Tag Archives: Bunny

Power Plant Humor and Joking with Gene Day

This is a revised version of a post that was originally posted on 1/14/2012:

What sets power plant men apart from your regular mechanic, lineman or men of other occupations is that they are a semi-captive group of people with a lot of freedom to move about the plant and the plant grounds.  This provides for the opportunity to play jokes on each other without resorting to “horseplay”.  There is no room for horseplay at a power plant.  The power plant man lives among dangerous equipment, poisonous chemicals, carcinogenic dust, asbestos gloves and purely evil plant managers who would love to catch one of his minions engaging in horseplay.

The more elaborate yet simple joke seems to have the best effect on those who find themselves the victim.  First of all, the joke must be essentially harmless.  That is, no one is left injured (this rule seems to be more of a suggestion since I seemed to end up on the short end of the stick a few times).  Secondly,  the longer the joke takes to completion, the better.

If the joke goes on for a week or longer, then the final impact of the joke is much greater.  For instance.  A person that you are going to play a joke on sits in a chair that is raised and lowered by turning the chair upside down and twisting the wheel bracket around (which is how you lowered office chairs before the fancier spring and air cushioned chairs arrived).  Say you were to gradually lower a person’s chair each day by 1/8 of an inch or so.

Eventually, in a couple of weeks, the person will be sitting lower and lower at their desk until one day they get frustrated at sitting so low that they turn their chair over and raise the chair higher.  But each day, you keep lowering the chair by just a little bit until they are sitting so low again that they complain about it again and raise the chair up.  This can go on indefinitely.  The more people that know the joke is being played, the better in this instance.

The first time I met Gene Day, I knew that he was someone that would be fun to play jokes on.  I don’t know what it was about him exactly.  It wasn’t that he appeared to have a lower IQ.  On the contrary.  He seemed to be very knowledgeable as Control Room operators go.  Maybe it was because he seemed like a happy person that took most things rather lightly.

He wouldn’t be the type of person that would hold something against you just because you made him look foolish in front of his peers (or you posted it on a blog for the entire world to see.  — Right Gene?).  It seemed like the first time I noticed Gene Day, he was standing in the Control Room and I gave him a look like I was suspicious of him and he returned the look with one that said that he knew that I might be the type of person that would play a joke on him.  This surprised me, because I thought I had masked that look pretty well.

Gene Day is the one standing on the right with the Orange shirt.

Gene Day is the one standing on the right with the Orange shirt.  See what I mean about he has a face that says it would be great to play a joke on him?  Actually, everyone else smiling in this picture are doing so because they are in the middle of playing a joke on Gene, only he doesn’t know it yet.

Throughout my 20 years of power plant life I played many jokes on Gene Day, and each time it seems that I was throttled to the edge of extinction, which meant that I had executed the joke perfectly.  It seemed that each person had a different way of expressing their joy of finding out that they have been the victim of a power plant joke.  Gene’s general reaction was to place his hands carefully around your neck and start rapidly shaking your head back and forth.

My favorite Gene Day joke was not one that took a long time to execute, and from the time that I conceived the idea to the time that I was being strangled by Gene Day was a mere 15 hours.

It began when I was driving home from work one day on my way down Sixth Street in Stillwater Oklahoma where I lived on the west end of town at the time.  Gene Day was an operator and their shift was over an hour and a half before the rest of the plant.  As I drove down Sixth Street about a block ahead of me, I saw Gene Day’s truck pull away from the Rock House Gym travelling in the same direction.  Gene had a black pickup with flames on the side…. Something left over from High School I think…  The only one in town like it.

Gene Day's truck was similar to this only different, with a different pattern of flames and a newer type of truck

Gene Day’s truck was similar to this only different, with a different pattern of flames and a newer type of truck

I kept an eye on his truck to see where he went, and as he passed the Stillwater Hospital he pulled into an Eye Clinic and parked in the parking lot.   I drove on past and pulled into my driveway about 3 blocks further on.  As I checked my mail I decided to go to the bank to deposit some checks I had received.  I returned to my car and pulled my car out of the driveway and headed back into town.

Gene Day just happened to turn onto Sixth Street in front of me again as he left the Eye Clinic and proceeded to go down Sixth street in front of me.  So again I watched him to see where he went.

Just as I came to Duck Street, I saw Gene Day pull his truck into the Simon’s Gas Station on the corner of Duck and Sixth.  He had pulled his truck up to the garage instead of the pumps, so I figured that he was getting his truck inspected.  I turned on Duck street to go to the bank drive-thru about a block away from the gas station.

After taking care of my banking business, I left the bank and headed back home toward Sixth Street.  I arrived at the corner of Sixth Street just in time to see Gene Day pulling out of the gas station and heading off in the opposite direction toward his house.  I thought that he hadn’t been at the gas station very long so he probably had just had his truck inspected.

The next morning when I arrived at the plant I walked by Gene Day’s truck on the way to the electric shop and I looked to see if he had a new Safety Inspection sticker.  He didn’t have any Safety Inspection sticker which meant that his truck had failed the inspection.

Armed with this information when I arrived in the electric shop I took out a yellow pad of paper and proceeded to write the following:

Private Investigator’s Notes for Gene Day:

Date:  5/14/91

3:05  Gene Day leaves work.

3:45 Gene Day arrives at Rockhouse Gym where he works out with a young college coed named Bunny.

5:05 Gene Day leaves Rockhouse Gym.

5:07 Gene Day arrives at Cockrell Eye Care Center  where he meets with a nurse in his pickup truck in the parking lot.

5:20 Gene Day leaves Eye Care Center.

5:25 Gene Day arrives at Simon’s Garage at the corner of Sixth and Duck and has them clean his pickup seats to remove the perfume scent.  While he was there, he tried to have his pickup inspected, but it didn’t pass inspection.

5:33 Gene Day leaves Simon’s Garage and goes home.

I folded the paper in half and after I began work, I headed to the Control Room to see how the Electrostatic Precipitator was doing.  I sat at the computer by the Control Room door that opened up to the Turbine Generator room.  After a while Gene Day walked by on his way to pick up the mail from the front office.

I waited about 30 seconds and followed him out onto the Turbine Generator (T-G) floor.  The T-G floor at Sooner Plant is painted bright red and the floor is kept clean so that the lights overhead reflect off of the floor.

The Control Room is halfway across this large room about 200 yards long.  The office area is at one end.   I walked over to the door that leads to the Office area and laid the half folded paper in the middle of the floor.

I figured that Gene wouldn’t be able to resist picking it up to see what it said.  Then I went back to the Control Room and leaned against one of the big blue monitors used by the Control Room Operators to view alarms.

Unit 2 Turbine-Generator

This picture by Jim Cave shows the Unit 2 Turbine-Generator, The Office is in the opposite direction but just as far as to the wall at the end of the Generator

After a few minutes, Gene Day walked into the Control room.  In one arm he carried various parcels of mail.  In the other hand, he was carrying the yellow paper I had left for him to find.  He was violently shaking it at me yelling, “How did you do this?!?!”

I acted surprised as if I didn’t know what he was talking about.  Somehow he figured I was behind this, but for the life of me I don’t know why….  He tried to explain to me that he had stopped to see his wife who is a nurse at the Cockrell Eye Care Clinic, and that there wasn’t any girl named Bunny.  He couldn’t figure out how I would know that he tried to get his truck inspected and it failed inspection….

I insisted that I didn’t know what he was talking about.  About that time, the room became blurry as my head was shaking back and forth, and I came to the realization that this joke had been performed perfectly.

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Power Plant Customer Service Team Gone Wild

Originally posted July 4, 2014.  Added some pictures:

I never would have guessed that playing Power Plant Man jokes on Gene Day would have led me to the “Uh Oh!” moment I later encountered when I was told in no uncertain terms that the President of the Electric Company, James G. Harlow Junior was personally upset with something I had done.  I had learned my first year as a summer help at the coal-fired Power Plant in North Central Oklahoma that “One ‘Uh Oh’ wipes out all previous ‘Atta Boys’!”  I could tell by the way the Electric Supervisor, Tom Gibson’s ears were glowing red that this was considered a little more serious than I had first realized.

