Bohn’s Boner and the Power Plant Precipitator Computer

Up front, I would like to clarify the title so that those who are quickly perusing articles looking for something salacious won’t have to read too far before they realize this isn’t what they are seeking.  The word “Boner” in this headline refers to a “joke” played on a Plant Engineer by the name of George Bohn at the coal-fired Power Plant in North Central Oklahoma.  When I was a boy we had a joke book called the “Omnibus Book of Boners”.  Most of my life I never thought about the word “Boner” as having another meaning.  Which, after this joke was played might have explained the expression on George’s face.

Joke Book

Joke Book

In an earlier Post “Power Plant Humor and Joking With Gene Day” I explained that when playing a Power Plant joke, the longer it takes to play a simple joke, the better the effect.  I think the reason for this is that when the person realizes that a joke has been played on them by a fellow Power Plant Man and even though it was simple, the person went through the effort over a long period of time, just to make you smile for a moment.  Then you know that this person must truly be a good friend.  Who else would waste countless hours on someone over days, weeks, or even months, just to make someone smile once?

Well…. Bohn’s Boner lasted for over six months!  Yeah.  Six months, at least.

I saw the opportunity arise one day after we had received a new hard drive for precipitator computer for Unit 2.  We had the computers for a couple of years after we went to digital controls in the precipitator before the hard drive crashed.  This happened to be a project that George Bohn had managed.  He was the project manager and had overseen the installation of the precipitator controls, which included the two precipitator computers in the control room.  One for each unit.  They sat around behind the big control panel that you see when you watch an older movie about a Power Plant Control Room, like the China Syndrome.

I love this picture!

I love this picture!

Anyway,  each of the computers had 30 Megabyte hard drives.  Yeah.  You heard that right!  30 Megabytes.  That’s not a typo.  Not Gigabytes… nope.  Megabytes.  Just this morning at Dell, I received an e-mail with a file attached that was over 30 Megabytes in size (Thanks Norma).  I’m talking about an IBM AT computer:

IBM PC

IBM PC

Well, the Unit 2 precipitator computer was used to monitor all of the 84 control cabinets in the Precipitator control room.  It indicated how much voltage and amperage were on each cabinet, as well as the spark rate, and the setting on each cabinet.  It was really a great step up.  I’m sure today you can probably do that from your phone while you are sitting in a movie theater just before they tell you to silence your “Cell Phone Now” and stop texting your neighbor.  Back then, it was amazing.

All the operator had to do was go over to the computer, pull up the screen (this was before Windows, but the program was running by default), and type the keyboard command to tell it to print and “voila”, it would print out all that information.  The operator could look at it to see if there was a problem, and if not, he just saved it with all the other reports he was supposed to create during his shift.

Believe it or not.  Before this time, the operator actually walked up to all of the 84 cabinets on each unit and wrote down the voltage and amperage of each cabinet on a form.  You can imagine how much happier they were to be able to print it all out in the control room.  Hours and hours saved each week.

So, when the 30 Megabyte hard drive crashed George Bohn ordered a new hard drive from the IT department in Oklahoma City.  A couple of weeks later, we received the new hard drive from the city.  George gave it to me and asked me to install it in the computer.

When I installed the hard drive, I found that it had already been formatted.  All I had to do was install the program and we were good to go.  I backed up the program from the Unit 1 computer and copied it onto the new hard drive using a floppy disk.  Yeah.  Programs were a lot  smaller then.  A 360 Kilobyte floppy disk was all that was needed to hold the entire Precipitator program.

I noticed right away that instead of being the 30 Megabytes we had expected, there was only 20 Megabytes on the drive.  That was all right with me.  20 Megabytes would be enough so that we didn’t have to back anything up very often.

As I was installing the program and testing it, and going through the code figuring out how to change Unit 1 to Unit 2, I had an idea….  At the command prompt, I typed “D:” and hit enter.  You know what I was checking, right?  D colon, and enter…..

sure enough.  there was a D drive on this hard drive.  Another 20 Megabytes were on this partition.  You see.  This was actually a 40 Megabyte hard drive that had been partitioned as two 20 megabyte drives.

It was at this point that I thought I would play a little joke on George.  I figured he would come and look at this computer and at first he would find that the new hard drive was only a 20 Megabyte drive instead of the 30 Megabyte drive that he had ordered.  I also figured that like me, he would think about it for a minute and then check to see if there was an extra partition and would find the extra drive.

So I thought I would leave him a little present.  I went to D Drive and at the command prompt (gee… the only thing you had was a command prompt.  You didn’t even call it a command prompt then.  You called it a DOS prompt) that looked like this:  D:>  I typed –  “label d: Bohns Boner”  For all you older DOS people, you know what this did, right?  It labeled the D drive volume name “Bohns Boner”.   At the time I think we are on DOS 4.0 or something close to that.  The volume length was limited to 11 characters and Bohns Boner took exactly 11 characters.  The label couldn’t be longer than that.

Now, all I had to do was call up George Bohn, tell him I had installed the hard drive in the precipitator computer and it was up and running and go to the electric shop and wait for him to come down with a smile on his face over the name of the second drive on the computer.  So I did.  I told Charles Foster and Terry Blevins.

After the reorganization, Tom Gibson, our Electric Supervisor had decided that Terry Blevins would maintain the precipitator on Unit 2, and I would maintain Unit 1, which was great for me, because I was no longer working on both of them by myself.  So, Charles and I were waiting for George to arrive in the electric shop office.  It didn’t take long.

