything didn’t mean that the breaker didn’t trip for no reason.

When we were in the car and on our way to Stillwater, Oklahoma with Yvonne Taylor and Rich Litzer, Bill explained that he knew why the motor tripped.  He had been walking through the main switchgear with Mike Rose, and Mike, for no apparent reason other  than curiosity, had opened up the bottom door to the breaker for 1A PA fan.  He looked at it for a moment and then slammed the door shut.  When he did this, the breaker tripped.

So, the ground relay happened to be the one that tripped.  It might as well been an over-current or a low voltage trip.  It just happened to trip the ground trip.  Bill said that he told Mike that he should call the Shift Supervisor and let him know so they could restart the motor.  Mike on the other hand told Bill that he was already on probation and was afraid of losing his job if he reported that he had slammed the door on the breaker and tripped the fan.

If there was ever a reason to call 911, it was then.  All he had to do was tell them, “I accidentally tripped the PA fan when I bumped the breaker cabinet.”  They would have told him to reset the flag, and they would have started the fan right back up.  No questions asked… I’m sure of it.  And they wouldn’t have lost their generating capacity for the remainder of the afternoon and we wouldn’t have spent 4 hours unwiring, testing and rewiring the motor in the rain with a plastic umbrella over our head.

Bill wasn’t about to tell on Mike.  If Mike didn’t want to report it, Bill wasn’t going to say anything, and I understand that.  I probably would have kept it to myself at the time if I was in Bill’s shoes (I’m just glad I wasn’t because I probably wouldn’t have been able to sleep soundly for the next year).  But 30 years later, I might write about it in a Blog.  Even though I wouldn’t have looked to Mike to teach me much about being an electrician (he was more of an Air Condition man anyway), I still loved the guy.

Mike died almost two years ago on May 29, 2011.  He was from England and had lived in Canada for a time.  He used to work on trains.  Trains, even though they are diesel, are really electric.  The Diesel engine really runs a generator that generates electricity that runs the train.  I know that Mike was a good man at heart.  He loved his family with all his heart.  Here is a picture of the Limey:

Mike Rose.  A fair plant electrician, but a great family man!

Mike Rose. A fair plant electrician, but a great family man!

Ok.  So I know what you are thinking….  There must be a story about myself in here somewhere.  Well, you would be right.  First of all.  I always ‘fessed up to my mistakes, as my current manager at Dell knows well (yes.   I still mess up after all these years).  I told my current manager the other day that CLM was my middle name.  (CLM means “Career Limiting Move”).  So here is my power plant “mess up” story (well one of them):

In January 1986, I returned from my Honeymoon with my new wife Kelly when I found that we had hired a new electrician.  Gsry Wehunt was replacing Jim Stephenson who had left the plant on February 15, 1985, which is a story all it’s own.  We had just started an overhaul on Unit 1.

I remember the first Monday I spent with Gary.  It was January 6, 1986 and we were working on cleaning out the exciter house on the end of the main power generator with Diana Brien (formerly Diana Lucas).   We were discussing salaries and Gary was surprised to find out that I was making more than he was.  Well… I had been an electrician for over 2 years and had been promoted regularly…. so I didn’t think there was anything strange about it, except that I still looked like I was only about 18 years old (even though I was 25) and Gary was about 34.  I had already been promoted 4 times and my salary had gone from $7.15 to over $12 an hour.

Anyway, when that first Friday rolled around, Gary and I were assigned to Substation Inspection.  Some later time I may go into the details of what “Substation Inspection” entails,  but for now, let’s just stick with my “911 call.”  It is enough to say that we were in the main plant substation relay house on Friday January 10, 1986 at 9:00 am.  One of our jobs was to call other substations and perform a test called a “Transfer Trip and Carrier Test”.  We had called Woodring Substation (Woodring is a town in Oklahoma and we had a 345 KV line going there), and I was talking to the man in the substation on the other end of the phone line.

At the same time I was showing Gary just how experienced I was at being an electrician.  People had told me that you had to be a plant electrician for 5 years before you really became a “first class” electrician.  Well.  Here I was at 2 years, and I thought I was so good that I could do anything by now….  — Yeah… right.  I told the guy on the other end of the line as I turned a switch…. Amber light… Back to Blue…. and I wrote down the value on the meter (paperwork… oh yes…. it’s that important.  Like A-1 sauce).

Then I reached for the second switch.  I said, “Carrier test”, then turned the switch.  The lights in the relay house went out and we were in the dark.  I told the guy on the other end of the line….. “Well.  That’s not supposed to happen.”  Then as I let go of the switch and it returned to it’s normal position, the lights turned back on.  Okay……

I wrote the numbers down from the meter and said goodbye to the other faceless substation man on the other end of the line that I talked to over 100 times, but never met in person.  He sounded like a nice guy.  Then I headed for the gray phone.  I heard the Shift Supervisor paging Leroy Godfrey (The Electrical Supervisor) on line 2 (we had 5 Gray phone lines.  The Gray Phone was our PA system).

When I picked up the line I heard Leroy pick up the phone and the Shift Supervisor tell Leroy that we just lost station power in the main substation and it had switched over to Auxiliary power.  I immediately jumped in and said, “Jim (for Jim Padgett, the Shift Supervisor), I did that.  I was performing a Carrier test with Woodring and the moment I performed the carrier test the lights went out.”  Leroy chimed in by saying, “That wouldn’t cause you to lose station power.”

Well, in my ‘inexperienced’ plant electrician way, I responded, “Well.  All I know is that when I turned the switch to perform the carrier test, the lights went out, and when I let go of the switch, the lights came back on.”  Leroy reiterated, “That wouldn’t cause you to lose station power.”  I replied with, “I’m just saying….” and left it at that.  I had done my job.  They knew I was out here.  They knew I had called 911 right away.  I explained what I was doing…. they could take it from there.

I had hoped that I had showed Gary upfront that it doesn’t hurt to report your mistakes (even though I hadn’t made one as far as I could tell), but I was 100% sure I had done something to cause the relay house to lose power.  Though, I couldn’t figure out why.

After lunch, Bill Bennett, our A foreman came down to the shop to tell me that they figured out how the substation lost station power.  He said that a road grader had been grating  the road down by the Otoe-Missouri reservation (which is actually called “Windmill road”  I guess because there is a windmill down that road somewhere), and had hit an electric pole and knocked it over and had killed the power to the substation.

Substation Power Interrupting Road Grader

Substation Power Interrupting Road Grader

It turned out that the substation relay house was fed by a substation down that road where we have a radio tower.  So, think about this.  The exact time that I turned that switch in the substation, a road grater 2 1/2 miles away hits a telephone pole accidentally and knocks it to the ground and kills the power to the substation at the exact same time that I am performing a transfer-trip and Carrier test with Woodring Substation, and the time it takes to switch to auxiliary power is the exact time it took me to let go of the switch.

Don’t tell me that was by accident.  I will never believe it.  I think it was for the soul purpose of teaching me a useful lesson or two.  First….. don’t be afraid to tell someone when you do something wrong.  Second…. If you think you have control over the things that happen to you in your life… well, think again…… Third….. God watches you every moment, and if you let him, he will guide you to do the right thing when the time comes.

God bless you all.

Bob Lillibridge Meets the Boiler Ghost — Repost

This is a repost of a story that was Posted on January 21, 2012.  I rewrote it slightly and added a story to the bottom of it.  Everything past the poem is new.

When I worked on the labor crew we used to have a lot of fun cleaning out the boiler.  Especially the economizer section where we had that three foot crawl space in the middle where you had to lie flat with a the hydraulic spreaders and the four inch vacuum hose trying to suck out the chunks of ash clinkers before the crawl space filled up with ash.  After lying around in this wonderful environment for a day or so, one begins to look around for something to break the drone of the sucking sound of the vacuum and the swishing sound of the crosscut saws welded end on end as they rose and fell in a rhythmic beat propelled by Labor Crew He-men ten feet above this large bundle of Economizer tubes.

Bob Lillibridge was never in a bad mood when it came to cleaning the boiler.  His thin physique allowed him easy access to the crawl space.  The wild glare in his eye and cigarette smile kept everyone guessing what he would do next.  The texture of Bob’s face was like those bikers that have spent too many hours riding their Harleys through the desert without wearing a helmet.

Ok.  I'm over exagerating.  Bob didn't have this many wrinkles

Ok. I’m over exaggerating. Bob didn’t have this many wrinkles

He was especially cheerful when we were able to work in the Economizer crawl space with Ronnie Banks.  Ronnie Banks, unlike Bob was not wiry.  His stature was more like a thin black bear standing on his hind legs.  He sort of walked that way too.  I developed a song when Ronnie Banks and I worked together that went to the tune of the Lone Ranger theme (the William Tell Overture), that consisted of saying his name rapidly over and over again (like: Ronnie Banks Ronnie Banks Ronnie Banks Banks Banks).  It felt good to say, and it seemed to amuse Ronnie Banks.

Bob on the other hand knew that Ronnie was highly claustrophobic.  So, he would let Ronnie crawl through the too small hole into the boiler, then would crawl in after him.  After they were in the boiler far enough, Bob would grab both of Ronnie’s legs and hug them as hard as he could.  This would send Ronnie into a Claustrophobic seizure where he would flail himself around wildly yelling unrecognizable words such as “Blahgruuuee” and “uuunnnhh-ope” and other similar pronunciations.  I think Bob Lillibridge just liked to hear Ronnie Banks speaking in tongues.  I have to admit it did give you a strange sort of spiritual high when you saw the smile of pure satisfaction on Bob’s face as his body flew by while he was hugging Ronnie’s legs that were spinning and twirling all round a crawl space that was only three feet high.

I think it was these kind of spiritual moments that gave me the dream to write a story about the day that Bob Lillibridge met the Boiler Ghost.  It went like this:

The Boiler Ghost

From the darkness of the boiler it came.

The Boiler Ghost, black, enormous, full of hate.

I watched with disbelief as it edged its way along.

Its eyes, red and piercing, with a stare of terror

It glanced first this way and then that.

As its eyes passed through me I was filled with

Such a terrible fright that I felt near the point of death.

The massive head hung down between two pointed

Shoulder blades vulture-like.

The most terrifying thing of all was the gaping mouth

That hung open.

It was full of such a terrible darkness,

So dark and evil as if it were the gates of Hell.

Just then I noticed its eyes had fixed on Bob.

Bob Lillibridge.

He was pressed against the wall by the piercing stare,

His mouth open wide as if to scream.

Eyes bulging out in utter terror.

Mindless with pure fright.

I tried to scream, but felt such a choking force

I could make no noise.

With steady movement the monster advanced toward Bob.

Bob was white as ash staring into that dark empty mouth.

Smoke poured out of a flat nose on that horrid face.

It reached out a vile and tremendous hand

And grabbed Bob,

Who burst into flames at his touch.

In one movement he was gone.

Vanished into the mouth of pure darkness.

The Evil Ghost glanced first this way, then that,

And into the darkness of the boiler it went.

All was quiet,

The roar of the boiler told me I was safe once again.

Until the boiler ghost should decide to return.

I showed this poem to Bob after I had written it down.  He chuckled a little, but didn’t seem too amused by it.  Actually he looked a little worried. 

Some time after I had written this poem and was actually on the labor crew (I was on loan while I was a janitor when we were cleaning the economizer), we were in the bottom ash hopper at the bottom of the #2 boiler while it was offline.  There are two hoppers side-by-side, and we were breaking up some hard clinkers that had built up in there.  I had climbed over the one hopper where we were entering the hoppers to check something out, when all of the sudden someone started sandblasting the other hopper.

Now, these hoppers are quite large and you would have thought that someone sandblasting over on the other hopper wouldn’t really bother you if you were over in the other hopper, but I can assure you, that isn’t the case.  As I was only wearing a t-shirt and jeans, when the sandblast hose started blowing out sand, before I could climb over the hopper to try to escape, I was being pelted by sand.

It felt as if someone was just aiming the sandblast hose over the top of the hopper toward me.  I searched around the hopper to find a place where I was being pelted the least, and then I just crouched there with my face against the side of the hopper to protect it.  Finally after 10 to 15 minutes (though it seemed more like an hour), the sandblast hose was turned off, and I was able to climb over the hopper and out the portal to fresh air.

I don’t think anyone even realized I was over in the other hopper when they decided to turn the sandblast hose on.  I just climbed out of there and went about my business just slightly bruised all over from being blasted by sand.  — It didn’t occur to me until just now that this is the hopper where I  had seen the Boiler Ghost climb out, and Bob was there that day, and may have even been the person holding the sandblast hose…

Later Bob was able to move off of the labor crew. I think he went to the welding shop. Then later during the 1987-88 reshuffle, I think he was told that he was going to have to go back to the labor crew, and that was too much for him after being on the crew so long before being able to move off. So, he left. I never knew for certain what happened to Bob. I think he still lives somewhere around Pawnee, Oklahoma.