I have mentioned in previous posts that playing jokes on Gene Day was one of my favorite Power Plant Man Pastimes.    See the post, “Power Plant Humor and Joking With Gene Day“.    Also see, “Psychological Profile of a Power Plant Control Room Operator“.  My lunch breaks were usually consumed with learning more about how to program the Honeywell mainframe computer used by just about all the company processes that actually ran the company from payroll, to billing, to work orders and Inventory.  I figured that as I learned more about the computer system, the more elaborate jokes I would be able to play on Gene.

Already I had learned about the escape codes used by the large IBM printers that were used throughout the company at the time.  This allowed me to create graphic images on the printer as well as large bold letters.

IBM Dot Matrix Network Printer

IBM Dot Matrix Network Printer

Besides the telephone and inter-company mail, printers were the only other way to communicate to non-present Power Plant Men in 1989.  We had not yet been introduced to e-mail.  I was one of the few people in the company that had an e-mail address on the mainframe, and the only other person that I knew that I could write to was Craig Henry, a Corporate Engineer downtown.

 

Craig Henry.  Engineer and Gentleman

Craig Henry. Engineer and Gentleman

Much like the first time when I met Gene Day, when I first encountered Craig Henry, I could tell right away that he was a down-to-earth person that would shoot straight.  Craig probably wouldn’t remember this far into the future that I would reach out to him occasionally just to say “Hi” and to pick his brain about how the corporate IT infrastructure was setup.  I figured since he was one of the few people in the company that even knew what an e-mail address was at the time, he most likely had more knowledge about such things than the average person in Corporate Headquarters.

After finding out that Gene Day would go work out at the Rock Gym in Stillwater, Oklahoma after work, and I had played the joke on him with the notes from the private investigator, I used my knowledge of Printer Escape codes to write documents on the mainframe that when printed out would turn on the graphic commands on the printer so that I could print out pictures.  I don’t mean that I would have a saved picture that I would send to a printer like we might do today.  No.  I had to create these pictures one pixel at a time using commands in a UNIX document on the mainframe.  It was all codes that would not make sense to anyone that didn’t know the graphic commands of the IBM printers.

I had been teasing Gene Day about meeting up with a young “coed” from the University at the Gym each day.  I would do this by printing out messages on the Control Room printer by the the Shift Supervisor’s office when I knew that Gene Day was there filling in as the Shift Supervisor.  They were usually notes from someone that called herself “Bunny”.  Usually they were short notes or “love letters” from Bunny just saying something about how she enjoyed her time with Gene at the Gym.

At the bottom I would sign it “Bunny”  then under it, the printer would read the graphic commands and create a small Playboy Bunny symbol under the name.  At the end, the document would send a command that would put the printer back into the text mode.

Of course.  Whenever I walked into the control room shortly after, just to see how the precipitator was doing, Gene Day would confront me about the notes.  With a grin on his face he would say, “This isn’t funny!  What if my wife found one of these notes?”  — Like that was ever going to happen…. unless he was like me, and likes to save everything.

Note to Gene Day from Bunny

Note to Gene Day from Bunny (now she knows)

In order to create the bunny at the bottom I had to create the pixels in small blocks of 9 pixel patterns.  Here is the code I used to create the bunny:

See?  I save everything

See? I save everything

In the last couple of weeks I have written about how the Power Plant Men were introduced to the “Quality Process” (otherwise known as “Six Sigma”).  We had created teams with our crews and we met once each week to come up with Quality ideas.  By August, 1993, I had received my official Certificate Certifying that I had completed all the QuickStart training and was on my way to making a difference in the Power Plant World!

My Customer Service Team Certificate.  This made me official!

My Customer Service Team Certificate. This made me official!

So, what do these two events have in common and how did this lead the President of the Electric Company to send out a search warrant on a lowly (lowlife is more like it) Plant Electrician in North Central Oklahoma?  Well.  This is what happened…

First you have to remember that in 1993, the Internet was not easily accessible by the general public.  Company e-mail was still not a reality in our company.  We had dumb terminals and large IBM printers.  That was the extent of most employees interaction with a computer.  Each printer had a designation.  It was a four character ID beginning with a “P”.  So, the  printer in the Electric Shop Office might be…. P123.  I needed to know this number if I wanted to send  something to it.

At the time, the only thing people had to send to each other were requests for things from the mainframe systems that were used to run the company.  So, for instance, if you wanted to request some parts from the warehouse at our plant, we would send over a list of parts to the warehouse printer where Dick Dale and Darlene Mitchell would pick it up and go retrieve the parts.  So, the people that used the terminals and computers with mainframe emulators on them knew the most commonly used printer numbers in the plant.

If you wanted to send something to someone in Oklahoma City, or to the Power Plant in Muskogee, then you would have to call over there and ask the person what their Printer ID is so you can be sure you are sending your request to the appropriate printer.  Without e-mail, and any other form of computerized communication.  This was the only way at the time.

So, after our Customer Service Team was formed, we would meet once each week to brainstorm new ideas that would benefit the company.  Andy Tubbs was our team leader, as he was our foreman.

Andy Tubbs - True Power Plant Electrician

Andy Tubbs – True Power Plant Electrician

The other members of our Customer Service Team were Diana Brien, Scott Hubbard, Sonny Kendrick, Ben Davis and Gary Wehunt.  I haven’t properly introduced my bucket buddy Diana Brien in a post before.  I have recently obtained a photograph that I can share:

My Bucket Buddy Diana Brien

My Bucket Buddy Diana Brien

We were called bucket buddies because we carried tool buckets with us whenever we went to work on something.  They doubled as our stool and tripled as our trash can.

Thursday, July 15, 1993 during our Quality Brainstorming session, while we were pouring out ideas like…. “What if we changed out the street lights at the plant so that they would be different colors…. wouldn’t that help morale?….   and “How about if we wrapped fluorescent Christmas lights around the high voltage electric lines between here and Oklahoma City so that they could light up the night with colorful lights during the Christmas Season?”….. And other ingenious Brainstorming ideas that are bound to pull up an occasional brilliant idea….. well.  One such idea popped up!

I don’t remember which one of our brilliant brainstorming ideas conjured up this idea, but Andy Tubbs suddenly blurted out…. “What if we had the Printer IDs added as a column in the Corporate Directory? —  You see, each quarter we received an updated copy of the Corporate Phone Book.  It included the names and office phone numbers of all the Electric Company employees.  It also included their mail code.  So, if you wanted to send something through inter-company mail to them, you would know where to send it.  Our mail code was PP75.  That was the code for our power plant.

So, what if we added a column where we had the printer ID that each person would use for people to send printed requests, among other things?  This was Brilliant!  We could just make this proposal and send it downtown to Corporate Headquarters where it would be lost in the “mail”.  Or we could do more research to prove that it was a possible proposal that was really do-able.

So, I suggested….  Well… I can print a form out on every printer in the entire company requesting that they include all the names of all the people that use that printer and mail it through inter-company mail back to me at PP75.  — I had recently uncovered a special printer command that allowed me to do this hidden away on the Honeywell mainframe.  So, we took a vote and it was decided that we would pursue this proposal.  I set to work on creating the form that I would send to every printer.  If we could not only send the proposal to the Communications department downtown, but also a list of everyone and their printers, the work would already have been done for them.

I wanted to send a real fancy letter because I had already created a header using the Quality print settings on the printers.  I had created a Company Logo that (I thought) ingeniously used the backspace command to create two words with one word on top of the other in the middle of a sentence….  Our company began as Oklahoma Gas and…..  in the logo, I wanted the word Gas to be on top of the word And as it was in our company logo in smaller letters than the others.  So… after playing around with it for a while, I created the logo and had it saved on the mainframe.

