Power Plant Electric Shop Summer Help Stories or Rooster Eats Crow

I thought my days of working with summer help was over when I joined the Electric Shop at the Coal-fired Power Plant in North Central Oklahoma.  I had worked as a summer help for four summers while I was going to college to obtain a degree in Psychology.  As I stated before, this helped me become a first rate janitor, as I was able to lean on my broom and listen to the problems of Power Plant Men that needed an ear to bend and to have the reassurance that they really didn’t have a problem.  It was someone else’s problem.

When the second summer of my electrical career began, the electric shop was blessed to have Blake Tucker as a summer help.  I had worked with Blake before when we were in the garage, and I had found him to be a man of character.  I was glad to be working with him again.  Not only was Blake a respectable person, he was also very smart.

Blake was going to the university to become an Engineer.  Because of this, he was able to be in a higher class of summer help than I was ever able to achieve.  As I mentioned in earlier posts, my first summer I was making all of $3.89 an hour.  By the time I left to become a janitor, I had worked my way up to $5.14 an hour.  After arriving in the Electric shop, my wages had quickly shot up to a little over $7.50.  Blake was able to hire on as an engineer summer help which gave him the same wage that I was making.

Bill Bennett, our A Foreman, said that he had a difficult task that he thought the two of us could handle.  We needed to go through the entire plant and inspect every single extension cord, and electric cord attached to every piece of equipment less than 480 volts.  This included all drill presses, power drills, drop lights, coffee machines, water fountains, heat guns, electrical impact guns, refrigerators, hand held saws, sanders, grinders, and um…… er… it seems like I’m forgetting something.  It’ll come to me.

Anyway.  Each time we inspected something, we would put a copper ring around the cord with an aluminum tag where we had punched a number that identified the cord.  Then we recorded our findings in a binder.  We checked the grounding wire to make sure it was properly attached to the equipment.  We meggared the cord to make sure that there were no shorts or grounded circuits.  We made sure there were no open circuits and repaired any problems we found.  Then once we had given it our blessing, we returned it to our customers.

A Hand cranked Megger made by the same company, only newer than the ones we had

A Hand cranked Megger made by the same company, only newer than the ones we had

We went to every office, and shop in the plant.  From the main warehouse to the coal yard heavy equipment garage.  Wheeling our improvised inspection cart from place to place, soldering copper rings on each cord we inspected.

One thing I have learned about working next to someone continuously for a long time is that you may not realize the character of someone up front because first impressions get in the way, but after a while, you come to an understanding.  The true character of respectable people isn’t always visible right away (this was not true with Blake.  I could tell very quickly when I first worked with him as a summer help that he was a good person.  Work ethic tells you a lot about a person).  Other people on the other hand, that are not so respectable, are usually found out fairly quickly.

Men of honor aren’t the ones that stand up and say, “Look at me!  I’m a respectable person.”  People that are dishonorable, usually let everyone know right away that they are not to be trusted.  This isn’t always the case, but by studying their behavior their true character is usually revealed.  I think it usually has to do with how ethical someone is.  If they mean to do the right thing, then I am more inclined to put them in the honorable category.  — Anyway…

Since Blake was studying Engineering, I took the opportunity during lunch to run some of my mathematical queries by him.  Since I had been in High School, I had developed different “Breazile’s Theories”.  They were my own mathematical puzzles around different numerical oddities I had run across.  Like dealing with Prime number, Imaginary numbers and the Golden Ratio (among other things).

The spirals created by the center of a sunflower create a spiral in the proportion of the Golden Ratio.  The Golden Ratio is:1 plus the square root of 5 divided by 2.

The spirals created by the center of a sunflower create a spiral in the proportion of the Golden Ratio. The Golden Ratio is:1 plus the square root of 5 divided by 2.

Golden_ratio_formula

So, for part of the summer, we spent time on the white board in the office looking at different equations.  There was no one else at the plant at the time that I could talk to about these things.  — I mean… others just wouldn’t appreciate the significance of adding 1 to the golden ratio!

Anyway.  I titled this post “…Summer Help Stories”, and all I have done so far is talk about how good it was to work with Blake Tucker.  Well.  A couple of years after Blake was our summer help, we were… well… I wouldn’t use the word “Blessed” this time.  We were given a couple of other summer helps for the summer.  One of them was a good worker that we enjoyed having around.  His name was Chris Nixon.  I won’t mention this other guy’s name in order to not embarrass him, but his initials were Jess Nelson.

Right away, you knew that you didn’t want to work with Jess.  I worked with him once and I told my foreman Andy Tubbs that I didn’t want to work with him again because I felt that he was not safe.  I was afraid he was going to get both of us killed.  One reason may have been that I would have been fried in an electric chair for killing him after he did something really stupid.

Luckily Andy was accommodating.  He allowed me to steer clear of Jess for the rest of the summer.  We just had to watch out for him while he was in the shop.  He was messing around most of the time, and had absolutely no work ethic.  We couldn’t figure out how come he was allowed to stay after a while.  Most people in the shop didn’t want to be around him.

I think Bill Bennett finally found a couple of electricians that would take him.  He worked with O.D. McGaha and Bill Ennis on freeze protection.  Since it was the middle of the summer, I think that was probably the safest place for him.  it turned out that Bill Bennett had some pressure put on him to keep him in the electric shop instead of firing him outright because he was in the same fraternity in college that Ben Brandt, the Assistant Plant Manager at the time was in, and he was a “friend of the family.”

Anyway.  The majority of the plant knew about Jess before the end of the summer (as I said before.  Those people that are less honorable usually like to broadcast this to others).  That’s why, when Jess “stepped into a pile” of his own making, all the Power Plant Men just about threw a big party.  It seemed to them that Jess’s “Karma” had caught up with him.

Chris Nixon, the more honorable summer help, was from Stillwater, Oklahoma, and had actually gone to High School with my brother.  Jess on the other hand lived in a different town in Oklahoma usually, but was living in Stillwater while he was working at the plant.  I figure he was probably living in his fraternity house on campus though I don’t know that for certain.

Well.  One morning the week before the last week of the summer before the summer help headed back to school, Jess came into the shop strutting around like a proud rooster.  He was so proud of himself because he had been at a bar on the strip by the Oklahoma State University Campus and had picked up a “hot chick”.  He had a tremendously good time, and he wanted everyone to know all about it….. (as less honorable people often do).

Rooster

After everyone had to hear him crowing about it all morning, Chris Nixon sat down at the lunch bench and asked him about his date from the night before.  Jess went into detail describing the person that he had picked up (or had been picked up by).  After listening to Jess for a while, Chris came to a dilemma.  He knew the person that Jess was talking about.  After asking a few follow-up questions, Chris was sure that he knew the person that Jess had his intimate encounter with the night before.  He finally decided he had to say something.

Some of you may have already guessed it, and if you are one of the power plant men from the electric shop at the time (that I know read this blog), you are already chuckling if you are not already on the floor.  If you are one of those honorable electricians, and you are still in your chair, it’s probably because you are stunned with amazement that I would have ever relayed this story in an actual public post and are still wondering if I am really going to go on.

I said above that Chris Nixon knew this person.  I didn’t say that Chris knew this girl, or even “woman”.  Yes.  That’s right.  While Jess thought he was out with a hot blonde all night doing all sorts of sordid things that he had spent the morning bragging about, he was actually not with a woman at all.   Oh my gosh!  You have never heard the roar of silent laughter as loud as the one that was going through everyone’s mind when they heard about that one!

For those men that had been thinking that they wished they were young again while listening to Jess in the morning, they suddenly remembered why they had made the decision to keep on the straight and narrow when they were young.

It would have been more funny if it hadn’t been so pitiful.  After being sick to his stomach, he became angry.  He called up the local Braum’s to find out if a “person” meeting this description worked there as Chris had indicated.  He wanted to go down there and kill him.  Of course, he decided not to, but he did go home sick that day and didn’t show up the rest of the week.

He did show up the next week, and the female summer help that had been working in the warehouse had written a poem about their summer help experience which they shared to the entire maintenance group at a farewell lunch in which they made mention of Jess’s unfortunate encounter.

Some folks in the electric shop gave Jess their own “going away present” down in the cable spreading room.  I wasn’t there, so I can’t speak to it with any accuracy, so I’ll just leave it at that.  Luckily it was still kept clean after I had had the Spider Wars a few years earlier.  See the post Spider Wars and Bugs In the Basement for more about that.

Well.  We thought we had seen the last of this person.  We were shocked when next summer rolled around and Jess returned to our shop as the summer help again.  He had been a total waste of a helper the year before.  The entire electric shop went into an uproar.  Everyone refused to work with him because he was too unsafe.  We had barely escaped several injuries the year before.

Bill, being the nice guy that he was, had given Jess a good exit review the year before, because he didn’t want him to have a mark on his record.  Well, that had come back to bite him.

Both Charles Foster and Andy Tubbs, our two electrical B foremen at the time went to Bill Bennett and told him that he never should have agreed to have Jess come back when he knew that he was not a safe worker.  Bill had received some pressure from above to re-hire this person, and Jess had made it clear the year before that he could do what he wanted because Ben was friends with his family.  But with the total uprising, Bill had no choice but to go to Ben Brandt and tell him that he was going to have to let Jess go.

Talk about “awkward”.  I’m sure this was a tough task for Bill.  He always did his best to keep the peace and he took the “fall” for this.  Ben was angry at him for hiring him in the first place (after applying a certain amount of pressure himself) only to have to let him go.  Anyway, that was a much safer summer than the year before.  That was the last attempt at hiring a summer help for the electric shop.

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5 responses

  1. Thanks, Kevin – good post.
    I don’t remember Jess. But I enjoyed working with Ben. He was of fine character and always wanted to do the right thing. Personnel (Corporate Headquarters) made it extremely difficult to terminate anyone. I think they feared “unlawful discharge” lawsuits more than anything. We always preferred getting candid and objective evaluations from our Foremen before hiring rather than after (if possible).

    Like

  2. I was “suspect” early in your story of where you were going. I remember the whole thing and for years looked at every guy working at Braums and wondered. . . . .? ” I hope this guy scooping my ice cream isn’t him.

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    1. Yes. I believe the guy’s name was Terry.

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  3. Hi Kevin, I remember when that all happened. I ran into Chris Nixon last summer, he is working for the Payne County Sheriffs department.

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