Learnin’ ’bout ‘lectricity with Andy Tubbs

The day I became an electrician at the coal-fired power plant, I suddenly became an expert in electricity.  I think it was on Tuesday, just one day after joining the electric shop that I was walking through the welding shop when someone stopped me and asked me how they would wire their living room with different light switches at different corners and make it work correctly.  As if I had been an electrician for years.  Luckily I  was just finishing a house wiring course at the Indian Meridian Vo-Tech in Stillwater, Oklahoma and they had us figure out problems just like those.

Within the first week, George Alley brought a ceiling fan to the shop that he had picked up somewhere and was wondering if we could get it to work.  My foreman Charles Foster thought it would be a good small project for me to work on to help me learn about electrical circuits.  After all, this ceiling fan could go slow, medium and fast, and it could go forward or reverse.  Only at the moment, all it would do was sit there and hum when you hooked up the power.  — So that was my first “unofficial” project, since the main goal was to make George happy so that he would help us out when we needed something special from the mechanics.

When I was a janitor, I had observed the electricians preparing to go to work in the morning, and often, one of them would go to the print cabinets at one end of the shop and pull out a blue print and lay it across the work table and study it for a while.  Then they would either put it back or fold it and put it in their tool bucket and head out the door to go do a job.  Now, it was my turn.

Andy Tubbs was one of the two people that played the best jokes on me when I was a janitor.  Larry Burns was the other person, and he was the person I was replacing as he had moved to another plant.  Andy was the one that had taken the handle off of my push broom the moment I had my back turned so that when I turned around to grab my broom, only the broom head was on the floor, while the broom handle was across the counter by the lab, and Andy was across the other side of the room trying to act like he wasn’t paying attention, but with an expression like he had just played a darn good joke.  — I actually had to go back into the bathroom I was cleaning so that I could laugh out loud.  I was really impressed by Andy’s ability to play a good joke.

While I’m on the subject, shortly after I became an electrician, I was sitting in the electric shop office talking to Charles when he stopped and said, “Wait…. Listen….”  We paused, waiting for something….  A few seconds later, the sound of a hoot owl came over the PA system (what we called the “Gray Phone”).  Charles said,  It’s an interesting coincidence that the only time the perfect sound of a hoot owl comes over the Gray Phone is when Andy Tubbs is riding in an elevator by himself or with a close friend.

Gaitronics Gray Phone

Gaitronics Gray Phone

I had been sent with Andy Tubbs and Diana Lucas (later Diana Brien), to go to the coal yard and figure out why some circuit for the train gate was not working.  Andy had pulled out the blueprints and was studying them.  I came up alongside him and looked at all the blue lines running here and there with circles with letters and numbers, and what I recognized as open and closed switches….

Here is a simple electric circuit drawn in the style of many of the electric blueprint drawings

Here is a simple electric circuit drawn in the style of many of the electric blueprint drawings

Andy stopped and gave me a momentary lecture on the nature of electricity.  It was so perfectly summed up, that for years whenever I thought about the nature of electricity, I always began with remembering what Andy told me.  He said this:

“Think of electricity like water in a hose.  Voltage is the water pressure.  Amperage is the amount of water going through the hose.  You can have the nozzle on the end of the hose shut off so that no water is coming out and then you have no amperage, but you will still have the pressure as long as it is turned on at the source so you will still have voltage.  In these diagrams, you just have to figure out how the water is going to get from one side to the other.  These circles are things like relays or lights or motors.  When the electricity makes it through them, they turn on as long as the electricity can make it all the way to the other side.”

That was it!  That was my lesson in ‘lectricity.  All I needed to know.  The blueprints were big puzzles.  I loved working puzzles.  You just had to figure out how you were going to get something to run, and that meant that certain relays had to pickup to close switches that might pick up other relays to close other switches. I found that most of the electricians in the shop were good at working all sorts of puzzles.

Andy went to the cabinet and grabbed one of the Simpson multimeters and a handset for a telephone that had red and black wires wrapped around it.

A telephone handset that looked like this, only it had a battery taped to it, and two leads coming out the bottom

A telephone handset that looked like this, only it had a battery taped to it, and two leads coming out the bottom

I was puzzled by this at first.  I thought I would just wait to see what we did with it instead of ask what it was for.  We grabbed our tool buckets (which also doubled as a stool and tripled as a trash can as needed), and put them in the substation truck.  The other truck was being manned by the designated electrician truck driver for that week.  We needed a truck that we could drive around in without having to hold up the truck driver.

We drove to the coalyard and went into the dumper switchgear.  Andy and Diane opened up a large junction box that was full of terminal blocks with wires going every which way in an orderly fashion.  They located a couple of wires, and Andy unwrapped the wires from the handset while Diane removed the screws holding the wires to the terminal block.  Then Andy clipped one wire from the handset to each of the two wires and handed me the phone.

Diane told me that they were going to drive down toward the train gate where the railroad tracks come into the plant and try to find these wires on the other end.  So, what they needed me to do was to talk on the phone so when they find my voice, they will know that they  have the right wires.  Diane said, “Just say anything.”  Then they left the switchgear and I could hear them drive away in the truck.

Well.  This was my opportunity to just talk to no one for a while without interruption.  How many times do you get to do that in one day?  Probably only when you are on the way to work and back again if you aren’t carpooling with anyone.  So, I just kicked into Ramblin’ Ann mode and let myself go.  I believe my monologue went something like this:

“The other day I was walking through a field, and who should I run across, but my old friend Fred.  I said, ‘Well, Hi Fred, how is it going?’ and Fred told me that he was doing just fine, but that he had lost his cow and was wondering if I could help him look for it.  I told him I couldn’t right now because I was helping some people find a wire at the moment, and if I became distracted, we might not only lose the cow, but we might lose the wires as well, so I better just keep on talking so that my friends on the other end can find the wires they are looking for. After that I went to the store and I picked up three cans of peas.  I thought about getting four cans of peas but settled on three and brought them to the checkout counter, and while I was waiting in line I noticed that the little boy in front of me with his mom was looking at me as if he wanted to have one of my cans of peas, so I quickly made it clear to him that I was buying these cans of peas for myself by sliding them further away from him and glaring at him.  Luckily the boy wasn’t persistent otherwise I would have broken down and given him a can of peas because he was looking kind of hungry and I was feeling sorry for him, though, I didn’t want him to know how I was feeling, so I put on a grim expression….”

Needless to say… My monologue went on for another 15 minutes.  Yes… .15 minutes.  I had expected Andy and Diane to have returned earlier, but I didn’t know how hard it was going to be to find the other end of the wires, so I just kept on ramblin’ to the best of my ability.  It’s like what it says in the Bible.  If we wrote down everything I said, it would have filled many volumes.  Being a Disciple of Ramblin’ Ann came in handy that day.  For more about Ramblin’ Ann, you can read the following post:

Ed Shiever Trapped in a Confined Space With A Disciple of Ramblin’ Ann

When Andy and Diane returned they said that they had found the wires right away, but that they had sat there for a while just listening to me ramble.  They said I was cracking them up.  They also mentioned that they thought I was completely crazy.  Well.  I was glad that they found the wires and that my rambling abilities had come in handy.

Five months after I had joined the electric shop, Andy and I were sent to Oklahoma City to learn about a new kind of electric troubleshooting.  It was called “Digital Electronics”.  I had just finished my electronics class at the Vo-Tech, and so I was eager to put it into practice.  Andy and I went to a two day seminar where we learned to troubleshoot what was basically a PC motherboard of 1984.  We used a special tool called a digital probe and learned how the processor worked with the memory chips and the bios.  It wasn’t like a motherboard is today.  It was simple.

A simple Motherboard like this

A simple Motherboard like this

It was just designed for the class so that we could use the digital probe to follow the different leads from the chips as the electric pulses turned on and off.

We were using digital probes similar to this

We were using digital probes similar to this

At the time I was thinking that this was a waste of time.  I had been learning all about troubleshooting electronic circuits from Bill Rivers and Sonny Kendrick.  I couldn’t see how this was going to be useful.  I didn’t know that within a couple of years, most of our electronic circuits in the precipitator controls were all going to be replaced with digital controls, and this was exactly what I was going to need to know.

So, Andy and I spent two days learning  all the basics of how new computers were going to be working.  This was the same year that Michael Dell was beginning his new computer company further down I-35 in Austin Texas.  Who would have thought that 18 years later I would be working for Dell.  But that’s another lifetime away…

Power Plant Humor and Joking with Gene Day – Repost

This is a revised version of a post that was originally posted on 1/14/2012.  I am reposting last years posts each Tuesday.

What sets power plant men apart from your regular mechanic, lineman or men of other occupations is that they are a semi-captive group of people with a lot of freedom to move about the plant and the plant grounds.  This provides for the opportunity to play jokes on each other without resorting to “horseplay”.  There is no room for horseplay at a power plant.  The power plant man lives among dangerous equipment, poisonous chemicals, carcinogenic dust, asbestos gloves and purely evil plant managers who would love to catch one of his minions engaging in horseplay.

The more elaborate yet simple joke seems to have the best effect on those who find themselves the victim.  First of all, the joke must be essentially harmless.  That is, no one is left injured (this rule seems to be more of a suggestion since I seemed to end up on the short end of the stick a few times).  Secondly,  the longer the joke takes to completion, the better.  If the joke goes on for a week or longer, then the final impact of the joke is much greater.  For instance.  A person that you are going to play a joke on sits in a chair that is raised an lowered by turning the chair upside down and twisting the wheel bracket around (which is how you lowered office chairs before the fancier spring and air cushioned chairs arrived).  Say you were to gradually lower a person’s chair each day by 1/8 of an inch or so.  Eventually, in a couple of weeks, the person will be sitting lower and lower at their desk until one day they get frustrated at sitting so low that they turn their chair over and raise the chair higher.  But each day, you keep lowering the chair by just a little bit until they are sitting so low again that they complain about it again and raise the chair up.  This can go on indefinitely.  The more people that know the joke is being played, the better in this instance.

The first time I met Gene Day, I knew that he was someone that would be fun to play jokes on.  I don’t know what it was about him exactly.  It wasn’t that he appeared to have a lower IQ.  On the contrary.  He seemed to be very knowledgeable as Control Room operators go.  Maybe it was because he seemed like a happy person that took most things rather lightly.  He wouldn’t be the type of person that would hold something against you just because you made him look foolish in front of his peers.  It seemed like the first time I noticed Gene Day, he was standing in the Control Room and I gave him a look like I was suspicious of him and he returned the look with one that said that he knew that I might be the type of person that would play a joke on him.  This surprised me, because I thought I had masked that look pretty well.

Gene Day is the one standing on the right with the Orange shirt.

Gene Day is the one standing on the right with the Orange shirt.  See what I mean about he has a face that says it would be great to play a joke on him?

Throughout my 20 years of power plant life I played many jokes on Gene Day, and each time it seems that I was throttled to the edge of extinction, which meant that I had executed the joke perfectly.  It seemed that each person had a different way of expressing their joy of finding out that they have been the victim of a power plant joke.

My favorite Gene Day joke was not one that took a long time to execute, and from the time that I conceived the idea to the time that I was being strangled by Gene Day was a mere 15 hours.

It began when I was driving home from work one day on my way down Sixth Street in Stillwater Oklahoma where I lived on the west end of town at the time.  Gene Day was an operator and their shift was over an hour and a half before the rest of the plant.  As I drove down Sixth Street about a block ahead of me, I saw Gene Day’s truck pull away from the Rock House Gym travelling in the same direction.  Gene had a black pickup with flames on the side…. Something left over from High School I think…  The only one in town like it.

Gene Day's truck was similar to this only different, with a different pattern of flames and a newer type of truck

Gene Day’s truck was similar to this only different, with a different pattern of flames and a newer type of truck

I kept an eye on his truck to see where he went, and as he passed the Stillwater Hospital he pulled into an Eye Clinic and parked in the parking lot.   I drove on past and pulled into my driveway about 3 blocks further on.  As I checked my mail I decided to go to the bank to deposit some checks I had received.  I returned to my car and pulled my car out of the driveway and headed back into town.

Gene Day turned onto Sixth Street in front of me again as he left the Eye Clinic and proceeded to go down Sixth street in front of me.  So again I watched him to see where he went.  Just as I came to Duck Street, I saw Gene Day pull his truck into the Simon’s Gas Station on the corner of Duck and Sixth.  He had pulled his truck up to the garage instead of the pumps, so I figured that he was getting his truck inspected.  I turned on Duck street to go to the bank drive-thru about a block away from the gas station.

After taking care of my banking business, I left the bank and headed back home toward Sixth Street.  I arrived at the corner of Sixth Street just in time to see Gene Day pulling out of the gas station and heading off in the opposite direction.  I thought that he hadn’t been at the gas station very long so he probably had just had his truck inspected.

The next morning when I arrived at the plant I walked by Gene Day’s truck on the way to the electric shop and I looked to see if he had a new Safety Inspection sticker.  He didn’t have any Safety Inspection sticker which meant that his truck had failed the inspection.

Armed with this information when I arrived in the electric shop I took out a yellow pad of paper and proceeded to write the following:

Private Investigator’s Notes for Gene Day:

Date:  5/14/91

3:05  Gene Day leaves work.

3:45 Gene Day arrives at Rockhouse Gym where he works out with a young college coed named Bunny.

5:05 Gene Day leaves Rockhouse Gym.

5:07 Gene Day arrives at Cockrell Eye Care Center  where he meets with a nurse in his pickup truck in the parking lot.

5:20 Gene Day leaves Eye Care Center.

5:25 Gene Day arrives at Simon’s Garage at the corner of Sixth and Duck and has them clean his pickup seats to remove the perfume scent.  While he was there, he tried to have his pickup inspected, but it didn’t pass inspection.

5:33 Gene Day leaves Simon’s Garage and goes home.

I folded the paper in half and after I began work, I headed to the Control Room to see how the Electrostatic Precipitator was doing.  I sat at the computer by the Control Room door that opened up to the Turbine Generator room.  After a while Gene Day walked by on his way to pick up the mail from the front office.  I waited about 30 seconds and followed him out onto the Turbine Generator (T-G) floor.  The T-G floor at Sooner Plant is painted bright red and the floor is kept clean so that the lights overhead reflect off of the floor.

This is a picture of the red turbine room floor, only not with the nice wax job

This is a picture of the red turbine room floor

The Control Room is halfway across this large room about 200 yards long.  The office area is at one end.   I walked over to the door that leads to the Office area and laid the half folded paper in the middle of the floor.   I figured that Gene wouldn’t be able to resist picking it up to see what it said.  Then I went back to the Control Room and leaned against one of the big blue monitors used by the Control Room Operators to view alarms.

After a few minutes, Gene Day walked into the Control room.  In one arm he carried various parcels of mail.  In the other hand, he was carrying the yellow paper I had left for him to find.  He was violently shaking it at me yelling, “How did you do this?!?!”  I acted surprised as if I didn’t know what he was talking about.  Somehow he figured I was behind this, but for the life of me.  I don’t know why….  He tried to explain to me that he had stopped to see his wife who is a nurse at the Cockrell Eye Care Clinic, and that there wasn’t any girl named Bunny.  He couldn’t figure out how I would know that he tried to get his truck inspected and it failed inspection….  I insisted that I didn’t know what he was talking about.  About that time, the room became blurry as my head was shaking back and forth, and I came to the realization that this joke had been performed perfectly.

Singing Along With Sonny Kendrick

Today I sit quietly in a cubicle with a group of other people on my team.  We each type away throughout the day, or we are on calls in our own meetings listening to conversations where we offer input where it is necessary.  I may listen to music on my computer to help me get into the rhythm of my work as I type away creating documents or sending IMs to other employees as they ask me questions throughout the day.

That was not how it was before the PC made inroads into our lives.  We used to sit around and talk to each other.  We did things to pass the time while we worked on tedious jobs.  We talked about our families.  We talked about movies and shows we had seen.  We asked each other how their family was doing.  Sometimes, we even sang.

I was sitting on the Precipitator Roof installing a new Rapper circuit board in the Rapper Vibrator cabinet while one of my Precipitator Mentors sat behind me making sure that I was learning the fine art of Precipitator Maintenance on one of the first actual jobs I worked on when I became an Electrician.

The day was growing long, and Sonny had taken over for me and was installing the second circuit board while I was sitting on a Tension house box  where Sonny had previously been sitting.  Suddenly I felt this sudden urge to burst out in song.  It was not known before this moment that I was sort of a professional singer.  Actually.  I had grown up with a family of singers.

My mother and my sister used to break out into song at random times throughout my childhood when a song would come over the radio on the easy listening station that was constantly on.  So naturally, it would be natural for me to want to break out into song when the moment was right.

So, I just let loose singing one of my favorite songs.  It didn’t matter that there wasn’t an accompaniment.  I didn’t need the orchestra behind me on the radio to help me keep time.  I had the orchestra playing in my mind….  I didn’t need the tuning fork that Sister Maureen used to use at Catholic School when I was kid as she would bang it on the desk and then hum with a wavering hum until it came in tune with her tuning fork.  No.  The tuning fork came from years of listening to my favorite songs.

Yes.  Even before the iPod was invented and the VCR had come around, there were two places where a person could hear a song over and over and over again.  One place was the radio.  Back in the 70’s when your favorite song was in the top 20’s you could hear it play over and over again every two hours on the radio.

So, I burst out with one of my favorite songs and started to serenade my new found friend, Sonny Kendrick.  I began quietly and worked my way up to a crescendo.  The song I sang began thus:   “Here’s the story of a lovely lady, who was bringing up three very lovely girls….”

I continued with  great confidence in my singing ability, knowing that I was impressing my fellow electrician with my fantastic singing ability:  “all of them had hair of gold, like their mother….the youngest one in curls!”   Even louder I bellowed out:  “Here’s the story of a man named Brady who was living with three boys of his own.  They were four men living all together, yet they were all alone!”

Now I was in full form  with my hand on my chest, standing at attention with all the full emotion I could draw out as I sang the final verse:  “Till the one day when the lady met this fellow.  And they knew that it was much more than a hunch, That this group must somehow form a family, That’s the way we all became the Brady bunch!”

Then as if I was playing an air guitar on stage, I was able to dramatically complete my short opera with the shaking of my head as I sang the final words:  “The Brady bunch, the Brady bunch.  That’s the way we became the Brady bunch bunch bunch…..”  (now you know the second place where you could hear a song over and over).

Acting rather proud of my accomplishment I relieved Sonny as I was going to install the third of the four Rapper cards in the cabinet….  I began connecting the wires to the circuit board one at a time when all of the sudden I was struck with some strange form of electricity!

Had we forgotten to turn off the electrical disconnect to the 480 Volts to the cabinet?  My fingers were shaking from the sudden impulse of electricity.  My knees were buckling so that I stumbled back and sat against rappers behind me.  I was completely stunned.  I couldn’t tell if my ears were actually picking up sound or I had suddenly died and was on my way to heaven because I had just electrocuted myself in the cabinet.

My head was spinning.  Thoughts entered my head like, “Great.  I have just been electrocuted!  I have only been an electrician for less than a month and already I have killed myself.   I hope my parents and my girlfriend don’t think I suffered when I died.”

Gradually, I realized that the sounds of harps and the humming of angels were all just an accompaniment that were being added by heaven itself to the song that was emanating  from Sonny Kendrick!  Sonny Kendrick, while he was taking his repose while I had proceeded to install my circuit board had suddenly had a similar urge to break out into song.

Only, unlike my feeble attempt at doing justice to the Brady Bunch Song, Sonny Kendrick was singing as if God himself had come down and suddenly transformed him into an Opera Singer.  I couldn’t tell if he was singing something from Wagner’s immortal Opera “The Ring” or if he was singing La Boheme by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa.

It didn’t matter to me.  All I could do was sit there on a tension house in stunned amazement.  Tears were rolling down my face. Here was a guy that people referred to as Baby Huey because of his build ( I guess):

I didn't really get the connection, unless it had something to do with the diaper.

This is Baby Huey.  I didn’t really get the connection.

Suddenly his lower build had moved up to the chest area and Sonny Kendrick had transformed into Franklin Floyd Kendrick!  The magnificent opera singer!

When my friend and sudden Opera singing hero had finished, he stepped over the conduits and went to work to add the last rapper circuit board on the rack with the other three.

Still sitting on the tension house coming to my senses.   Realizing that my transformation to heaven was only a temporary visit.  I asked Sonny…. “What was that?”  — That was all I could think of saying.  What else could I say?  “Can I have your Autograph?”  I suppose I could have said that.  No.  All I could say was, “What was that?”

Sonny as he is today

Sonny as he is today

Here is a picture of Sonny.  He didn’t have a beard then, but he has the exact same smile today that he had that day!  He gave me this exact same smile when I asked him “What was that?”  Exactly!

I said, “Sonny.  What are you doing here?  Why are you an electrician when you have a voice like that?”  He replied by telling me that he had a family and he had to provide for them and he couldn’t do it by being a singer.  So I asked him how he became an electrician.

You see.  At the time, Sonny had the distinction of being the Electrical Specialist.  He was the only one.  He had gone to Oklahoma State Tech in Okmulgee and received a technical degree there in electronics.  This gave him the ability to become the electrical specialist at the plant.

His real dream was to become an Opera Singer.  Being an electrician was something to pay the bills.  His heart was in his song.  Sonny has a tremendous heart.  I know.  I have seen and heard it beating.

There is a part of Sonny’s story that is a tragedy.  Isn’t that usually true with great artists?  I suppose that is where their passion for their creativity comes from.  This was true with Sonny, and in the next few months, I learned more and more about the burden that had been put on Sonny’s shoulders.

You see.  One day.  Sonny had said something to Leroy Godfrey to the effect that Sonny was a electrical specialist.  He should be doing something more than spending all his time working on the precipitator.  What his exact words were doesn’t really matter.  What matters is that Leroy Godfrey had decided that day that Sonny Kendrick was to be banished to the precipitator.  Never to work on anything but the precipitator.

In order to understand what this means… you have to understand the conditions someone has to work in when they work on the precipitator…   First of all.  No one wants to work with you, because it means working in the midst of pigeon dung, fly ash, and dust.  Along with that, when the unit is online, the roof of the precipitator is one of the loudest places at the plant.  Rappers and Vibrators going off constantly.  Buzzing and Banging!  Very hot in the summer and freezing in the winter.

As time went by, and Bill Rivers and Sonny filled in the blanks I came to understand just how burned out Sonny Kendrick was with working on the precipitator.  I could see how he literally had to drag himself to the precipitator roof to work on the cabinets or fix a transformer knife switch.  He would rather being doing anything else.

It had occurred to me at the time that the units had only been online for about 3 and 4 years and Sonny was already completely burned out on this job.   It made perfect sense to me when I understood that this was a punishment for trying to stand up to an Old School Power Plant Supervisor.  In order to understand Leroy Godfrey read the post:

The Death of an Old School Power Plant Man — Leroy Godfrey

A little less than two years later, Sonny Kendrick sang at my wedding.  He was up in the balcony singing a list of songs that had been given to him by my mom.  Bill Moler, the Evil Assistant Plant Manager who was serving as a Deacon at my wedding came in the front door dressed in his robes and ready to go into the church.  I was standing there greeting people as they came in.

Bill suddenly stopped and stood still for a moment.  Then he said, “Who is that singing?  Where did you find someone with such a wonderful voice?”  I proudly told him, “That’s Sonny.”   Bill leaned forward and said, “Our Sonny?”   I replied, “Yep.  Sonny Kendrick.  Our Sonny Kendrick.”

I had decided early on that I was going to do whatever I could to pull Sonny off of that Precipitator so that he could use his talents as they were meant to be used.  So, every time I was asked to help out on the precipitator, I was glad to help Sonny.

Years later, when Sonny was finally able to be free of the precipitator, he went kicking and screaming, because I had turned precipitator maintenance on it’s head and it was hard for Sonny to see his work all turned topsy turvy.  I knew that like myself, Sonny had a personal relationship with his work and that when someone else was tinkering with it it was a kind of “insult”.

I knew for Sonny it was best.  It didn’t take him long to step out into the open air and take a deep breathe.  Once he realized it was no longer his worry, he was a much happier man.  I am pleased to see that Sonny Kendrick today wears the same smile that he did that day when he had broken out in song and serenaded me on top of the Precipitator.

It means that he still has the peace that he is due.  I can’t help it.  I have to end this post by posting his picture again.  Just look into his eyes and see his joy.  I’ll bet this picture was taken just after he had finished an aria of La Traviata by Guiseppe Verdi:

Sonny as he is today

Sonny after gracing the world with an Aria

In a way.  Sonny’s life has been a Aria.  I have been blessed to  have been able to call him “Friend”.

In Memory of Sonny Karcher – Power Plant Man — repost

This is a repost of an original post that was published on January 7, 2012:

When I heard the sad news of the death of Sonny Karcher on 11/11/11, I wished I had been able to attend his funeral.  I did observe some amount of time that night when I heard about his death to remember the times I have spent with Sonny.  All of them good, as Sonny was always pleasant to be with even when he was mad about something.  Here are some of the first and last things I remember:

When I first worked at the Sooner power plant the summer of 1979, Sonny and Larry Riley were the first two mechanics I was assigned to work with.  They taught me how things were at the plant at that time.  Both of the units were still under construction, so there was no electricity being generated.

The first job we were to work on (my second day at the plant, since the first day was taking a safety class, and getting my hard hat and safety glasses and getting fitted for ear plugs) was a stuck check valve in the dumper sump pump pit (Not only did I not know what a check valve was, I wasn’t too sure what was meant by a dumper sump, though I did know “pump”).  It took us about an hour to take the truck to the coal yard, as a coal yard foreman Richard Nix had the key and wasn’t going to give it to us until one of his hands was ready to go with us.  So we sat in the truck parked in the north entrance of the maintenance shop for almost an hour.  When the guy was finally ready, and he had climbed in the back of the pickup, it turned out that he only needed to go as far as the parking lot… about 200 yards away (as the parking lot was at the Engineer’s shack at the time).  We dropped him off and drove up to the coal yard, and made our way down belt 2 to the sump pump pit at the tail end of the belt.

We tested the pump and saw that the water would run back into the sump once the pump stopped running.  So, it was determined that the check valve was stuck.  We drove back to the plant and took the morning break.

About an hour later, Sonny told me to go to the tool room and get the following items (which I thought was a joke, because he gave me such a strange list of tools that I didn’t recognize):   Two ¾ box ends, One four foot soft choker, a ¾ come-along, a ¾ shackle, a two foot steel choker a flat bastard file, a large channel lock, and two pry bars (I did recognize Pry Bars and shackle, which I believed was thrown in there just to make it sound legitimate).  – I wrote down the list, because I recognized right away that a joke was being played on me and I was going to play right along.  So, I went to the tool room and I asked Bud Schoonover (a very large  tall and easy going man at the time), “I need a ¾ come-along (I thought I would choose the most ridiculous item on the list first, just to get it over with…).  Well.  Bud turned around, walked to the back wall, took a come-along off the top of a pallet full of what appeared to be a bunch of junk, and laid it across the tool room gate window (The tool room was still being “organized” at the time).  So, I asked for two ¾ box ends (this was before anyone had been issued toolboxes by the way, that’s why we had to go to the tool room for these things).  Well, you know the rest of this part of the story.  These are all legitimate items, and I learned a lot that day and the next few weeks about the names of various tools.  I kept that list in my wallet for over 10 years as a reminder to myself of when I first came to the plant, and how much I didn’t know then.

So, Larry, Sonny and I went up to the coal yard, and went down to the tail end of #2 belt and removed the check valve from the discharge pipe and brought it back to the maintenance shop to repair.  When we returned, we went to lunch.  During lunch Sonny told me about how he was hired at Sooner plant.  He said he lived a few miles down the road and had heard that someone was building a lake up on top of the hill he could see from his property.  So, he went on over to see who was dumb enough to build a lake on top of a hill, and while he was looking around Orville Ferguson came up to him and asked  him if he was looking for a job.  Sonny said that he liked to mow grass, and Orville said that he would hire him to mow grass then.  Sonny said, if I remember correctly, that he was hired at the same time that Linda Shiever, the timekeeper, was hired and that they were the first two new hires at the plant.  The rest were already company employees that had transferred there.

After lunch we went down to the shop and took the check valve apart and what do you know….  There was a piece of coal stuck in the check valve keeping it open.  We cleaned it up and put it back together.  When we were finished, we took our afternoon break.  After break we drove back up to the coal yard and went down to the tail end of #2 Conveyor belt and put the check valve back in the discharge pipe.  When we returned to the maintenance shop, we returned the tools to the tool room and filled out our time cards.  A day’s worth of work cleaning a check valve.

I did many other things that first summer, since Sooner Plant didn’t have a yard crew yet, I worked most of the time in the maintenance shop bouncing around from crew to crew helping out.  I also did a lot of coal cleanup (especially on weekends), since the conveyor system didn’t work correctly when they started it up when they were starting to fire up unit 1.  But the second day before I left at the end of the summer to go back to school, I worked again with Larry Riley and Sonny Karcher to fix the exact same check valve.  This time we jumped in a truck (we had a lot more trucks now…. Which is another story), went to the coal yard, went down #2 tunnel to the tail end of #2 Conveyor, pulled out the check valve, removed the piece of coal, put the check valve back in, went back up to the truck and back to the maintenance shop just in time for morning break. Sooner Plant had improved a lot in the short time three months I worked that summer.

I worked many years with Sonny Karcher in the garage, and fixing coal handling equipment, and just about anything else.   He finally left the plant to go mow grass, when after a battle to move to the garage from coal yard maintenance to mow grass, he was told that he was going to have to go back to the coal yard to be a coal yard mechanic, because he was real good at that and they just needed him up there.  So he left.  He talked to me about it before he went, that’s how I know what was on his mind.  He said, “Kev, you remember when you first came here and I told you how they hired me to mow grass?  Well, that’s what I want to do.  Mow grass.  So I’m going to have to go back home and do just that.”

After that, the only times I remember seeing Sonny was when he was mowing grass down at Bill’s corner, with a smile on his face waving at the Sooner plant employees on their way home from work.

I can see Sonny talking to St. Peter at the gates of heaven now…..  The only words I can hear Sonny saying is, “I like to mow grass”… and St. Peter nodding with approval.

New Home in the Power Plant Electric Shop

November 7, 1983 I walked into the electric shop from the Power Plant Parking Lot with Bill Rivers.  Bill was an electrician that I had been carpooling with off and on for almost a year.  I remember walking in the door and the first thing I noticed were two guys leaning against the counter by the coffee pot that I hadn’t seen before.  They looked like a couple of Electrical Contract hands.

When I came in the door, Bill told them that I was the new electrician.  They both looked very surprised.  The tall one told me that his name was Art Hammond and that this was his first day as an electrician in the shop also.  He had just been hired.  The shorter guy introduced himself as Gene Roget (it is a French name pronounced “Row jay” with a soft J).  I could tell by his shock and look of disappointment at my young appearance and obvious lack of experience that he had been expecting to be hired permanently along with Arthur.

My new foreman was Charles Foster, the person that had asked me to think about becoming an electrician in the first place.  Charles was a calm mild mannered person that made it clear to me the first day that I could call him Charles, or Foster or even Chuck, but don’t call him Charlie.  Ok.  I made a note of that in my mind….. When the need arises to really irritate Charles, I should remember to call him Charlie.  —  Just a side note…  That need never did arise.  I did think it was funny that I had referred to my previous foreman Larry Riley as my Foster Father, and now I actually had a Foster for a Foreman.  The electric shop had a short Monday Morning Safety Meeting and then I officially began my 18 year career as an electrician.

I could go on and on about how Charles Foster and I became the best of friends.  I could fill up post after post of the things we did and the hundreds of conversations we had each day at lunch…. and um…. I suppose I will in good time.  Today I just want to focus on what we did the first day.  The first thing Charles told me after making it clear that “Charlie” was not the way to address him, was to tell me that he believed that the way I would become a good electrician was for him to not tell me much about how he would do something, but instead, he would let me figure it out myself.  And if I made a mistake.  That was all right.  I would learn from it.

I really hated making mistakes, and I wished at the time that he would let me follow him around telling me his electrical wisdom.  Finally, in my mind I thought, “Ok.  If Charles didn’t mind my making mistakes, then I will try not to mind it either.”  It was hard at first, but eventually, I found that making mistakes was the highlight of my day sometimes…  Sometimes not…  I’m sure I will talk a lot about those in the coming months.

I followed Charles up to Bill Bennett’s office.  He was our A foreman, and there was a cabinet in his office where he kept all the new electrician tools.  I was given a used black five gallon bucket and a tool pouch to carry my tools.  Like my first day as a summer help, I had to learn the name of a lot of new tools that day.  There were crimpers, side cutters, Lineman’s Pliers, strippers and Holding Screwdrivers.  I was given a special electrician pocket knife and was told that I would have to keep it very sharp.  I had all sizes of screwdrivers and nut drivers.  I put all the tools including the tool pouch into the black plastic bucket.

A black tool bucket like this

A black tool bucket like this

Bill Bennett was a tall very thin black man.  He was a heavy smoker.  This showed on his face as he looked older than I thought he really was.  He spoke with a gruff voice from years of smoking.  He was a very likable person (like most Power Plant Men).  He told me that they had tried really hard to get me in the electric shop because the two men in the corner offices really didn’t want me to move off of the labor crew.  He explained that I owed my new career to Charles Foster who gallantly went to bat for me.  I told him I was grateful.

I was also given a Pocket Protector and a pair of small screwdrivers (one a philips screw driver).  Charles explained that I would probably use these small screwdrivers more than any of the other tools.  I also was given a small notebook and a pen.  All of this went into my pocket protector.  Which went into the vest pocket on my flannel shirt.

Our Pocket Protectors were freebies given to us by vendors so they would have advertisements on them like these

Our Pocket Protectors were freebies given to us by vendors so they would have advertisements on them like these

We went back down to the electric shop and Charles introduced me to Gene Roget again and Charles asked Gene if he would help me organize my tools and teach me some of the basics around being an electrician.  Gene said that the first thing I needed to do was to lubricate my new tools.  It just doesn’t do to have tools that are stiff.  So, we worked on lubricating them and we even went down to the machine shop to get some abrasive paste that we worked into the tools to loosen them up.  Gene took his side cutters and threw them up in the air and as they flew up, they rapidly opened and closed making a rattling sound.  He caught them as they came down as if they were tied on his hand like a YoYo.

Wire Cutters similar to what I had

Wire Cutters similar to what I had

I worked the tools back and forth.  Lubricating them and rubbing the abrasive paste in the joint.  I had no coordination, so when I would try throwing my pliers in the air like Gene did, they would end up on the other end of the workbench, or across the room.  So, I didn’t try it too often when others were around where I might injure someone.  I thought.  I’ll work on that more when I’m alone or just Gene is around.  He had good reflexes and was able to quickly dodge my miss-thrown tools.

After Lunch Charles said that we had a job up at the coalyard that we needed to work on.  He told me to grab my tool bucket and the multimeter from the cabinet.  The electricians referred to it as the “Simpson”.

We had a couple of these Simpson Analog Multimeters in the shop

We had a couple of these Simpson Analog Multimeters in the shop

This was before each of us were issued our very own digital Fluke Mulimeter a few years later.  I’m sure the old electricians are chuckling to remember that we used to use these old Multimeters.  Charles explained to me that when you are checking voltage with the meter, that after you turn the dial to check voltage, always touch the two leads together to make sure the meter doesn’t move before touching the electric wires.  This is done because if something happens that causes the meter to still be on “Resistance”, then when you check the voltage, the meter or the leads could explode possibly causing an injury.  I had observed the electricians in the shop doing this back when I was a janitor, and now I knew why.

Charles explained that we needed to find out why the heater in the small pump room on the northwest corner of the dumper wasn’t running.  So, we went to coalyard and found the space heater mounted along the wall.  We tested it to make sure it wasn’t running.  After checking the circuits with the multimeter on a panel on the wall, we found that we needed to replace a small fuse block because it had become corroded from all the coal dust and moisture.

I had seen electrical he-men go up to a panel and hold a screwdriver in their hand out at arms length and unscrew screws rapidly, one at a time.  Bill Rivers had been doing that up on the precipitator roof when I was working with him while I was still on the Labor Crew.  He could unscrew screws from a terminal block faster than I could unwrap Hershey Kisses.

So, when Charles told me to remove the fuse block from the panel, I thought this would be an easy task.  I pulled out a screwdriver from my handy dandy tool bucket and with one hand holding the screwdriver, and the other hand steadying it by holding onto the stem of the screwdriver I moved toward the panel.  Charles stopped me by saying something like:  “Rule number one.  Never use two hands.  Especially when you are working on something hot.”  Ok.  I see..  If one hand is touching the metal screwdriver, and I come into contact with the screw which is electrified, then… um… yeah. Ok.  I dropped one hand to my side and proceeded to remove the fuse block.  That other hand remained at my side for the next 18 years when working on something hot (something is hot when it has the electricity turned on).

I explained above that I was pretty uncoordinated when it came to flipping my side cutters up into the air trying to act impressive like I knew what I was doing.  Well.  I couldn’t hold a screwdriver steady for the life of me.  I tried to match up the head of the screwdriver with the slot in the screw, but I was pretty wobbly.  It was kind of embarrassing.  The truth had come out.  This guy can’t even hold a screwdriver still.  How is he ever going to become a real electrician?

A small fuse block like this.

A small fuse block like this.

Using all my concentration, I fumbled about and began working the screw out of the fuse block, when suddenly the screwdriver slipped slightly and Pow!  Sparks flew.  I had shorted the screwdriver between the screw and the hot post on the fuse block.  There was a quick flash of light and a loud pop.  Geez.  The first time I’m working on something, what do I do?  I blew it….. literally.

Well.  Charles pointed out.  The electricity is off now.  Go ahead and change out the fuse block, then we will find out where the source of power is for it.  So, I changed it out…. Feeling a little down that my new screwdriver now had a neat little notch on the blade where the electricity had melted off a corner of my screwdriver.  We found the breaker that had been tripped in a DP Panel (which stands for Distribution Panel) in the Dumper Air Handler room and turned it back on.  We checked the heater and it was working.

At the end of the day, when Bill Bennett came down to the shop to see how my first day went, Charles told him that I had jumped right into it and already had a notch in my screwdriver to prove it.  Both Bill and Charles were good-natured about it. I filled out my timecard which told a short story about my first adventure as an electrician.

As I walked to the parking lot with Bill Rivers to go home, I was thinking that even though I had been full of nerves all day, this had to be one of the most exciting days of my life.  I was actually one of the electricians now.  I had the feeling that somehow something was going to happen and they were going to tell me that they made a mistake and that I would have to go back to the labor crew.  That was a feeling that haunted me for about 3 months after moving to the electric shop.

Power Plant Men 2012 in review

Thanks to everyone for visiting the Power Plant Men Blog this past year!!!

Below is a link to the statistics for 2012 for this site.

This blog had 15,000 views in 2012.

Click here to see the complete report.

In 2012 I published one post each Friday.

In 2013 I will be creating a new post each Friday and re-posting a previous post from the past year every Tuesday.