Hubbard Here! Hubbard There! Power Plant Hubbard Everywhere!

I’m not exactly sure why, but after having written 144 Power Plant Stories about the Coal-Fired Power Plant in North Central Oklahoma, I have yet to really tell you about one of the most important Power Plant Men during my 20 year stay at the Power Plant Palace.  I have mentioned many times that he was my carpooling buddy.  I have called him my Power Plant Brother.  I have explained many of his characteristics in other posts, but I have never really formally introduced you to the only person that would answer the Walkie Talkie radio and the gray phone with “Hubbard Here!”

Gaitronics Gray Phone

Gaitronics Gray Phone

There are a couple of reasons why I have waited until now I suppose.  One of the reasons is that I have two very terrific stories about Scott and I that I will be telling next year, as they took place after the 1994 downsizing, which I will be covering next year.  The other reason is that I wasn’t sure exactly how to tell you that at one point in my extraordinary career at the Power Plant Palace, I really didn’t have the warm-and-fuzzies for Scott Hubbard at all.  In fact, the thought of Scott Hubbard to me early in my career as an electrician was rather a sour one.

Let me explain….  I wrote a post August, 2012 that explained that while I was on the labor crew the Power Plant started up a new crew called “Testing”  (See the post:  “Take a Note Jan” said the Supervisor of Power Plant Production).  A rule (from somewhere…. we were told Corporate Headquarters) had been made that you had to have a college degree in order to even apply for the job.  Two of us on Labor Crew had college degrees, and our A foremen asked us to apply for the jobs.  When we did, we were told that there was a new rule.  No one that already worked for the Electric Company could be considered for the new jobs.  The above post explains this and what followed, so I won’t go into anymore detail about that.

When the team was formed, new employees were seen following around their new foreman, Keith Hodges (who is currently the Plant Manager of the same plant).

Keith Hodges 8 years before becoming foreman of the testing team with his new son, Keith Junior

Keith Hodges 8 years before becoming foreman of the testing team with his new son, Keith Junior

Ok.  While I’m on the subject of family pictures of the 1983 testing team’s new foreman, here is a more recent picture:

Keith Hodges 30 years after becoming foreman of the testing team with his new granddaughter Addison.  Time flies!

Keith Hodges 30 years after becoming foreman of the testing team with his granddaughter Addison. Time flies! Quality of Power Plant employee pictures improve!

When we were on the labor crew and we would be driving down to the plant from our coal yard home to go do coal cleanup in the conveyor system, we would watch a group of about 10 people following Keith like quail following the mother hen around the yard learning all about their new home at the Power Plant.  — I’ll have to admit that we were jealous.  We knew all about the plant already, but we thought we had been judged, “Not Good Enough” to be on the testing team.

One of those guys on the new testing team was Scott Hubbard.  Along with him were other long time Power Plant men like, Greg Davidson, Tony Mena, Richard Allen, Doug Black and Rich Litzer.  Those old testers reading this post will have to remind me of others.

I joined the electric shop in 1983 a few months after the testing team had been formed, and I really would have rather been an electrician than on the testing team anyway, it was just the principle of the thing that had upset us, so I was still carrying that feeling around with me.  So much so, that when the first downsizing in the company’s history hit us in 1988, and we learned that Scott Hubbard was going to come to the Electric Shop during the reorganization to fill Arthur Hammond’s place, who had taken the incentive package to leave (See the post “Power Plant Arguments with Arthur Hammond“), my first reaction was “Oh No!”

Diane Brien, my coworker (otherwise known as “my bucket buddy”) had told me that she had heard that Scott Hubbard was going to join our team to take Art’s place.  When I looked disappointed, she asked me what was the problem.  After thinking about it for a moment, I said, “I don’t know.  There’s just something that bugs me about Scott Hubbard”.  — I knew what it was.  I had just been angry about the whole thing that happened 5 years earlier, and I was still carrying that feeling around with me.  I guess I hadn’t realized it until then.  I also thought at the time that no one could really replace my dear friend Arthur Hammond who had abandoned the illustrious Power Plant Life to go try something else.

Anyway, Scott Hubbard came to our crew in 1988 and right away he was working with Ben Davis, so I didn’t see to much of him for a while as they were working a lot at a new Co-Gen plant at the Conoco (Continental) oil refinery in Ponca City.  So, my bucket buddy, Dee and I carried on as if nothing had changed.  That was until about 9 months later…. When I moved from Ponca City to Stillwater.

I had been living in Ponca City since a few months after I had been married until the spring of 1989.  Then we moved to Stillwater.  I had to move us on a Friday night out of the little run down house we were living in on 2nd Street in Ponca City to a much better house on 6th Avenue in Stillwater.

 

The house we rented in Ponca City, Oklahoma

The little house we rented in Ponca City, Oklahoma

I felt like the Jeffersons when I moved from a Street to an Avenue!

 

House we rented in Stilleater

House we rented in Stillwater

I  am mentioning the Friday night on May 5, 1989 because that was the day that I moved all our possessions out of the little junky house in Ponca City to Stillwater.  My wife was out of town visiting her sister in Saint Louis, and I was not able to move all of our belongings in my 1982 Honda Civic, as the glove compartment was too small for the mattress:

A 1982 Honda Civic

A 1982 Honda Civic

I figured I was going to rent a U-Haul truck, load it up with all our possessions and drive the 45 miles to Stillwater.  My only problem was figuring out how I was going to transport my car.  While trying to figure it out, Terry Blevins and Dick Dale offered to not only help me with that, but they would help me move everything.  Terry had an open trailer that he brought over and Dick Dale loaded his SUV with the rest of the stuff.  With the one trailer, the SUV and my 1982 Honda Civic, all our possessions were able to be moved in one trip. — I didn’t own a lot of furniture.  It consisted of one sofa, one 27 inch TV, One Kitchen Table a bed and a washer and dryer and boxes full of a bunch of junk like clothes, odds and ends and papers.  — Oh.  And I had a computer.

Once I was safely moved to Stillwater that night by my two friends, (who, had to drive back to Ponca City around 2:00 am after working all that day), my wife and I began our second three years of marriage on living in a house on the busiest street in the bustling town of Stillwater, 6th Avenue.  Otherwise known as Hwy 51.  The best part of this move was that we lived across the street from a Braum’s.  They make the best Ice Cream and Hamburgers in the state of Oklahoma!

Braum's is a great place to go for a Chocolate Malt and a Burger.  It is only found around Oklahoma and the surrounding states not too far from the Oklahoma border.

Braum’s is a great place to go for a Chocolate Malt and a Burger. It is only found around Oklahoma and the surrounding states not too far from the Oklahoma border.

I keep mentioning that I’m mentioning this because of this reason or that, but it all boils down to how Scott Hubbard and I really became very good friends.  You see…. Scott lived just south of Stillwater, and so, he had a pretty good drive to work each day.  Now that I lived in Stillwater, and we were on the same crew in the electric shop, it only made sense that we should start carpooling with each other.  So, we did.

Throughout the years that we carpooled, we also carpooled with Toby O’Brien and Fred Turner.  I have talked some about Toby in previous posts, but I don’t believe I’m mentioned Fred very often.  He worked in the Instrument and Controls department, and is an avid hunter just like Scott.  Scott and Fred had been friends long before I entered the scene and they would spend a lot of time talking about their preparations for the hunting season, then once the hunting season began, I would hear play-by-play accounts about sitting in dear stands waiting quietly, and listening to the sounds of approaching deer.  I would hear about shots being fired, targets missed, prey successfully bagged, dressed and butchered.  I would even be given samples of Deer Jerky.

I myself was not a hunter, but I think I could write a rudimentary “Hunter’s Survival Guide” just by absorbing all that knowledge on the way to work in the morning and again on the way home.

The think I liked most about Scott Hubbard was that he really enjoyed life.  There are those people that go around finding things to grumble about all the time, and then there are people like Scott Hubbard.  He generally found the good in just about anything that we encountered.  It rubbed off on the rest of the crew and it made us all better in the long run.  I don’t think anyone could work around Scott Hubbard for very long and remain a cynical old coot no matter how hard they tried.

Scott Hubbard and I eventually started working together more and more until we were like two peas in a pod.  Especially during outages and call outs in the middle of the night.  I think the operators were so used to seeing us working together so much that in the middle of the night when they needed to call out one of us, they just automatically called us both out.  So, we would meet at our usual carpooling spot and head out to the plant.

As I mentioned at the top of this post, I have two very good stories about Scott and I.  One of those has to do with a time when we were called out in the middle of the night to perform a special task.  I won’t describe it now, so, I’ll tell a short story about one Saturday when we were called out on a Saturday to be on standby to do some switching in the Substation.

I believe one of the units was being brought back online, and Scott and I were at the plant waiting for the boiler and the Turbine to come up to speed.  Things were progressing slower than anticipated, so we had to wait around for a while.  This was about the time that the Soviet Union fell in 1991.  We had been following this closely as new things were being learned each day about how life in Russia really was.  I had a copy of a the Wall Street Journal with me and as we sat in a pickup truck slowly driving around the wildlife preserve known as “The Power Plant”, I read an article about Life in the former Soviet Union.

The article was telling a story about how the U.S. had sent a bunch of food aid to Russia to help them out with their transition from slavery to freedom.  The United States  had sent Can Goods to Russia not realizing that they had yet to invent the can opener.  What a paradigm shift.  Thinking about how backward the “Other Superpower” was made life at our “Super” power plant seem a lot sweeter.  We even had military vets who still carried around their can openers on their key chains.  I think they called them “P 38’s”

 

P-38 Can Opener

GI issued P-38 Can Opener

The conditions in Russia at the time reminded me of the beginning sentence of the classic novel “A Tale of Two Cities”,     “Call me Ismael”….. Oh wait.  That’s “Moby Dick”.  No.  I meant to say,  “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times!”  —  It’s funny how you remember certain moments in Power Plant history just like it was yesterday, and other memories are much more foggy.  For instance, I don’t even remember the time when we… um….  oh well…..

The first thing that comes to the mind of any of the Power Plant Men at the Coal-fired Power Plant in North Centeral Oklahoma when you mention Scott Hubbards name, is how Scott answers the radio when he is paged.  He always replied with a cheerful “Hubbard Here!”  After doing this for so long, that just about became his nickname.  “Hubbard Here!”  The latest picture I have of Scott Hubbard was during Alan Kramer’s retirement party at the plant a few years ago.  I’m sure you can spot him.  He’s the one with the “Hubbard Here smile!

Scott Hubbard it the second on the right next to a very bald Jimmie Moore

Scott Hubbard it the second on the right next to a very bald Jimmie Moore

I will leave you with the official Power Plant Picture.  Here is a picture of Scott Hubbard in a rare moment of looking serious:

Scott Hubbard

Scott Hubbard

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3 responses

  1. Hello, I’ve nominated your blog for the One Lovely Blog award. You can check out the link below if you want to participate. Thanks! http://literarylifestories.com/2014/10/11/one-lovely-blog-award/

  2. It seems to me that Scott was always smiling. I’ll bet he even smiles while he’s asleep.

    Great story. Thanks 🙂

    1. Yeah. He would smile when he would fall asleep during the early morning trip to the power plant during overhaul when he wasn’t driving.

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