I know.  I was rotten to Gene Day.  Here is an example of the header with the "GAS AND" in the middle of the name

I know. I was rotten to Gene Day. Here is an example of the header with the “GAS AND” in the middle of the name.  Remember.  This is on an old IBM Dot Matrix printer using the High Quality setting

After attaching the header to the form, I included a message that told the person that discovered the form on the printer to add the names of all people who used the printer below and to send the form to Kevin Breazile at PP75.  As I mentioned.  In order to make the form look pretty, I turned on the Quality Print settings on the printer at the beginning of the document.  Like the story of the Sorcerer’s Apprentice….. I didn’t know a good way to turn off all the settings I changed to revert the printers back to their original settings.

I ran the command to send the document to every printer on the print server and away they went…. A copy printed out on the  printer in the Electric Shop office so I knew it was working.  Copies printed out on the other 12 printers at our plant.  They also printed out on the 500 other printers throughout Oklahoma.  — With the thought that “My work here is done.”  I went back to work repairing plant electric equipment.

The following Monday I had the day off.  When I returned to work on Tuesday, Denise Anson called me from the front office.  She said that I had a large stack of mail.  I thought, “Oh good!”  Results from our request on Thursday have arrived!  I hurried up to the front office.

When I entered the mail cubicle I was surprised to see how big the pile of envelopes were.  The stack of inter-company envelopes was over two feet high.  “Um…. Thanks….”  I said to Denise.  I picked up the stack and headed back to the Electric Shop to sort out the forms.

After opening the first few envelopes.  I suddenly came to an astonishing discovery.  Not only did the form print out on the large mainframe IBM printers used in office areas, it also had printed out on other types of printers….  I opened one envelope and found the form printed out on a “Work Order” printer.  The paper size was different than the standard paper size, and I hadn’t put a page feed at the end of the document, so, it had left the paper in the middle of the page…. “Uh Oh”.

My “Uh Oh” changed to “UH OH!” after opening a few more of the inter-company envelopes.  I found that the form had printed out on Pay Check Printers!  And Billing Printers!  “UH OH!”  quickly changed to “OH NO!”  When I read comments like “Under no circumstances print anything on this Printer Again!!!!” I realized I had really messed things up.  By changing the font size and the quality settings, the billing, payroll and work order printers all had to be manually reset and the jobs that printed out paychecks, customer bills and employee work orders had to be re-run!

After taking all the forms out of their envelopes, the stack of papers was over 4 inches thick, just to give you an idea about how many responses we had.

A couple of hours later, Tom Gibson called me to his office. “Uh Oh.”  (remember… One “uh oh” erases all previous “atta boy”s).  When I entered Tom’s office, I could tell that something was definitely wrong.  Like I mentioned earlier.  Tom’s ears were beet red…. and in case you don’t know what a beet looks like.  Here is one:

The same color of Tom Gibson's ears

The same color of Tom Gibson’s ears

Of course… I knew what this was all about, only I didn’t know yet, how Tom had found out about it….  Tom began by saying…. “Ron Kilman just received a call from James Harlow asking him who is Kevin Breazile and why is he printing something out on my printer?  Ron didn’t like the fact that he wasn’t aware that you had sent something to the President of the Company’s printer.

 

James G. Harlow Jr.

James G. Harlow Jr.

Sorry.  That’s the biggest picture I could find of James Harlow….

Um what could I say?  So, I said this…

“Well.  This was a quality idea that our team had.  We wanted to collect the names of people that used each printer so that we could send in a proposal to have the printer ID added in the Corporate Directory.”

I didn’t mention that Harlow’s Secretary had returned the form with all the people that used his computer as I had requested, because I knew that the President of the Electric Company was not asking because he was upset that I had printed something out on his printer.   No.  He had probably been told that the reason the bills were late being sent to the one million customers that month was because some kook had messed up their printers and the jobs had to be run over again causing the delay.  So, I thought it was best not to go down that route at this time…

So, I stuck with my story, which was the truth…. I had printed out the forms on all the printers as part of a quality idea by our CST. — I also didn’t mention that three years earlier, Tom had asked me to learn everything I could about the company computer, because he believe that the computer was going to be the wave of the future.

Even though Tom believed my explanation, he told me…. “Kevin, Ron never wants this to happen again, therefore, you are never to send anything out of this plant without Ron Kilman’s personal approval.  Is that clear?”

I replied to Tom that this was unreasonable.  I send things to other departments all the time.  I send Substation Inspection forms, and blueprint revisions and all sorts of other forms downtown all the time.  Ron Kilman wouldn’t want to waste his time approving all those things….

Tom thought about it and revised his statement…. “Then, don’t ever send out anything that isn’t part of your normal daily job without Ron’s approval first.”  — Ok.  I thought…. this works, since everything I do is part of my normal daily job…. Even printing out forms on all the printers in the company… since that was part of our normal “Quality Process” Customer Service Team activity….  So, I happily agreed.  And I left Tom’s office happy that I hadn’t joined the ranks of the unemployed.

That was one thing about working at the plant at this time.  As long as your heart was in the right place….  That is, you tried your best to keep the electricity humming through the electric lines…. then the chances of being fired for messing up, even as big of a mess up as this, most often didn’t end up by losing your job.

I sometimes think that this was my biggest mess up of all time… however…. after this episode was over… there was a part two to this story….. Believe it or not…. Someone else in the company was overjoyed about what I had just done.  They had been trying to do something similar for a long time, only to be told that it was impossible. — Doing the Impossible… I was good at that… Part two of this story is a story for another day…

Since this is a repost of this story, I have written part two, which you can read here:  “Printing Impossible Power Plant Fast News Post“.

Power Plant Customer Service Team Gone Wild

Originally posted July 4, 2014.  Added some pictures:

I never would have guessed that playing Power Plant Man jokes on Gene Day would have led me to the “Uh Oh!” moment I later encountered when I was told in no uncertain terms that the President of the Electric Company, James G. Harlow Junior was personally upset with something I had done.  I had learned my first year as a summer help at the coal-fired Power Plant in North Central Oklahoma that “One ‘Uh Oh’ wipes out all previous ‘Atta Boys’!”  I could tell by the way the Electric Supervisor, Tom Gibson’s ears were glowing red that this was considered a little more serious than I had first realized.

I have mentioned in previous posts that playing jokes on Gene Day was one of my favorite Power Plant Man Pastimes.    See the post, “Power Plant Humor and Joking With Gene Day“.    Also see, “Psychological Profile of a Power Plant Control Room Operator“.  My lunch breaks were usually consumed with learning more about how to program the Honeywell mainframe computer used by just about all the company processes that actually ran the company from payroll, to billing, to work orders and Inventory.  I figured that as I learned more about the computer system, the more elaborate jokes I would be able to play on Gene.

Already I had learned about the escape codes used by the large IBM printers that were used throughout the company at the time.  This allowed me to create graphic images on the printer as well as large bold letters.

IBM Dot Matrix Network Printer

IBM Dot Matrix Network Printer

Besides the telephone and inter-company mail, printers were the only other way to communicate to non-present Power Plant Men in 1989.  We had not yet been introduced to e-mail.  I was one of the few people in the company that had an e-mail address, and the only other person that I knew that I could write to was Craig Henry, a Corporate Engineer downtown.

 

Craig Henry.  Engineer and Gentleman

Craig Henry. Engineer and Gentleman

Much like the first time when I met Gene Day, when I first encountered Craig Henry, I could tell right away that he was a down-to-earth person that would shoot straight.  Craig probably wouldn’t remember this far into the future that I would reach out to him occasionally just to say “Hi” and to pick his brain about how the corporate IT infrastructure was setup.  I figured since he was one of the few people in the company that even knew what an e-mail address was at the time, he most likely had more knowledge about such things than the average person in Corporate Headquarters.

After finding out that Gene Day would go work out at the Rock Gym in Stillwater, Oklahoma after work, and I had played the joke on him with the notes from the private investigator, I used my knowledge of Printer Escape codes to write documents on the mainframe that when printed out would turn on the graphic commands on the printer so that I could print out pictures.  I don’t mean that I would have a saved picture that I would send to a printer like we might do today.  No.  I had to create these pictures one pixel at a time using commands in a UNIX document on the mainframe.  It was all codes that would not make sense to anyone that didn’t know the graphic commands of the IBM printers.

I had been teasing Gene Day about meeting up with a young “coed” from the University at the Gym each day.  I would do this by printing out messages on the Control Room printer by the the Shift Supervisor’s office when I knew that Gene Day was there filling in as the Shift Supervisor.  They were usually notes from someone that called herself “Bunny”.  Usually they were short notes or “love letters” from Bunny just saying something about how she enjoyed her time with Gene at the Gym.

At the bottom I would sign it “Bunny”  then under it, the printer would read the graphic commands and create a small Playboy Bunny symbol under the name.  At the end, the document would send a command that would put the printer back into the text mode.

Of course.  Whenever I walked into the control room shortly after, just to see how the precipitator was doing, Gene Day would confront me about the notes.  With a grin on his face he would say, “This isn’t funny!  What if my wife found one of these notes?”  — Like that was ever going to happen…. unless he was like me, and likes to save everything.

Note to Gene Day from Bunny

Note to Gene Day from Bunny (now she knows)

In order to create the bunny at the bottom I had to create the pixels in small blocks of 9 pixel patterns.  Here is the code I used to create the bunny:

See?  I save everything

See? I save everything

In the last couple of weeks I have written about how the Power Plant Men were introduced to the “Quality Process” (otherwise known as “Six Sigma”).  We had created teams with our crews and we met once each week to come up with Quality ideas.  By August, 1993, I had received my official Certificate Certifying that I had completed all the QuickStart training and was on my way to making a difference in the Power Plant World!

My Customer Service Team Certificate.  This made me official!

My Customer Service Team Certificate. This made me official!

So, what do these two events have in common and how did this lead the President of the Electric Company to send out a search warrant on a lowly Plant Electrician in North Central Oklahoma?  Well.  This is what happened…

First you have to remember that in 1993, the Internet was not easily accessible by the general public.  Company e-mail was still not a reality in our company.  We had dumb terminals and large IBM printers.  That was the extent of most employees interaction with a computer.  Each printer had a designation.  It was a four character ID beginning with a “P”.  So, the  printer in the Electric Shop Office might be…. P123.  I needed to know this number if I wanted to send  something to it.

At the time, the only thing people had to send to each other were requests for things from the mainframe systems that were used to run the company.  So, for instance, if you wanted to request some parts from the warehouse at our plant, we would send over a list of parts to the warehouse printer where Dick Dale and Darlene Mitchell would pick it up and go retrieve the parts.  So, the people that used the terminals and computers with mainframe emulators on them knew the most commonly used printer numbers in the plant.

If you wanted to send something to someone in Oklahoma City, or to the Power Plant in Muskogee, then you would have to call over there and ask the person what their Printer ID is so you can be sure you are sending your request to the appropriate printer.  Without e-mail, and any other form of computerized communication.  This was the only way at the time.

So, after our Customer Service Team was formed, we would meet once each week to brainstorm new ideas that would benefit the company.  Andy Tubbs was our team leader, as he was our foreman.

Andy Tubbs - True Power Plant Electrician

Andy Tubbs – True Power Plant Electrician

The other members of our Customer Service Team were Diana Brien, Scott Hubbard, Sonny Kendrick, Ben Davis and Gary Wehunt.  I haven’t properly introduced my bucket buddy Diana Brien in a post before.  I have recently obtained a photograph that I can share:

My Bucket Buddy Diana Brien

My Bucket Buddy Diana Brien

We were called bucket buddies because we carried tool buckets with us whenever we went to work on something.  They doubled as our stool and tripled as our trash can.

Thursday, July 15, 1993 during our Quality Brainstorming session, while we were pouring out ideas like…. “What if we changed out the street lights at the plant so that they would be different colors…. wouldn’t that help morale?….   and “How about if we wrapped fluorescent Christmas lights around the high voltage electric lines between here and Oklahoma City so that they could light up the night with colorful lights during the Christmas Season?”….. And other ingenious Brainstorming ideas that are bound to pull up an occasional brilliant idea….. well.  One such idea popped up!

I don’t remember which one of our brilliant brainstorming ideas conjured up this idea, but Andy Tubbs suddenly blurted out…. “What if we had the Printer IDs added as a column in the Corporate Directory? —  You see, each quarter we received an updated copy of the Corporate Phone Book.  It included the names and office phone numbers of all the Electric Company employees.  It also included their mail code.  So, if you wanted to send something through inter-company mail to them, you would know where to send it.  Our mail code was PP75.  That was the code for our power plant.

So, what if we added a column where we had the printer ID that each person would use for people to send printed requests, among other things?  This was Brilliant!  We could just make this proposal and send it downtown to Corporate Headquarters where it would be lost in the “mail”.  Or we could do more research to prove that it was a possible proposal that was really do-able.

So, I suggested….  Well… I can print a form out on every printer in the entire company requesting that they include all the names of all the people on that use that printer and mail it through inter-company mail back to me at PP75.  — I had recently uncovered a special printer command that allowed me to do this hidden away on the Honeywell mainframe.  So, we took a vote and it was decided that we would pursue this proposal.  I set to work on creating the form that I would send to every printer.  If we could not only send the proposal to the Communications department downtown, but also a list of everyone and their printers, the work would already have been done for them.

I wanted to send a real fancy letter because I had already created a header using the Quality print settings on the printers.  I had created a Company Logo that (I thought) ingeniously used the backspace command to create two words with one word on top of the other in the middle of a sentence….  Our company began as Oklahoma Gas and…..  in the logo, I wanted the word Gas to be on top of the word And as it was in our company logo in smaller letters than the others.  So… after playing around with it for a while, I created the logo and had it saved on the mainframe.

I know.  I was rotten to Gene Day.  Here is an example of the header with the "GAS AND" in the middle of the name

I know. I was rotten to Gene Day. Here is an example of the header with the “GAS AND” in the middle of the name.  Remember.  This is on an old IBM Dot Matrix printer using the High Quality setting

After attaching the header to the form, I included a message that told the person that discovered the form on the printer to add the names of all people who used the printer below and to send the form to Kevin Breazile at PP75.  As I mentioned.  In order to make the form look pretty, I turned on the Quality Print settings on the printer at the beginning of the document.  Like the story of the Sorcerer’s Apprentice….. I didn’t know a good way to turn off all the settings I changed to revert the printers back to their original settings.

I ran the command to send the document to every printer on the print server and away they went…. A copy printed out on the  printer in the Electric Shop office so I knew it was working.  Copies printed out on the other 12 printers at our plant.  They also printed out on the 500 other printers throughout Oklahoma.  — With the thought that “My work here is done.”  I went back to work repairing plant electric equipment.

The following Monday I had the day off.  When I returned to work on Tuesday, Denise Anson called me from the front office.  She said that I had a large stack of mail.  I thought, “Oh good!”  Results from our request on Thursday have arrived!  I hurried up to the front office.

When I entered the mail cubicle I was surprised to see how big the pile of envelopes were.  The stack of inter-company envelopes was over two feet high.  “Um…. Thanks….”  I said to Denise.  I picked up the stack and headed back to the Electric Shop to sort out the forms.

After opening the first few envelopes.  I suddenly came to an astonishing discovery.  Not only did the form print out on the large mainframe IBM printers used in office areas, it also had printed out on other types of printers….  I opened one envelope and found the form printed out on a “Work Order” printer.  The paper size was different than the standard paper size, and I hadn’t put a page feed at the end of the document, so, it had left the paper in the middle of the page…. “Uh Oh”.

My “Uh Oh” changed to “UH OH!” after opening a few more of the inter-company envelopes.  I found that the form had printed out on Pay Check Printers!  And Billing Printers!  “UH OH!”  quickly changed to “OH NO!”  When I read comments like “Under no circumstances print anything on this Printer Again!!!!” I realized I had really messed things up.  By changing the font size and the quality settings, the billing, payroll and work order printers all had to be manually reset and the jobs that printed out paychecks, customer bills and employee work orders had to be re-run!

After taking all the forms out of their envelopes, the stack of papers was over 4 inches thick, just to give you an idea about how many responses we had.

A couple of hours later, Tom Gibson called me to his office. “Uh Oh.”  (remember… One “uh oh” erases all previous “atta boy”s).  When I entered Tom’s office, I could tell that something was definitely wrong.  Like I mentioned earlier.  Tom’s ears were beet red…. and in case you don’t know what a beet looks like.  Here is one:

The same color of Tom Gibson's ears

The same color of Tom Gibson’s ears

Of course… I knew what this was all about, only I didn’t know yet, how Tom had found out about it….  Tom began by saying…. “Ron Kilman just received a call from James Harlow asking him who is Kevin Breazile and why is he printing something out on my printer?  Ron didn’t like the fact that he wasn’t aware that you had sent something to the President of the Company’s printer.

 

James G. Harlow Jr.

James G. Harlow Jr.

Sorry.  That’s the biggest picture I could find of James Harlow….

Um what could I say?  So, I said this…

Well.  This was a quality idea that our team had.  We wanted to collect the names of people that used each printer so that we could send in a proposal to have the printer ID added in the Corporate Directory.

I didn’t mention that Harlow’s Secretary had returned the form with all the people that used his computer as I had requested, because I knew that the President of the Electric Company was not asking because he was upset that I had printed something out on his printer.   No.  He had probably been told that the reason the bills were late being sent to the one million customers that month was because some kook had messed up their printers and the jobs had to be run over again causing the delay.  So, I thought it was best not to go down that route at this time…

So, I stuck with my story, which was the truth…. I had printed out the forms on all the printers as part of a quality idea by our CST. — I also didn’t mention that three years earlier, Tom had asked me to learn everything I could about the company computer, because he believe that the computer was going to be the wave of the future.

Even though Tom believed my explanation, he told me…. “Kevin, Ron never wants this to happen again, therefore, you are never to send anything out of this plant without Ron Kilman’s personal approval.  Is that clear?”

I replied to Tom that this was unreasonable.  I send things to other departments all the time.  I send Substation Inspection forms, and blueprint revisions and all sorts of other forms downtown all the time.  Ron Kilman wouldn’t want to waste his time approving all those things….

Tom thought about it and revised his statement…. “Then, don’t ever send out anything that isn’t part of your normal daily job without Ron’s approval first.”  — Ok.  I thought…. this works, since everything I do is part of my normal daily job…. Even printing out forms on all the printers in the company… since that was part of our normal “Quality Process” Customer Service Team activity….  So, I happily agreed.  And I left Tom’s office happy that I hadn’t joined the ranks of the unemployed.

That was one thing about working at the plant at this time.  As long as your heart was in the right place….  That is, you tried your best to keep the electricity humming through the electric lines…. then the chances of being fired for messing up, even as big of a mess up as this, most often didn’t end up by losing your job.

I sometimes think that this was my biggest mess up of all time… however…. after this episode was over… there was a part two to this story….. Believe it or not…. Someone else in the company was overjoyed about what I had just done.  They had been trying to do something similar for a long time, only to be told that it was impossible. — Doing the Impossible… I was good at that… Part two of this story is a story for another day…

Since this is a repost of this story, I have written part two, which you can read here:  “Printing Impossible Power Plant Fast News Post“.

Power Plant Humor and Joking with Gene Day

This is a revised version of a post that was originally posted on 1/14/2012:

What sets power plant men apart from your regular mechanic, lineman or men of other occupations is that they are a semi-captive group of people with a lot of freedom to move about the plant and the plant grounds.  This provides for the opportunity to play jokes on each other without resorting to “horseplay”.  There is no room for horseplay at a power plant.  The power plant man lives among dangerous equipment, poisonous chemicals, carcinogenic dust, asbestos gloves and purely evil plant managers who would love to catch one of his minions engaging in horseplay.

The more elaborate yet simple joke seems to have the best effect on those who find themselves the victim.  First of all, the joke must be essentially harmless.  That is, no one is left injured (this rule seems to be more of a suggestion since I seemed to end up on the short end of the stick a few times).  Secondly,  the longer the joke takes to completion, the better.

If the joke goes on for a week or longer, then the final impact of the joke is much greater.  For instance.  A person that you are going to play a joke on sits in a chair that is raised and lowered by turning the chair upside down and twisting the wheel bracket around (which is how you lowered office chairs before the fancier spring and air cushioned chairs arrived).  Say you were to gradually lower a person’s chair each day by 1/8 of an inch or so.

Eventually, in a couple of weeks, the person will be sitting lower and lower at their desk until one day they get frustrated at sitting so low that they turn their chair over and raise the chair higher.  But each day, you keep lowering the chair by just a little bit until they are sitting so low again that they complain about it again and raise the chair up.  This can go on indefinitely.  The more people that know the joke is being played, the better in this instance.

The first time I met Gene Day, I knew that he was someone that would be fun to play jokes on.  I don’t know what it was about him exactly.  It wasn’t that he appeared to have a lower IQ.  On the contrary.  He seemed to be very knowledgeable as Control Room operators go.  Maybe it was because he seemed like a happy person that took most things rather lightly.

He wouldn’t be the type of person that would hold something against you just because you made him look foolish in front of his peers (or you posted it on a blog for the entire world to see.  — Right Gene?).  It seemed like the first time I noticed Gene Day, he was standing in the Control Room and I gave him a look like I was suspicious of him and he returned the look with one that said that he knew that I might be the type of person that would play a joke on him.  This surprised me, because I thought I had masked that look pretty well.

Gene Day is the one standing on the right with the Orange shirt.

Gene Day is the one standing on the right with the Orange shirt.  See what I mean about he has a face that says it would be great to play a joke on him?

Throughout my 20 years of power plant life I played many jokes on Gene Day, and each time it seems that I was throttled to the edge of extinction, which meant that I had executed the joke perfectly.  It seemed that each person had a different way of expressing their joy of finding out that they have been the victim of a power plant joke.  Gene’s general reaction was to place his hands carefully around your neck and start rapidly shaking your head back in forth.

My favorite Gene Day joke was not one that took a long time to execute, and from the time that I conceived the idea to the time that I was being strangled by Gene Day was a mere 15 hours.

It began when I was driving home from work one day on my way down Sixth Street in Stillwater Oklahoma where I lived on the west end of town at the time.  Gene Day was an operator and their shift was over an hour and a half before the rest of the plant.  As I drove down Sixth Street about a block ahead of me, I saw Gene Day’s truck pull away from the Rock House Gym travelling in the same direction.  Gene had a black pickup with flames on the side…. Something left over from High School I think…  The only one in town like it.

Gene Day's truck was similar to this only different, with a different pattern of flames and a newer type of truck

Gene Day’s truck was similar to this only different, with a different pattern of flames and a newer type of truck

I kept an eye on his truck to see where he went, and as he passed the Stillwater Hospital he pulled into an Eye Clinic and parked in the parking lot.   I drove on past and pulled into my driveway about 3 blocks further on.  As I checked my mail I decided to go to the bank to deposit some checks I had received.  I returned to my car and pulled my car out of the driveway and headed back into town.

Gene Day just happened to turn onto Sixth Street in front of me again as he left the Eye Clinic and proceeded to go down Sixth street in front of me.  So again I watched him to see where he went.

Just as I came to Duck Street, I saw Gene Day pull his truck into the Simon’s Gas Station on the corner of Duck and Sixth.  He had pulled his truck up to the garage instead of the pumps, so I figured that he was getting his truck inspected.  I turned on Duck street to go to the bank drive-thru about a block away from the gas station.

After taking care of my banking business, I left the bank and headed back home toward Sixth Street.  I arrived at the corner of Sixth Street just in time to see Gene Day pulling out of the gas station and heading off in the opposite direction toward his house.  I thought that he hadn’t been at the gas station very long so he probably had just had his truck inspected.

The next morning when I arrived at the plant I walked by Gene Day’s truck on the way to the electric shop and I looked to see if he had a new Safety Inspection sticker.  He didn’t have any Safety Inspection sticker which meant that his truck had failed the inspection.

Armed with this information when I arrived in the electric shop I took out a yellow pad of paper and proceeded to write the following:

Private Investigator’s Notes for Gene Day:

Date:  5/14/91

3:05  Gene Day leaves work.

3:45 Gene Day arrives at Rockhouse Gym where he works out with a young college coed named Bunny.

5:05 Gene Day leaves Rockhouse Gym.

5:07 Gene Day arrives at Cockrell Eye Care Center  where he meets with a nurse in his pickup truck in the parking lot.

5:20 Gene Day leaves Eye Care Center.

5:25 Gene Day arrives at Simon’s Garage at the corner of Sixth and Duck and has them clean his pickup seats to remove the perfume scent.  While he was there, he tried to have his pickup inspected, but it didn’t pass inspection.

5:33 Gene Day leaves Simon’s Garage and goes home.

I folded the paper in half and after I began work, I headed to the Control Room to see how the Electrostatic Precipitator was doing.  I sat at the computer by the Control Room door that opened up to the Turbine Generator room.  After a while Gene Day walked by on his way to pick up the mail from the front office.

I waited about 30 seconds and followed him out onto the Turbine Generator (T-G) floor.  The T-G floor at Sooner Plant is painted bright red and the floor is kept clean so that the lights overhead reflect off of the floor.

The Control Room is halfway across this large room about 200 yards long.  The office area is at one end.   I walked over to the door that leads to the Office area and laid the half folded paper in the middle of the floor.

I figured that Gene wouldn’t be able to resist picking it up to see what it said.  Then I went back to the Control Room and leaned against one of the big blue monitors used by the Control Room Operators to view alarms.

Unit 2 Turbine-Generator

This picture by Jim Cave shows the Unit 2 Turbine-Generator, The Office is in the opposite direction but just as far as to the wall at the end of the Generator

After a few minutes, Gene Day walked into the Control room.  In one arm he carried various parcels of mail.  In the other hand, he was carrying the yellow paper I had left for him to find.  He was violently shaking it at me yelling, “How did you do this?!?!”

I acted surprised as if I didn’t know what he was talking about.  Somehow he figured I was behind this, but for the life of me.  I don’t know why….  He tried to explain to me that he had stopped to see his wife who is a nurse at the Cockrell Eye Care Clinic, and that there wasn’t any girl named Bunny.  He couldn’t figure out how I would know that he tried to get his truck inspected and it failed inspection….

I insisted that I didn’t know what he was talking about.  About that time, the room became blurry as my head was shaking back and forth, and I came to the realization that this joke had been performed perfectly.

Power Plant Customer Service Team Gone Wild

I never would have guessed that playing Power Plant Man jokes on Gene Day would have led me to the “Uh Oh!” moment I later encountered when I was told in no uncertain terms that the President of the Electric Company, James G. Harlow Junior was personally upset with something I had done.  I had learned my first year as a summer help at the coal-fired Power Plant in North Central Oklahoma that “One ‘Uh Oh’ wipes out all previous ‘Atta Boys’!”  I could tell by the way the Electric Supervisor, Tom Gibson’s ears were glowing red that this was considered a little more serious than I had first realized.

I have mentioned in previous posts that playing jokes on Gene Day was one of my favorite Power Plant Man Pastimes.    See the post, “Power Plant Humor and Joking With Gene Day“.    Also see, “Psychological Profile of a Power Plant Control Room Operator“.  My lunch breaks were usually consumed with learning more about how to program the Honeywell mainframe computer used by just about all the company processes that actually ran the company from payroll, to billing, to work orders and Inventory.  I figured that as I learned more about the computer system, the more elaborate jokes I would be able to play on Gene.

Already I had learned about the escape codes used by the large IBM printers that were used throughout the company at the time.

IBM Dot Matrix Network Printer

IBM Dot Matrix Network Printer

Besides the telephone and inter-company mail, printers were the only other way to communicate to non-present Power Plant Men in 1989.  We had not yet been introduced to e-mail.  I was one of the few people in the company that had an e-mail address, and the only other person that I knew that I could write to was Craig Henry, a Corporate Engineer downtown.

 

Craig Henry.  Engineer and Gentleman

Craig Henry. Engineer and Gentleman

Much like the first time when I met Gene Day, when I first encountered Craig Henry, I could tell right away that he was a down-to-earth person that would shoot straight.  Craig probably wouldn’t remember this far into the future that I would reach out to him occasionally just to say “Hi” and to pick his brain about how the corporate IT infrastructure was setup.  I figured since he was one of the few people in the company that even knew what an e-mail address was at the time, he most likely had more knowledge about such things than the average person in Corporate Headquarters.

After finding out that Gene Day would go work out at the Rock Gym in Stillwater, Oklahoma after work, and I had played the joke on him with the notes from the private investigator, I used my knowledge of Printer Escape codes to write documents on the mainframe that when printed out would turn on the graphic commands on the printer so that I could print out pictures.  I don’t mean that I would have a saved picture that I would send to a printer like we might do today.  No.  I had to create these pictures one pixel at a time using commands in a UNIX document on the mainframe.  It was all codes that would not make sense to anyone that didn’t know the graphic commands of the IBM printers.

I had been teasing Gene Day about meeting up with a young “coed” from the University at the Gym each day.  I would do this by printing out messages on the Control Room printer by the the Shift Supervisor’s office when I knew that Gene Day was there filling in as the Shift Supervisor.  They were usually notes from someone that called herself “Bunny”.  Usually they were short notes or “love letters” from Bunny just saying something about how she enjoyed her time with Gene at the Gym.

At the bottom I would sign it “Bunny”  then under it, the printer would read the graphic commands and create a small Playboy Bunny symbol under the name.  At the end, the document would send a command that would put the printer back into the text mode.

Of course.  Whenever I walked into the control room shortly after, just to see how the precipitator was doing, Gene Day would confront me about the notes.  With a grin on his face he would say, “This isn’t funny!  What if my wife found one of these notes?”  — Like that was ever going to happen…. unless he was like me, and like to save everything.

In the last couple of weeks I have written about how the Power Plant Men were introduced to the “Quality Process” (otherwise known as “Six Sigma”).  We had created teams with our crews and we met once each week to come up with Quality ideas.  In August, 1993, I had received my official Certificate Certifying that I had completed all the QuickStart training and was on my way to making a difference in the Power Plant World!

My Customer Service Team Certificate.  This made me official!

My Customer Service Team Certificate. This made me official!

So, what do these two events have in common and how did this lead the President of the Electric Company to send out a search warrant on a lowly Plant Electrician in North Central Oklahoma?  Well.  This is what happened…

First you have to remember that in 1993, the Internet was not easily accessible by the general public.  Company e-mail was still not a reality in our company.  We had dumb terminals and large IBM printers.  That was the extent of most employees interaction with a computer.  Each printer had a designation.  It was a four character ID beginning with a “P”.  So, the  printer in the Electric Shop Office might be…. P123.  I needed to know this number if I wanted to send  something to it.

At the time, the only thing people had to send to each other were requests for things from the mainframe systems that were used to run the company.  So, for instance, if you wanted to request some parts from the warehouse at our plant, we would send over a list of parts to the warehouse printer where Dick Dale and Darlene Mitchell would pick it up and go retrieve the parts.  So, the people that used the terminals and computers with mainframe emulators on them knew the most commonly used printer numbers in the plant.

If you wanted to send something to someone in Oklahoma City, or to the Power Plant in Muskogee, then you would have to call over there and ask the person what their Printer ID is so you can be sure you are sending your request to the appropriate computer.  Without e-mail, and any other form of computerized communication.  This was the only way at the time.

So, after our Customer Service Team was formed, we would meet once each week to brainstorm new ideas that would benefit the company.  Andy Tubbs was our team leader, as he was our foreman.

Andy Tubbs - True Power Plant Electrician

Andy Tubbs – True Power Plant Electrician

The other members of our Customer Service Team were Diana Brien, Scott Hubbard, Sonny Kendrick, Ben Davis and Gary Wehunt.  I haven’t properly introduced my bucket buddy Diana Brien in a post before.  I have recently obtained a photograph that I can share:

My Bucket Buddy Diana Brien

My Bucket Buddy Diana Brien

We were called bucket buddies because we carried tool buckets with us whenever we went to work on something.  They doubled as our stool and tripled as our trash can.

Thursday, October 14, 1993 during our Quality Brainstorming session, while we were pouring out ideas like…. “What if we changed out the street lights at the plant so that they would be different colors…. wouldn’t that help morale?….   and “How about if we wrapped fluorescent Christmas lights around the high voltage electric lines between here and Oklahoma City so that they could light up the night with colorful lights during the Christmas Season?”….. And other ingenious Brainstorming ideas that are bound to pull up an occasional brilliant idea….. well.  One such idea popped up!

I don’t remember which one of our brilliant brainstorming ideas conjured up this idea, but Andy Tubbs suddenly blurted out…. “What if we had the Printer IDs added as a column in the Corporate Directory? —  You see, each quarter we received an updated copy of the Corporate Phone Book.  It included the names and phone numbers of all the Electric Company employees.  It also included their mail code.  So, if you wanted to send something through inter-company mail to them, you would know where to send it.  Our mail code was PP75.  That was the code for our power plant.

So, what if we added a column where we had the printer ID that each person would use for people to send printed requests, among other things?  This was Brilliant!  We could just make this proposal and send it downtown to Corporate Headquarters where it would be lost in the “mail”.  Or we could do more research to prove that it was a possible proposal that was really doable.

So, I suggested….  Well… I can print a form out on every printer in the entire company requesting that they include all the names of all the people on that use that printer and mail it through inter-company mail back to me at PP75.  — I had recently uncovered a special printer command that allowed me to do this hidden away on the Honeywell mainframe.  So, we took a vote and it was decided that we would pursue this proposal.  I set to work on creating the form that I would send to every printer.  If we could not only send the proposal to the Communications department downtown, but also a list of everyone and their printers, the work would already have been done for them.

I wanted to send a real fancy letter because I had already created a header using the Quality print settings on the printers.  I had created a Company Logo that (I thought) ingeniously used the backspace command to create two words with one word on top of the other in the middle of a sentence….  Our company began as Oklahoma Gas and…..  in the logo, I wanted the word Gas to be on top of the word And as it was in our company logo in smaller letters than the others.  So… after playing around with it for a while, I created the logo and had it saved on the mainframe.

After attaching the header to the form, I included a message that told the person that discovered the form on the printer to add the names of all people who used the printer below and to send the form to Kevin Breazile at PP75.  As I mentioned.  In order to make the form look pretty, I turned on the Quality Print settings on the printer at the beginning of the document.  Like the story of the Sorcerer’s Apprentice….. I didn’t know a good way to turn off all the settings I changed to revert the printers back to their original settings.

I ran the command to send the document to every printer on the print server and away they went…. A copy printed out on the  printer in the Electric Shop office so I knew it was working.  Copies printed out on the other 12 printers at our plant.  They also printed out on the 500 other printers throughout Oklahoma.  — With the thought that “My work here is done.”  I went back to work repairing plant electric equipment.

The following Monday was my birthday, so in normal Power Plant Fashion, I had the day off.  When I returned to work on Tuesday, Denise Anson called me from the front office.  She said that I had a large stack of mail.  I thought, “Oh good!”  Results from our request on Thursday have arrived!  I hurried up to the front office.

When I entered the mail cubicle I was surprised to see how big the pile of envelopes were.  The stack of inter-company envelopes was over two feet high.  “Um…. Thanks….”  I said to Denise.  I picked up the stack and headed back to the Electric Shop to sort out the forms.

After opening the first few envelopes.  I suddenly came to an astonishing discovery.  Not only did the form print out on the large mainframe IBM printers used in office areas, it also had printed out on other types of printers….  I opened one envelope and found the form printed out on a “Work Order” printer.  The paper size was different than the standard paper size, and I hadn’t put a page feed at the end of the document, so, it had left the paper in the middle of the page…. “Uh Oh”.

My “Uh Oh” changed to “UH OH!” after opening a few more of the inter-company envelopes.  I found that the form had printed out on Pay Check Printers!  And Billing Printers!  “UH OH!”  quickly changed to “OH NO!”  When I read comments like “Under no circumstances print anything on this Printer Again!!!!” I realized I had really messed things up.  By changing the font size and the quality settings, the billing, payroll and work order printers all had to be manually reset and the jobs that printed out paychecks, customer bills and employee work orders had to be re-run!

After taking all the forms out of their envelopes, the stack of papers was over 4 inches thick, just to give you an idea about how many responses we had.

A couple of hours later, Tom Gibson called me to his office. “Uh Oh.”  (remember… One “uh oh” erases all previous “atta boy”s).  When I entered Tom’s office, I could tell that something was definitely wrong.  Like I mentioned earlier.  Tom’s ears were beet red…. and in case you don’t know what a beet looks like.  Here is one:

The same color of Tom Gibson's ears

The same color of Tom Gibson’s ears

Of course… I knew what this was all about, only I didn’t know yet, how Tom had found out about it….  Tom began by saying…. “Ron Kilman just received a call from James Harlow asking him who is Kevin Breazile and why is he printing something out on my printer?  Ron didn’t like the fact that he wasn’t aware that you had sent something to the President of the Company’s printer.

 

James G. Harlow Jr.

James G. Harlow Jr.

Sorry.  That’s the biggest picture I could find of James Harlow….

Um what could I say?  So, I said this…

Well.  This was a quality idea that our team had.  We wanted to collect the names of people that used each printer so that we could send in a proposal to have the printer ID added in the Corporate Directory.

I didn’t mention that Harlow’s Secretary had returned the form with all the people that used his computer as I had requested, because I knew that the President of the Electric Company was not asking because he was upset that I had printed something out on his printer.   No.  He had probably been told that the reason the bills were late being sent to the one million customers that month was because some kook had messed up their printers and the jobs had to be run over again causing the delay.  So, I thought it was best not to go that route…

So, I stuck with my story, which was the truth…. I had printed out the forms on all the printers as part of a quality idea by our CST. — I also didn’t mention that three years earlier, Tom had asked me to learn everything I could about the company computer, because he believe that the computer was going to be the wave of the future.

Even though Tom believed my explanation, he told me…. “Kevin, Ron never wants this to happen again, therefore, you are never to send anything out of this plant without Ron Kilman’s personal approval.  Is that clear?”

I replied to Tom that this was unreasonable.  I send things to other departments all the time.  I send Substation Inspection forms, and blueprint revisions and all sorts of other forms downtown all the time.  Ron Kilman wouldn’t want to waste his time approving all those things….

Tom thought about it and revised his statement…. “Then, don’t ever send out anything that isn’t part of your normal daily job without Ron’s approval first.”  — Ok.  I thought…. this works, since everything I do is part of my normal daily job…. Even printing out forms on all the printers in the company… since that was part of our normal “Quality Process” Customer Service Team activity….  So, I happily agreed.  And I left Tom’s office happy that I hadn’t joined the ranks of the unemployed.

That was one thing about working at the plant at this time.  As long as your heart was in the right place….  That is, you tried your best to keep the electricity humming through the electric lines…. then the chances of being fired for messing up, even as big of a mess up as this, most often didn’t end up by losing your job.

I sometimes think that this was my biggest mess up of all time… however…. after this episode was over… there was a part two to this story….. Believe it or not…. Someone else in the company was overjoyed about what I had just done.  They had been trying to do something similar for a long time, only to be told that it was impossible. — Doing the Impossible… I was good at that… Part two of this story is a story for another day…

Power Plant Humor and Joking with Gene Day — Repost

This is a revised version of a post that was originally posted on 1/14/2012:

What sets power plant men apart from your regular mechanic, lineman or men of other occupations is that they are a semi-captive group of people with a lot of freedom to move about the plant and the plant grounds.  This provides for the opportunity to play jokes on each other without resorting to “horseplay”.  There is no room for horseplay at a power plant.  The power plant man lives among dangerous equipment, poisonous chemicals, carcinogenic dust, asbestos gloves and purely evil plant managers who would love to catch one of his minions engaging in horseplay.

The more elaborate yet simple joke seems to have the best effect on those who find themselves the victim.  First of all, the joke must be essentially harmless.  That is, no one is left injured (this rule seems to be more of a suggestion since I seemed to end up on the short end of the stick a few times).  Secondly,  the longer the joke takes to completion, the better.  If the joke goes on for a week or longer, then the final impact of the joke is much greater.  For instance.  A person that you are going to play a joke on sits in a chair that is raised an lowered by turning the chair upside down and twisting the wheel bracket around (which is how you lowered office chairs before the fancier spring and air cushioned chairs arrived).  Say you were to gradually lower a person’s chair each day by 1/8 of an inch or so.  Eventually, in a couple of weeks, the person will be sitting lower and lower at their desk until one day they get frustrated at sitting so low that they turn their chair over and raise the chair higher.  But each day, you keep lowering the chair by just a little bit until they are sitting so low again that they complain about it again and raise the chair up.  This can go on indefinitely.  The more people that know the joke is being played, the better in this instance.

The first time I met Gene Day, I knew that he was someone that would be fun to play jokes on.  I don’t know what it was about him exactly.  It wasn’t that he appeared to have a lower IQ.  On the contrary.  He seemed to be very knowledgeable as Control Room operators go.  Maybe it was because he seemed like a happy person that took most things rather lightly.  He wouldn’t be the type of person that would hold something against you just because you made him look foolish in front of his peers.  It seemed like the first time I noticed Gene Day, he was standing in the Control Room and I gave him a look like I was suspicious of him and he returned the look with one that said that he knew that I might be the type of person that would play a joke on him.  This surprised me, because I thought I had masked that look pretty well.

Gene Day is the one standing on the right with the Orange shirt.

Gene Day is the one standing on the right with the Orange shirt.  See what I mean about he has a face that says it would be great to play a joke on him?

Throughout my 20 years of power plant life I played many jokes on Gene Day, and each time it seems that I was throttled to the edge of extinction, which meant that I had executed the joke perfectly.  It seemed that each person had a different way of expressing their joy of finding out that they have been the victim of a power plant joke.

My favorite Gene Day joke was not one that took a long time to execute, and from the time that I conceived the idea to the time that I was being strangled by Gene Day was a mere 15 hours.

It began when I was driving home from work one day on my way down Sixth Street in Stillwater Oklahoma where I lived on the west end of town at the time.  Gene Day was an operator and their shift was over an hour and a half before the rest of the plant.  As I drove down Sixth Street about a block ahead of me, I saw Gene Day’s truck pull away from the Rock House Gym travelling in the same direction.  Gene had a black pickup with flames on the side…. Something left over from High School I think…  The only one in town like it.

Gene Day's truck was similar to this only different, with a different pattern of flames and a newer type of truck

Gene Day’s truck was similar to this only different, with a different pattern of flames and a newer type of truck

I kept an eye on his truck to see where he went, and as he passed the Stillwater Hospital he pulled into an Eye Clinic and parked in the parking lot.   I drove on past and pulled into my driveway about 3 blocks further on.  As I checked my mail I decided to go to the bank to deposit some checks I had received.  I returned to my car and pulled my car out of the driveway and headed back into town.

Gene Day turned onto Sixth Street in front of me again as he left the Eye Clinic and proceeded to go down Sixth street in front of me.  So again I watched him to see where he went.  Just as I came to Duck Street, I saw Gene Day pull his truck into the Simon’s Gas Station on the corner of Duck and Sixth.  He had pulled his truck up to the garage instead of the pumps, so I figured that he was getting his truck inspected.  I turned on Duck street to go to the bank drive-thru about a block away from the gas station.

After taking care of my banking business, I left the bank and headed back home toward Sixth Street.  I arrived at the corner of Sixth Street just in time to see Gene Day pulling out of the gas station and heading off in the opposite direction.  I thought that he hadn’t been at the gas station very long so he probably had just had his truck inspected.

The next morning when I arrived at the plant I walked by Gene Day’s truck on the way to the electric shop and I looked to see if he had a new Safety Inspection sticker.  He didn’t have any Safety Inspection sticker which meant that his truck had failed the inspection.

Armed with this information when I arrived in the electric shop I took out a yellow pad of paper and proceeded to write the following:

Private Investigator’s Notes for Gene Day:

Date:  5/14/91

3:05  Gene Day leaves work.

3:45 Gene Day arrives at Rockhouse Gym where he works out with a young college coed named Bunny.

5:05 Gene Day leaves Rockhouse Gym.

5:07 Gene Day arrives at Cockrell Eye Care Center  where he meets with a nurse in his pickup truck in the parking lot.

5:20 Gene Day leaves Eye Care Center.

5:25 Gene Day arrives at Simon’s Garage at the corner of Sixth and Duck and has them clean his pickup seats to remove the perfume scent.  While he was there, he tried to have his pickup inspected, but it didn’t pass inspection.

5:33 Gene Day leaves Simon’s Garage and goes home.

I folded the paper in half and after I began work, I headed to the Control Room to see how the Electrostatic Precipitator was doing.  I sat at the computer by the Control Room door that opened up to the Turbine Generator room.  After a while Gene Day walked by on his way to pick up the mail from the front office.  I waited about 30 seconds and followed him out onto the Turbine Generator (T-G) floor.  The T-G floor at Sooner Plant is painted bright red and the floor is kept clean so that the lights overhead reflect off of the floor.

This is a picture of the red turbine room floor, only not with the nice wax job

This is a picture of the red turbine room floor

The Control Room is halfway across this large room about 200 yards long.  The office area is at one end.   I walked over to the door that leads to the Office area and laid the half folded paper in the middle of the floor.   I figured that Gene wouldn’t be able to resist picking it up to see what it said.  Then I went back to the Control Room and leaned against one of the big blue monitors used by the Control Room Operators to view alarms.

After a few minutes, Gene Day walked into the Control room.  In one arm he carried various parcels of mail.  In the other hand, he was carrying the yellow paper I had left for him to find.  He was violently shaking it at me yelling, “How did you do this?!?!”  I acted surprised as if I didn’t know what he was talking about.  Somehow he figured I was behind this, but for the life of me.  I don’t know why….  He tried to explain to me that he had stopped to see his wife who is a nurse at the Cockrell Eye Care Clinic, and that there wasn’t any girl named Bunny.  He couldn’t figure out how I would know that he tried to get his truck inspected and it failed inspection….  I insisted that I didn’t know what he was talking about.  About that time, the room became blurry as my head was shaking back and forth, and I came to the realization that this joke had been performed perfectly.