George came in the office and said, “Did you see that they only gave us a 20 Megabyte hard drive instead of a 30 Megabyte drive.  (Oh.  So, he hadn’t found the second partition).  I replied, “Yeah.  I noticed that.”  George was a little perturbed that he didn’t get what he ordered.  He said he was going to contact them and have them send us a 30 Megabyte drive.  We had paid for it.  I told him that he should.  Especially since we had paid for it (keeping a straight concerned look on my face).

Anyway, a couple of weeks went by and there was no new hard drive, and George hadn’t said anything more about it.  I thought he might have eventually found the second drive, but then he would say something like “I can’t believe they didn’t send us the right hard drive” and I would know that he still hadn’t figured it out.

One day the operators came to me and pulled me aside and asked me if there was some way when they were on the night shift if they could use the precipitator computer to create documents.  At this time PCs were pretty sparse.  The only good computers in the control room were these two precipitator computers and the Shift Supervisor’s office.  the Precipitator computers just sat there monitoring the precipitator all the time, even when no one cared.

The plant had purchased so many licenses to use Word Perfect, a word processor that was the “in thing” before Windows and Word came around.  So, I installed Word Perfect for them on the extra drive on the Unit 2 precipitator computer.  That is, Bohns Boner.  I explained to them that they could only use it when George Bohn was not around, because he didn’t know the drive existed and I wanted him to  find it himself someday.

Word Perfect for DOS

Word Perfect for DOS

Everyone agreed.  All the Control Room operators that were at all interested in creating documents, like Jim Cave and Dave Tarver and others, knew about Bohns Boner, and knew that it was a secret.

The Control room had a laser printer installed next to the Shift Supervisor’s office so they could print out Clearances and have them look nice.  They had some new Clearance system they installed, and this came with it.  So, the next question was… Is there a way we can print our documents out using the Laser Printer instead of the clunky Dot Matrix printer tied to the Precipitator computer?

I ordered a 50 foot Printer cable (I paid for it out of my own pocket) and kept it coiled up under the small desk where the precipitator computer sat and explained that they could just disconnect the dot matrix printer on the back of the computer and plug the other end into the Laser Printer and they could print out nice neat looking documents.  But… They had to do it at night or when they were sure that George Bohn was not around because he still didn’t know the extra drive existed.  Everyone agreed.  They would have to string the printer cable across the Control Room floor to reach the laser printer.

50 foot Power Plant Parallel Printer Cable

50 foot Power Plant Parallel Printer Cable

Like I said earlier.  this went on for well over 6 months.  It seemed like almost a year.  Then one day, George Bohn came down to the Electric Shop office while Charles and I were sitting there for lunch.  He said that he had asked Oklahoma City about the hard drive again, and they had insisted that they had sent the correct hard drive to our plant.  Then we could see a light go on in his head.  He said, “Do you suppose that they partitioned the disk into two drives?” (Bingo!  He had figured it out).  I said, “Could be.”

Charles and I sat there and looked at him while we ate our lunch.  The cherry tomatoes Charles had given me tasted especially good with my ham and cheese sandwich that day.  I knew that we were finally only minutes away from the end of the joke we had been playing on George for the past so many months.  George leaned back in the chair with his thin long legs stretched out and his hands behind his head.  I could tell he was thinking about it.

Then he rose from his chair and headed out the door.  Charles and I smiled at each other.  We both waited.  A few minutes later George came back in the office.  He had found Bohns Boner.  You see.  When you went to a drive back then on the command prompt, the first thing you would see was the volume name.  So as soon as he typed the D colon and enter, it would have said “Bohns Boner”.

George sat down in a chair.  He didn’t say anything.  He just sat there with a straight face as if he didn’t know what to think.  I thought…. well, he is an Engineer.  Maybe he doesn’t know what to do when Power Plant Men play jokes on them.  He looked like he couldn’t decide whether to be upset or glad that we had an even bigger hard drive than he ordered.  I don’t know if he ever figured out that the longer the joke takes, the more we liked him.

I guess George felt foolish that it took him so long to find that extra drive.  I suppose he might have thought he knew me well enough that if there had been an extra drive on the computer, when he first mentioned it, I would have told him that it was partitioned into two drives, so he didn’t give it a second thought.  I guess he didn’t know me as well as he thought.

Anyway, after that, he never said anything about the operators using the computer for other uses than monitoring the precipitator, which was always a problem before.  George never mentioned the hard drive again.  I don’t remember now if I later changed the volume name on the drive.  It seemed like not long after the computers were upgraded from the IBM AT to something like a XT 286.

Oh.  I had another joke I  played on George.  The other one lasted for years, and he never figured it.  I will write about that one later.  That one wasn’t so much of a joke as it was out of necessity.  I won’t say anymore about it now.  You’ll have to wait at least another week or two.

Advertisements

7 responses

  1. That’s a great one! I’m still amazed at your memory. How can you possibly remember what you had for lunch on a particular day 30 years ago? WOW.

    1. It was easy. I ate the sane thing every day.

  2. That’s such a clever joke! 😀

  3. I Gone through your Website its really amazing.
    very good information on Control panel product i got know useful information thanks for this.

    Control panel manufacturers

  4. It’s curious: There used to be a lot of that sort of thing in workplaces I kniew but my impression is that has largely disappeared these days…

    1. I think “Political Correctness” has put a damper on that. I still look for opportunities, but I have to think twice about it these days.

  5. […] that we were all keeping from George Bohn, another engineer that I talked about in the post “Bohn’s Boner and the Power Plant Precipitator Computer”  In that post we had kept from George that the computer had an extra drive partitioned on […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: