Tag Archives: Electrician

Letters to the Power Plant #98 — The Boiler Ghost

After I left the power plant and went to work for Dell on August 20, 2001, I wrote letters back to my friends at the plant letting them know how things were going.  This is the ninety eighth letter I wrote.  Keep in mind that at the time when I originally penned this letter I didn’t intend on it being posted online.

4/13/04 – The Boiler Ghost

Dear Friends from Sooner Plant and others,

Kelly was cleaning out our closet over the weekend, and she ran across some old papers from my former life at Sooner Plant.  She asked me if she could throw them out, so I sifted through them, and I ran across a piece of paper that was folded up and all stained with Fly Ash.  When I opened it, I found that it was a short story that I had written when I was on Labor Crew 21 years ago.  I had written it for Bob Lillibridge.

When we were on Labor Crew and we had to work in the Economizer tubes cleaning the caked up ash with Cross-cut saws welded end on end, we would climb into the small crawl space halfway down the tubes to spread the tubes from below.  Bob used to grab Ronnie Banks by the legs and Yell, “Boiler Ghost!!!”  Ronnie Banks had Claustrophobia, and it would throw him into a panic.  So I had written this story to Bob.

It went like this:

From the darkness of the boiler it came.

The Boiler Ghost, black, enormous, full of hate.

I watched with disbelief as it edged its way along.

Its eyes, red and piercing, with a stare of terror

It glanced first this way and then that.

As its eyes passed through me I was filled with

Such a terrible fright that I felt near the point of death.

The massive head hung down between two pointed

Shoulder blades vulture-like.

The most terrifying thing of all was the gaping mouth

That hung open.

It was full of such a terrible darkness,

So dark and evil as if it were the gates of Hell.

Just then I noticed its eyes had fixed on Bob.

Bob Lillibridge.

He was pressed against the wall by the piercing stare,

His mouth open wide as if to scream.

Eyes bulging out in utter terror.

Mindless with pure fright.

I tried to scream, but felt such a choking force

On my throat I could make no noise.

With steady movement the monster advanced toward Bob.

Bob was white as ash staring into that dark empty mouth.

Smoke poured out of a flat nose on that horrid face.

It reached out a vile and tremendous hand

And grabbed Bob,

Who burst into flames at his touch.

In one movement he was gone.

Vanished into the mouth of pure darkness.

The Evil Ghost glanced first this way, then that,

And into the darkness of the boiler it went.

All was quiet,

The roar of the boiler told me I was safe once again.

Until the boiler ghost should decide to return.

Kevin James Anthony Breazile

______________________

Kevin J. Breazile

Programmer/Analyst III

Dell Inc.

(512) 728-1527

 

Letters to the Power Plant #97 — Dell-ivering Quality

After I left the power plant and went to work for Dell on August 20, 2001, I wrote letters back to my friends at the plant letting them know how things were going.  This is the ninety seventh letter I wrote.  Keep in mind that at the time when I originally penned this letter I didn’t intend on it being posted online.

4/9/04 – Dell-ivering Quality

Hey friends at Sooner Plant and “beyond”,

So.  I heard the big news yesterday.  I heard that the Illustrious Sooner Plant Manager has decided to throw in the towel and call it quits.  I wonder what changed his mind?  Has he had a change of heart?  Does his wife know about this?  I guess she knew it would come to this “Sooner” or later.

That reminds me of my mom.  A few weeks ago, my dad mentioned that he was thinking of retiring.  He’s going to turn 70 this December.  He was thinking that it was time to start collecting his retirement and relax a little. —  Needless to say, my mom talked him out of it “really” quickly.

I can still remember the dumbfounded look Mrs. Godfrey had on her face when we were having the big retirement party during the first downsizing and Leroy Godfrey was retiring.  His daughter stood up and said, “I can imagine that it must have been difficult to work with Leroy, but remember, I had to LIVE with him!!” (followed by cheers and uproarious laughter)

Note to Reader:  To learn more about Leroy Godfrey’s retirement party, see the post The Passing of an Old School Power Plant Man — Leroy Godfrey.

I suppose that’s the reason that Jim Arnold is still around.  Could you imagine what his wife must say whenever he mentions retiring?

Maybe Bill Green is just going to surprise his wife the day he retires.  —  I can hear it now:  “Honeykins.  Don’t you think you should get up and go to work?  It’s already 6 am.”  “Why no, my dearest cherub (I’m sure that’s what Bill Green calls his wife), I’m not going to work anymore.  I’ve retired.”  “Did you say you re……….AAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!”  Get Up Right Now and go find another job!!!  I don’t care what you do!  Go be a greeter at Wal-Mart!!!!

Anyway.  I realize that it has been over three weeks since I wrote last.  It only seems like a couple of days.  I’ve been in a time warp working on a whole bunch of little projects all at the same time.

I think I broke a record this week on the shortest project in the history of our team.  It lasted for about 4 hours.  Then it was cancelled.  That was quick.

Yesterday, the program manager that I had for the big Kronos project came by my cubicle and said,  “Boy, you are sure getting popular among the PMs.”  I asked her why and she said that everyone was trying to get me on their projects.  I think it’s because I like to do paperwork, and they think if they get me on their team that I will do all of their paperwork for them.

I understand that you guys are just finishing up with Overhaul.  I hope everyone was safe and no one was hurt.

Well.  I better get back to work.  This typing up paperwork on the computer is really an experience.  —  Whatever happened to “Writing Programs?”  Oh that’s right.  We do that in India now.

Your friendly Dell programmer,

Kevin James Anthony Breazile

______________________

Kevin J. Breazile

Global Financial Systems I/T

Dell Inc.

(512) 728-1527

Letters to the Power Plant #70 — Team Building at Dell Computer Corporation

After I left the power plant and went to work for Dell on August 20, 2001, I wrote letters back to my friends at the plant letting them know how things were going.  This is the seventieth letter I wrote.  Keep in mind that at the time when I originally penned this letter I didn’t intend on it being posted online.

3/28/03  — Team Building at Dell Computer Corporation

Dear Soonerites (and Laterites),

Well.  It’s Friday afternoon, and a number of people around me are gone because they went to their “Team-builder” Activity today.  Gee.  My last team-builder must have been pretty boring.  I can’t even remember what it was.   —-  Oh yeah.  I looked it up in my Outlook calendar.  It was when we went to the “Adult Arcade” place and I sat in that “Electric chair”.  — No wonder I didn’t remember.

I remember now walking around for hours after that experience looking like that frizzy-haired guy on Seinfeld.  Well.  We had a meeting the other day to discuss where our team is going to go on our next outing —  Oh.  Did I say “Outing?.”    I meant to say ” …our next company-sponsored corporate team-building event.”  We decided to go to this place called “Fiesta Texas”.  It’s in San Antonio.  It is a Six Flags Theme park.

We already discussed some of the different team-building activities we are going to take part in while we’re there, but we’re up for suggestions I’m sure.  We thought our whole team would get on one of the bigger roller coasters all at the same time, and then when we go over the hills, we’ll raise our hands in the air and act like a bunch of cool frat boys and sorority girls by hooting and hollering some such slogan like “Dude, You’re getting’ a Dell!”.  We figure that will get us in the team-building spirit.

The team decided that only those people who took part in this particular team-building activity would be given their “lunch voucher.”   That way, they figured that we would have full participation.  —  I’m not really sure that I will want to eat lunch after that anyway, but I suppose I’ll go on it.  That way everyone can yell,  “Hey!  Look at that ‘Old Man’ riding on that Roller Coaster!  Doesn’t he look funny with all of that stuff all over his shirt and face, and ….eeuuuww, is that what I think it is!?!”

We’re going to carpool down there since it will take about an hour and a half or so.  I was able to con someone into driving me by promising them that I will tell them stories about the place where I used to work.  I think everyone likes hearing stories about when I worked at this great big power plant full of all this equipment and these great people who used to do the funniest things.

I can only remember a few funny things, but that’s ok.  You guys know how it is when you get older.  You start telling the same ol’ stories over and over again.  —  I wonder how many times these guys down here have heard the story about Bud Schoonover the Tool Room guy and how he would never let you have something if it was the last one he had so he would never have to order any more of anything?  Or the story about how I played this trick on Gene Day, and it turned out to be so funny that I almost died laughing before Gene could choke me to death.

Note to reader:  To learn more about Bud Schoonover read the post Elvin Power Plant Tool Room Adventures with Bud.

To Read more about Gene Day choking me, see this post:  Psychological Profile of a Power Plant Control Room Operator and Power Plant Humor and Joking with Gene Day.

You know what?  I just realized something.  Do you remember how I went to a team-builder last year and I had to tell them stuff about myself, and I told them that the two most interesting people in the world that I knew was Walt Oswalt and Bud Schoonover?  Well, since that time, there are only two other people on my team that were on my team back then.  — We reorganize a lot down here.  —  Anyway.  You know what that means?  That means that I can tell the same ol’ stories over again and most of the team will not have heard it before!  Boy.  This is easier than I thought.

Well.  We’re planning on going to our Team-builder event on April 17th, so if one of you guys want to come down and meet me there, that would be great.  Especially if we can stage a great team-building event right in front of the Roller coaster ride just before we are supposed to get on, where you act like you’re having a heart attack, and I administer First Aid to you, and check your pulse, and shake your shoulders and say, “I’m medically trained.  I can help you.”

And I can whip out a stethoscope and start listening to your lungs and looking off into space like I’m really trying to listen to that gurgling noise when you breathe.  —  That way, everyone will go on the Roller coaster ride and leave me behind to take care of you, and I’ll be able to hear them going over the hills yelling with their hands up in the air, while I’ll be rolling over laughing because they will think that I was being some kind of “hero”, when actually I was just doing what we used to do when we took those CPR courses every year.

Oh.  My manager, just walked by my cube and asked me if I’m rambling again.  —  How does he know?  —  He must be Psychic!!!  —  It must be all that “Team-building” vibes I was sending out.

Well.  I guess I’ve rambled on long enough.  When you see Gene Day, tell him I said “Hi”.  —  He gets a copy of this e-mail, so he’ll know why, but it would still be a great “Team-building” event if everyone would just do something special for him today.  —  Don’t you think?  Just say something like “Hi Gene!!!!  I think you’re a really Great Guy!!!  Oh,  by the way.  Kevin says ‘Hi’.”

Write and let me know how things are going.  I guess you guys are starting Overhaul this weekend, unless the finger-crossing didn’t work and you had to start it early.  Let me know what’s happenin’.

Your pal from down south,

Kevin James Anthony Breazile

______________________

Kevin J. Breazile

Dell Computer Corporation

(512) 728-1527

Letters to the Power Plant #56 — Programmers in a Dell Cubicle

After I left the power plant and went to work for Dell on August 20, 2001, I wrote letters back to my friends at the plant letting them know how things were going.  This is the fifty sixth letter I wrote.  Keep in mind that at the time when I originally penned this letter I didn’t intend on it being posted online.

10/25/02 – Programmers in a Dell Cubicle

Dear friends from the “Northern Plains”,

Well.  I hope everything is going well with all of you.  We have been having rain here all week.  It’s supposed to rain all weekend and then rain all next week, so I have been getting the feeling that I am living in Seattle, instead of Austin.

You would think it would be fairly dry in Austin, (except maybe for an occasional hurricane or something).  Anyway.  For those of you who don’t read this until Monday morning —  I hope you turned your clock back.  After all….. This is the weekend where we get to sleep for one more hour.

This week I started moving people into my cubicle to work on a project with them.  I thought, just for fun, we would see how many people we could cram into one little cubicle with their computers all working away.  We could only get 4 chairs and 5 computers in here at one time.

It was a neat experiment, and some people were falling out into the aisle.  —  But you should have seen the great team-building efforts that were going on.  I had everyone’s name tag (which are made out of magnets), all stuck on my cubicle.  —  Well.  It’s Friday afternoon, and everyone has left, so I have pushed out two of the chairs, and made some room so that I can stretch out and relax while I write this letter to you guys.

Oh, by the way.  I have recently become an Excel Programming Expert.  I can now write programs that can do all sorts of stuff with Excel Spreadsheets.  —  No.  Not just the normal “Macro” stuff.  I mean the real “Programming” stuff.

This one project that I’m working on pulls data from another application, and does a bunch of calculations on it, and sticks them into different Excel Spreadsheets.  Then it takes information from other Excel Sheets and puts them in there as well.  So, I told one guy that has been working on that project with me that we should write a book about programming for Excel (“The Real” stuff).  Because a lot of this stuff isn’t documented anywhere and there isn’t really a place to go to learn how to do this.  —  It has been fun….. Of course.

On Monday we’re supposed to dress up in a Halloween costume, and have a party after lunch.  I’m not sure what I should dress up as.  —  No, wait.  I know.  How about if I put on some steel-toed boots, and wear some dirty old jeans, and a grungy tee-shirt, and put on a scratched up old hardhat and carry a 5 gallon tool bucket and go as an “Electrician From Hell!!!!!”  That should most certainly be scary!!!!

The only problem with that, is that I might get dirty.  I’m sure you guys already know that I don’t like to get dirty.  That’s why I took this job…. Remember.

Anyway.  All is going well with my family.  We are all waiting for the Dove to return with an olive branch so that we know it will be safe to go outside again after the waters recede.  I’ll write to you guys later.  Let me know how things are going.

Your Friendly Dell Programmer,

Kevin James Anthony Breazile

______________________

Kevin J. Breazile

CIA: Customer Experience, Integrated Services Model, and Ariba

–CIA, we work behind the scenes so you don’t have to–

Dell Computer Corporation

(512) 728-1527

Letters to the Power Plant #6 – Meeting with the CIO

After I left the power plant and went to work for Dell on August 20, 2001, I wrote letters back to my friends at the plant letting them know how things were going.  This is the sixth letter I wrote.  Keep in mind that at the time, I didn’t intend on it being posted online when I originally penned this letter.

09/28/01 – Meeting with the CIO

Dear Sooner plant,

I went to a meeting with Randy Mott this morning, our Chief Information Officer (CIO), who, by the way, was named “CIO of the Year” in the world this year.  I think it was a productive meeting.  The first thing that I noticed was that his cubicle was TWICE as big as mine.  Yes.  He does NOT have an office.  He works in a cubicle just like everyone else.  Even Michael Dell, the CEO of the company has a cubicle.  Michael doesn’t even keep a chair in his cubicle, He works standing up at a drafting table. — And Dell is more than 20 times bigger than OG&E!!!!

Anyway, back to the meeting with Randy Mott.  He told me that he thought I would have to stop doing the mouse in the sock thing because it was shocking my coworkers.  I told him that I thought they would get used to it, and that they might even start doing it themselves.  He said,  “No, I don’t think you understand.  You are “shocking” your coworkers!!!”

Apparently, by rubbing my socks on the carpet when I move my mouse around, I am putting a static charge on the cubicles, and when my coworkers lean against their desks, they are getting shocked.  — It was at this point in the conversation that I learned that our CIO was named “CIO of the year” and that Randy was rather proud of this accomplishment (which he should be).

I thought about telling him that if the cubicles were properly grounded this wouldn’t happen, but I decided not to mention it.  So I suggested that maybe I could wear grounding bracelets around my ankles to bleed off the static charge.  He told me he knew I used to be an Electrician, but that I should find some other way to manipulate my mouse, or that I should learn to use the “hot keys” like most programmers do.  (You see, Randy Mott used to be a programmer at Wal-Mart where he worked his way up to CIO, so he knows about those sorts of things — this was something else I learned about Randy in our meeting).

Why of course!!!  Hot keys!!!  That is when you press the CTRL-C to copy, and CTRL-V to paste, and things like that.  There is a “Hot Key” for just about every operation.  The advantage of that is that you don’t have to take your fingers off of the home row keys, and it doesn’t slow you down.  —  So I returned to my cubicle feeling rather foolish and put my unused scissors back in my drawer, and pulled my socks off of both mice and slipped them back on my feet.

Then my Vice President came by and said, “Hey lets go out to lunch!”  So he took all the new guys that were under him (6 of us) out to lunch.  We went to a Mexican restaurant named, “On The Border”.  I was thinking the whole time, “Oh No, not another one of these torturous meals where we get so stuffed that we can’t move, then we have to do some sort of physical activity to make us barf it all back up again.”  — But that didn’t happen.

We spent so much time talking that we didn’t eat that much.  So even though we sat there for an hour and a half, and kept eating chips and salsa, we didn’t get too stuffed.  —  When I got back to work my whole team and a couple of other teams were all throwing a football around in an area in our building across from our cubicles that is the size of the entire maintenance shop at Sooner, except without any furniture.  I realized that if I had eaten too much for lunch this activity would have been devastating and I was wondering if that had been intentional.

They were handing out free root beer, so I drank some of that.  — I also found out that I had missed their breakfast this morning because I had that meeting with Randy Mott, but I had lunch and they didn’t, so it kind of made up for that.  It turns out that every Friday they have breakfast for us and they call it “The Breakfast Club” and everyone dresses any way they want and they call it “Casual Friday”.

Anyway.  That is how my day went.  The weekend is here, and I am done for the day, and my Manager just walked by my cubicle and said, “Hey I thought I told you that you could leave early.”  So, I suppose I should go home.

I would still like to hear how things are going up there, so keep me informed.  I sent this with the mailing list as a blind copy, that way you shouldn’t have to have a header with everyone’s name listed on it, let me know if that worked.  If anything it may have Ray’s name listed on it, since I don’t have him on the long mailing list, (mainly because I never heard back from him when I was making it – but I thought he would appreciate the reference I made to Walt Oswalt in the update from last week).  — Is Ray doing ok?

Kevin Breazile

Programmer/Analyst II

(512) 728-1527

Power Plant Downsizing Disaster and the Left Behinds

Originally posted December 27, 2014:

The Power Plant Men and Women knew that a major downsizing was going to occur throughout the company on Friday, July 29, 1994.  The upper management had already experienced the preliminary stages of this particular downsizing since it started at the top.  Over a four month period that started with an early retirement, it worked its way down the ranks until the actual Power Plant Men at the plant in North Central Oklahoma were going to be downsized on that one day.

The people that had taken the early retirement (which was available for anyone 50 years and older) had already left a couple of months earlier.  Since the downsizing was being decided from the top down, we soon learned that our Plant Manager Ron Kilman would no longer be a Plant Manager.  He was too young to take the early retirement.  I believe he was 47 at the time.

The person taking Ron’s place was Bill Green, a guy that was old enough to take the early retirement, but decided to stay.  Bill was 53 years old at the time.  Perhaps he knew in advance that he had a secure position before the deadline to choose the early retirement.

The final week when the downsizing was going to take place, several things were happening that made the entire week seem surreal (this is a word that means — sort of weird and unnatural).  I was spending the week in the old Brown and Root building because we were busy training everyone at the plant about Confined Space Safety and the OSHA regulations that we had to follow.

We had to have all the OSHA training completed by August 1 in order to avoid the fines that OSHA had given us back in April (See the post:  “Power Plant Men Summoned by Department of Labor“).  We had formed a confined space rescue team and taken the required Confined Space training (see the post “Finding and Defining Power Plant Confined Spaces“).  We were using the old training room in the old Brown and Root Building because we wanted it to be away from the plant area where the foremen wouldn’t be bothered while they were taking their class.

The first day of training, Ben Brandt the assistant plant manager was in the the class.  He was going to be a plant manager at another plant, I think it was the plant in Seminole county.

Seminole Power Plant at night outside of Konawa Oklahoma. This picture was found at: http://www.redbubble.com/people/harrietrn/works/1425122-seminole-power-plant

Seminole Power Plant at night outside of Konawa Oklahoma. This picture was found at: http://www.redbubble.com/people/harrietrn/works/1425122-seminole-power-plant

I could tell that Ben was not interested in being in the training, and given all that was going down that week, I could see why.  We would say something in the class about how you had to fill out your confined space permit and turn it in to the Control Room, and Ben would shake his head in disagreement as if he didn’t think that was ever going to happen….  Well, times were changing in more ways than one that week.

Tuesday afternoon was when things really began to get weird….  We knew that Friday would be the last day for a bunch of Power Plant Men, but we didn’t yet know who.  During the previous downsizing in 1987 and 1988, we at least knew who was going to leave months before they actually had to leave.  Now we were down to just a few days and we still didn’t know who had a job come August 1 (next Monday).

On Tuesday afternoon, one at a time, someone would be paged on the Gaitronics Gray Phone (the plant PA system) by one of the four foremen that had survived.

Gray Phone Speaker

Gray Phone Speaker

We were cutting the number of first line foremen in Maintenance from 13 down to 4 and getting completely rid of two levels of management.  So, that we would no longer have an A foremen and a Supervisor over each group.  So, we wouldn’t have a position like an Electric Supervisor or a Mechanical Maintenance Supervisor.

Our new foremen were Andy Tubbs,

Andy Tubbs - True Power Plant Electrician

Andy Tubbs – True Power Plant Electrician

Alan Kramer,

Alan Kramer

Alan Kramer

Charles Patten

Charles Patton

Charles Patton

and Mark Fielder.

Mark Fielder

Mark Fielder (actually, Mike Vogle was the foreman.  Mark Fielder changed roles with him some time after the Re-org)

All great guys!

So, when one of them would page someone on the Gray Phone, we knew that they were going to be asked to meet them upstairs in the main office somewhere.  Then they were told that they had a position on that person’s team.

So, picture this scenario.  About 160 of the original 218 employees were waiting to learn their fate that week (the rest had retired).  It was late Tuesday afternoon when Alan Hetherington told us that they had already begun calling operators to the office to tell them they had jobs.  They were not calling anyone to tell them that they didn’t have a job.  So, when you heard someone’s name being called, then you knew they were safe (well…. safe is a relative term).

On Wednesday just before lunch, I was called to the office by Alan Kramer.  He told me he was going to be my new foreman.  I hadn’t really worried about it up to that point, because, well, I just figured that I was pretty well irreplaceable since there really wasn’t anyone else that would go climbing around inside the precipitators during overhauls, so they would want to keep me around for that reason alone.

With that said, it was at least a little less stressful to actually have been told that I did have a position.  After all, I had caused so much trouble the previous few years (see 50% of the posts I have written to find out how), enough for some people to hold grudges against me.  So, I did have this small doubt in the back of my head that worried about that.

Alan Kramer explained to me that we would no longer have teams for each area of expertise.  We wouldn’t have teams of electricians or Instrument and Controls, or Testing, etc.  We would be cross-functional teams.  We would learn more about that next Monday.

When I returned to the Brown and Root building, the rest of the confined space team asked me if I had a job.  I told them I did.  At this point, all work at the plant seemed to have ceased.  Everyone was waiting around to receive a call on the Gray Phone.

At first, we thought this was going to be like the first downsizing where each person was called to the office and told if they had a job or they didn’t have a job.  By Wednesday afternoon, it became apparent that things weren’t working out that way.  The only people being called to the office were people that were being told they did have a job.  No one was being told if they didn’t.

Either this was a cruel joke being played on the Power Plant Men and Women, or the management hadn’t really thought about the consequences of doing this.  It became apparent right away to everyone including those that had been told they had a position that this was a terrible way to notify people about their future.  What about those that hadn’t been called to the front office?  What were they supposed to think?

About half of the Power Plant Men had received the call, when it seemed that the calls had just stopped some time on Thursday morning.  We had finished our last training session in the Brown and Root building and we were just meeting as a team to discuss our next steps in creating Confined Space rescue plans.  We were not making much progress, as everyone was just sitting around in a mild state of shock staring into space.

Alan Hetherington had not been called, so he figured that he wouldn’t have a job after Friday.  We discussed other people that were being left out.  No one on Gerald Ferguson’s team at the coal yard had been called (which included Alan).  We later heard that Gerald Ferguson, all distraught that his team had been wiped out was in disbelief that they had let his entire team go.  He blamed it on the fact that his team had refused to participate in the Quality Process since it was deemed “voluntary”.

By Thursday afternoon, the stress became so bad for some that they had gone to Jim Arnold and asked him point blank if they had a job after Friday and he refused to say anything to them.  Preston Jenkins became so stressed out that he had to go home early because he was too sick with stress.

We knew that Bill Green was the new plant manager.

 

Bill Green

Bill Green

Jim Arnold was the new Supervisor of Operations  and Jasper Christensen was the Supervisor of Maintenance.  It seemed to us as if the downsizing was being orchestrated by Jim Arnold, as he was the one going all over the plant on Thursday and Friday coordinating things.

When we came into the office on Friday morning, all the radios had been taken from the electric shop office.  I was asked to go up to the logic room and shutdown the Gray phone system.  It became clear that Jim Arnold didn’t want anyone listening to what was going on throughout the day.

Jim Arnold in all of his awesomeness

Jim Arnold in all of his awesomeness

It was normal having Highway Patrol at the plant, because they were the regular plant guards at the front gate, but today there were a lot of them, and they were in uniform.  They were escorting people off of the plant grounds one at a time.  We were told that we were not supposed to interact with people being escorted off of the plant grounds.  We weren’t supposed to approach them to even say goodbye.

It took the entire day to escort people out of the plant this way.  It was very dehumanizing that great Power Plant Men who we had all worked alongside for years were suddenly being treated as if they were criminals and were being escorted off of the plant grounds by armed Highway Patrolmen.

It was just as devastating for those that were left behind.  This was a clear indication that those people treating our friends this way were going to be our new supervisors (not our immediate foremen) and that they had a warped sense of superiority.  They may have justified their actions in their minds in order to sleep at night, but the reality was that at least one person involved in this extraction of humanity was relishing in his new found power.

No one had been more left behind than the plant manager, Ron Kilman who was too young to accept the retirement package.

Ron Kilman

Ron Kilman

He knew he didn’t have a future with the company for the past couple of months as this entire saga had been unfolding at the plant.  During the early retirement party for those that were leaving before the slaughter took place, Ron (an avid airplane pilot) had worn a shirt that said, “Will Fly for Food”, which he revealed by opening his outer shirt while introducing some of the retirees.  This had brought an applause that was reminiscent of the first day he had arrived some seven years earlier when he told a joke during his first meeting with the plant.

There were those at the plant that had reason to dislike Ron for specific decisions that he had made during his tenure at the plant.  One that comes to mind (that I haven’t already written about) is when Ray Eberle’s house was on fire and he left the plant to go fight the fire and make sure his family was safe.  Ron docked his pay for the time he was not on the plant grounds since he wasn’t a member of the voluntary fire department.  Ron has admitted since that time that there were certain decisions he made while he was Plant Manager that he would have changed if he could.

I felt as if I understood Ron, and knew that he was a good person that wanted to do the right thing.  I also knew there were times when a Plant Manager had to make unpopular decisions.  I also knew from my own experience that Ron, like everyone else was just as much human as the rest of us, and would occasionally make a decision he would later regret.  The times when Ron tried docking my pay after working long overtime hours, I just worked around it by taking vacation to keep my overtime and figured that he was playing the role of Plant Manager and following the rules the way he saw fit.

Some time shortly after lunch, Ron came into the electric shop office and sat down.  This was the first time in those seven years that he had come just for a visit and it was on his last day working for the company.  Ron just didn’t know what to do.

He explained that no one had told him anything.  No one had officially told him to leave.  No one had escorted him off of the plant grounds.  He wasn’t sure how he was supposed to make his exit.  Was he just supposed to go to his car and drive out the gate and never return?  No one told him anything.

The way Ron Kilman was treated Friday, July 29, 1994, was a clear representation of the type of people that were left in charge next Monday morning on August 1.  The entire plant knew this in their heart.  As much grief that was felt by the people being escorted out of the gate after years of loyal service to their company, those that were left behind felt every bit of that grief.

This was the darkest day in the history of the Power plant in North Central Oklahoma.  The Power Plant Men left behind by this experience were negatively effected for years after that day.  There was a bitterness and sorrow that took a long time to recover in their hearts.

The worst part of the event was that it was so unnecessary.  We understood that we had to downsize.  We had accepted that some of us would be leaving.  Each person at our plant had a level of decency that would accept the fact that when the time came for them to leave, they would hug their friends, say goodbye and with the help of each other, the rest would help them carry their stuff to their car and say goodbye.

We were all robbed of this opportunity.  Everyone, even those left behind, were suddenly treated as if we were criminals.  We had a “Black Friday” at the plant before, on February 15, 1985 (see the post “Power Plant Snitch“).  This time the impact was ten times worse.

All I can say to those who made the decision to handle the layoff this way is:  “Shame on you!  What would your Mother think if she knew what you did?”

From Pioneers to Power Plant Managers

Originally posted December 28, 2013:

Times were changing in 1987 when the electric company in Oklahoma decided that they needed to downsize the company in order to change with the new business environment.  I always seemed to think that the executives down at corporate headquarters in Oklahoma City knew that the old pioneers in charge of the Power Plants would be very difficult customers when it came to the new business model.

Like I said…. Times were changing.  The digital era was being introduced to the power industry.  We had already upgraded the precipitator controls to make them computerized.  Other areas of the plant were going to be next.  Especially the employees.  Of course, none of us knew that quite yet, except Bill Rivers, who was a natural visionary, and he was gone.

Side story time:

I had always been interested in computers and programming from the time I was a sophomore in High School when I had just turned 15 years old.  My friend Jesse Cheng had introduced me to one of the first programmable calculators, the HP-25.

Hewlett Packard 25

The HP-25 calculator

This was the most wonderful Christmas present I had ever received.  I literally felt myself fainting when I opened the present and found that I had been given a pair of cowboy boots, only to find an HP-25 calculator inside when I opened it up.  Ralphie had nothing on me that day.

It was much like the Christmas Story with Ralphie.  I had tried every with way to convince my parents that using a slide rule in High School was passe (pronounced “pass A”).  All the other students in my advanced chemistry class were using calculators, and I was still stuck with my dad’s old circular slide rule.  It was a pretty neat one, I’ll grant you that, but it just… well….. I could work things out on paper faster than I could use the slide rule.

The Gilson Atlas circular slide rule I used in High School

The Gilson Atlas circular slide rule I used in High School

I introduced my friend Jesse Cheng in the post “Why Do Power Plant Men Always Lose the Things They Love Most“.  He had an HP-25 calculator and had loaned it to me to take a Chemistry test.  He showed me how it used Reverse Polish Notation, which is different than a normal calculator, but more like a computer.

The calculator could be programmed with 49 steps.  Because it had a stack built right into it, and the reason it used Reversed Polish Notation, we could create all sorts of games with just those 49 steps.  The book that came with the calculator had a moon landing game.  We made more sophisticated games, like one called Battleship.

Anyway.  Because of this early exposure with actually programming something in a logical manner, I was eager to learn more about programming.  During college, my calculator was often sitting on my desk in the dorm room running a long program to help me perfect a random number generator.  Finally in my Junior year in college, my calculator was completely fried.

After I was married at the end of 1985, I began subscribing to a magazine called “Compute”.  It had actual programs in it in Basic.  I would read the programs to learn how it worked, but at that point, I didn’t own a computer, so all I could do was dream about writing programs.

It wasn’t until Thanksgiving 1987 when I went to visit my ol’ friend Jesse Cheng in Columbia, Missouri who was interning as a medical doctor that I felt a sudden need to have a computer of my own.  He had built a computer using a Heath Kit and we used it to play two computer games.  One was called Starflight:

Starflight by Electronic Arts

Starflight by Electronic Arts

The other was called F15 Strike Eagle:

F-15 Strike Eagle by Microprose

F-15 Strike Eagle by Microprose

When I returned home I was pretty eager to buy a computer.  Up until that time, every time my wife and I had gone to the mall, I always had stopped in the computer stores to look at the latest computers.  I never had really considered buying one.  But now, they had 20 megabyte hard drives!  And you could play these terrific games like Starflight and F-15 Strike Eagle.

So, one day after we had left the mall, and my wife could see the look on my face, she finally said…. “Why don’t you go and buy one?”  I asked her, “Are you sure?  Because you know what is going to happen if I get a computer.  I’ll be playing on it all the time.”  She said, “No.  I want you to go buy one.”  So we turned around and went back to the mall.

That was the start of my journey into the world of computers.

End of Side Story.

As I explained in the post “Boppin’ with Bif during the Power Plant Downsizing“, the company offered an early retirement package for everyone 55 years old and older.  They would give them full benefits to leave.  This meant that our Electrical Supervisor, Leroy Godfrey, as well as the assistant plant manager, Bill Moler and the Plant Manager, Eldon Waugh were all going to retire some time in August 1987.

We had a retirement party for Leroy Godfrey out in the country at Diana Brien’s house.  A bunch of the electricians were there including Mark Meeks, who Leroy knew at the time was the one that was going to be laid off.  Mark commented about that later when he was told that he was losing his job that Leroy had sat there and smiled at him while we were at the party.  Mark knew Leroy didn’t like him, but hadn’t expected to be the one to go since everyone thought it would be Gary Wehunt, since he was the newest member in the shop.

I explained in the post, “The Passing of an Old School Power Plant Man — Leroy Godfrey” what Leroy’s management style was like.  It was very top-down, if you know what I mean.  It was like, “Because I told you so.”  No need to explain anything.  That was the world of Power Plant Management up to that point.

I think Corporate Headquarters realized that this needed to change in order for the company to compete in a world where electric companies could no longer count on the Corporation Commission to guarantee a sustainable electric rate or even a set number of customers.  The world of electric power was changing rapidly and the company needed to move on from the mentality that it could be run like a “good ol’ boys” club.

It is easier to teach young dogs new tricks than older and crankier ones.  It looked to me like this was a logical choice when looking back using hindsight.  I think the company was making a bold move.  I don’t think they really had much of a choice if they wanted to survive.

So, we had the main retirement party at the plant where people stood up and told stories about the old guys that were retiring.  Nothing much happened there except the part where Leroy Godfrey’s daughter stood up and said that we just had to work with him, while she had to live with him… see the post about Leroy above for the full story about that.

Then the following Monday.  I believe it was August 17, 1987, everyone was told to meet in the main break room for a meeting with our new management.  That was when we were introduced to our new plant manager, Ron Kilman.

I remember a certain part of the meeting very well.  Ron said something funny.  It didn’t matter exactly what he said.  I don’t even remember what it was.  Probably something self-deprecating.  I leaned over to Charles Foster, who had been my foreman for a while (on that day, it was officially Andy Tubbs).  I said, “I didn’t know Plant Managers could tell jokes!”

Charles looked back at me and I raised my eyebrows and tilted my head while the corners of my mouth went down. — This was one of the signals I had learned while carpooling with Bud Schoonover when I needed to communicate with Dick Dale without saying anything out loud (see the post:  Carpooling with Bud Schoonover“.  This particular expression meant, “Maybe this won’t be such a bad thing.”

Ron Kilman remained the plant manager at the coal-fired power plant in North Central Oklahoma for the next 7 years.  The stories that I will post during this next year will all be at least partially from this time period.  During this time, there were some decisions that Ron made that I applauded, and others that even he would admit he wished he hadn’t made.

All in all, I think that Ron has a good heart and that those times when he did make a rash decision, it was evident that he was falling back to his “management training” and not managing from his heart.  Old School management training left a lot to be desired.

During the 7 years from 1987 to 1994, the power plant saw a lot of changes.  Some I have alluded to already.  Such as the move to computerize everything.  The other was a total change in how management works.  Or at least that was the attempt.

People were willing to step out of their regular day-to-day jobs and try new things that they thought would help the plant.  Many of these things were successful.  Some of them failed, but not so miserably as they would have if the earlier management had been around.  The employees felt as if they had more of a say in how the plant ran instead of feeling like they were just a bunch of tools running around fixing things.

I have a quote from Ron Kilman that said it all one day after a catastrophe had occurred.  It summed up his management style as opposed to his assistant manager, Ben Brandt.  I will relay the exact story later, but for now I’ll just say that when Ben Brandt saw what happened, the first thing that he said was, “Who did this?”  When Ron Kilman saw what had happened, the first thing he said was, “How can we prevent this from happening again?”

Ben’s approach was from the old school of thought.  Blame and punish the culprit.  Later when we were drastically changing the way process improvements took place, my favorite quote from Ben Brandt is, “I am the obstacle!  We aren’t going to change because I say so.”  We all had to agree.  He was definitely the obstacle.

Ron’s approach was one more like a leader.  “Let’s get the job done right.”  Sure, he is human, so the decisions weren’t always perfect, but I think in general, he was leading where other people may have been dragging.

Well…  I will say no more for now…  I look forward to writing stories about this time period during this next year.  I’m sure there are a lot of those at the plant just as eager to see how I portray the different events that took place during this time.

Comments from the original post:

  1. The Conservative Hill Billy December 28, 2013:

    HP 25? The only model older is Fred Flintstone’s bird chiseling into rock tablet!

  2. Monty Hansen March 4, 2014:

    One day, a fellow operator and I brought in our old slide rules, just to show. Not the round one like yours, but straight and mine had a leather case. A young engineer came hurrying through the control room and said, “I need a calculator – QUICK!” so I handed him my leather case & he ran out, about 30 seconds later he came back with a puzzled look on his face & said “No, I don’t need to MEASURE something, I need to CALCULATE something” We all had a hearty laugh!

Comments from the last repost:

  1. Ron Kilman December 31, 2014

    I loved the old Heath Kits. I built a 14 watt amplifier and an AM/FM receiver that I used for years (both were the tube type – pre-transistor). It was always satisfying to invest a few hours, save a few dollars, learn some new skills, and enjoy a product you couldn’t buy at a store.

  2. David Emeron January 2, 2015

    I still have my 25. It still works.

The Heart of a Power Plant

I was considered the one that “got away”.  Power Plant Men don’t normally leave the Power Plant to go work somewhere else unless they are retiring, being laid off, or for some other compelling reason.  I freely walked away of my own accord August 16, 2001.  I left a job where I could have worked until the day I retired to step out into the unknown.  But… that was the way I had arrived on May 14, 1979, 22 years earlier.

Just as I had driven onto the plant grounds those many years ago, unsure what I was going to encounter, I was now leaving the coal-fired Power Plant in North Central Oklahoma to change my career and become an IT programmer for Dell Computers in Round Rock Texas.  When I arrived my first day at the plant, I had no idea what I was stepping into…  The day I left I was in the exact same boat.

The Intake is just to the right of this picture across the canal

The Intake is just to the right of this picture across the canal

So far, I have gone through my life accepting whatever happens as something that happens for a reason.  With that in mind, I have the belief that whatever the future holds, I just need to hang in there and everything will work out for the best, even though it may not seem like it at the time.  Let me tell you about this experience….

I had accepted the job offer from Dell early in January.  My start date had been set for June 4, 2001.  They were giving me $3,000 for moving expenses to move down to Round Rock when I finished college in May.  I was being hired as an undergraduate college hire.  I would be starting at a slightly smaller salary than my base salary as an electrician.

Dell-Logo

I was taking a considerable cut in salary when you consider the overtime that an Power Plant electrician racked up in a year.  I figured I was starting at the bottom of the ladder in my new job, where I was pretty well topped out at the plant with no opportunity to advance in sight.  Maybe in a few years my salary would catch up and surpass what I made as an electrician.

For about 10 weeks, we drove down to the Austin area and look for a house on the weekends.  It became apparent soon after our house hunting began that the cost of houses was somewhat higher than they were in Stillwater Oklahoma.  We finally had a contract on a house in Round Rock, just 10 minutes away from the main Dell campus.

While we were looking for a house in the Round Rock area, we kept hearing on the radio that Dell was laying off thousands of employees.  The Internet bubble had burst and the drop in sales of computers was taking a toll on the company.  Every time I called the recruiter, I would find that they had been laid off and I had been assigned a different recruiter.  This was disheartening to say the least.

Here I was in a perfectly secure job as an electrician at the Power Plant and I was leaving it to go work for a company that was in the middle of laying off employees.  My wife Kelly and I had been saying one Novena after the other that we make the correct decision about what we should do, and we had chosen Dell Computer.  It just seemed like the right place to go.  So, we decided to just go along with it.

We prayed the Infant Of Prague Novena every day that we made the right choice.

The Infant of Prague is a statue of Jesus as a Boy in a Church in Prague in the Czech Republic

The Infant of Prague is a wax statue of Jesus as a Boy in a Church in Prague, Czech Republic

I gave the plant a 3 month notice that I would be leaving in June.  We had timed the purchase of the house in Round Rock for Friday, June 1.  I would start work the following Monday.  Dell was going to send me my moving expenses on May 4th, one month before my job would begin.

On the morning of Thursday, May 3rd, our realtor in Stillwater called and said she had a contract to sell our home in Stillwater and was going to head out to our house for us to sign.  I had stayed home that morning for that reason.  We were expecting her to arrive at 9:00 am.

At 8:30 I received a call from Dell computers that went something like this….. “Kevin, I am calling to inform you that your offer for employment has changed.  Your first day will no longer be June 4, but will be August 20 (2-1/2 months later).  The good news is that you still have a job with Dell, it just doesn’t start until August.”

Since I was expecting the moving expenses the following day on May 4, I asked the recruiter about that.  He said that since my start date was moved to August, I wouldn’t receive the moving expenses until July.  I told him that I was in the middle of buying a house in Round Rock and that I was counting on that money.  He said he would see what he could do about that.

I hung up the phone and looked at Kelly who was standing there watching my face go from a normal tan to a red glow, then an ashen color all in the matter of 20 seconds.  I explained to her that Dell said I still had a job, but it wouldn’t start until August.

The Realtor was going to be arriving in about 20 minutes for us to sign to sell our house.  Everything was in motion.  It took Kelly and I about 5 minutes to discuss our options before we decided that since we had been praying to make the right choice, we were going to go with this new development.

I called Louise Kalicki, our HR supervisor at the plant and told her that Dell had moved my start date from June 4 to August 20, and I wondered if I could stay on the extra two and a half months.  I was surprised that she had an answer for me so quickly, but here is what she said, “We can keep you on until August 17, but after that date, we will no longer have a job for you.”  I thanked her, and hung up the phone.

Our realtor arrived with the contract for us to sign to sell our house with five acres.  When she walked in the kitchen, I told her what had just happened 1/2 hour earlier.  I could see the sick look on her face after she had worked so hard for so many months to find a buyer for our house.  Here I was telling her that Dell was postponing my hire date.

When I came to the part about where we decided to go ahead with our plans and sell the house and move to Round Rock, I could see all the tension that had been building up behind her ever increasing bulging eyes suddenly ease off.  We signed the papers and our house was set to be sold on June 29.  I had to swing a loan for the month where I bought the house in Round Rock and I sold my house in Stillwater (and hoped that the house was actually sold on time).

A few hours later I received a call from the Dell recruiter saying that he had pulled a few strings and I was going to receive my moving expenses the following day.  The following week after that, the recruiter that had helped me had been laid off as well.

When my final day had arrived on August 16 (I was working 4 -10s, and my last work day that week was Thursday), I was given a going away party (see the post “Power Plant Final Presentation“).  The party was over around 1:30 and I was free to leave.

I said my goodbye’s to my friends in the office area and went down to the electric shop to gather up the rest of my things and leave.  Scott Hubbard asked me if he could trade his Multimeter with me since I had a fancy True RMS Multimeter and he was still using an older version.  So, I traded him, and picked up my tool bucket and headed for the parking lot.

Scott Hubbard

Scott Hubbard

As I approached my car, I could see that Diana Brien was out there waiting for me to leave.  She gave me a Chocolate Chip Cookie the size of a pizza and said she wanted to say goodbye to me and tell me that she had enjoyed being my bucket buddy all those years.  I told her I was going to miss her and everyone else in the shop.

My Bucket Buddy Diana Brien

My Bucket Buddy Diana Brien

With that I climbed in my car and drove away.

When I was selling my house outside Stillwater, I thought that the thing I was going to miss the most was the wide open spaces where we lived.  Our house was on a hill in the country overlooking the city of Stillwater.  We had an Atrium in the living room where you could sit and look at the city lights at night and watch thunderstorms as they blasted transformers around the town.

I was moving into a neighborhood where the house next to ours was no more than 15 feet away.  I thought I’m really going to miss this house….  I thought that until the moment I drove out of the parking lot at the Power Plant.

Then it suddenly hit me….  What about my family?  What about all those people I have just left behind?  When am I ever going to see them?  The thought of missing my house never entered my mind from that moment on.  It was replaced by the great pain one feels when they pack up and walk away from their family not knowing if you will ever see them again.

My heart was still back there with the Power Plant Men and Women I left behind.

The seven hour drive from the plant to Round Rock Texas was a blur.  I knew that I had just closed one door and stepped into an entirely new world.  I didn’t even know if I would like being a programmer when it came down to it.  I had always just been a hacker and I knew I had a lot of holes in my knowledge.  I wasn’t sure if I was going to be any good at my job.

To make that long story short, I have never regretted my move to Round Rock Texas.  I have just gone with the flow knowing that whatever happens, it happens for a reason.  After 12 1/2 years working at Dell, I changed jobs again to work for General Motors in their IT department where I am currently working with the Onstar team.

My friends at Dell asked me the past few years… “Are you going to write about us like you do with the Power Plant Men?”  My reply to that question was “I don’t know… Maybe I will.  I haven’t thought about it.”

That was the same thing I told Sonny Karcher the first day I arrived at the Power Plant and he asked me what I wanted to do when I graduated college.  I told him. “I don’t know.  I was thinking about becoming a writer.”  His next question was, “Are you going to write about us?”  I replied, “Maybe I will.  I haven’t thought about it.”

Harmonizing with Dick Dale on Power Plant Christmas Harmonicas

Originally posted December 20, 2013.  Added additional news about Richard at the bottom of the post:

I think it was while we were sitting in the lunch room eating lunch while I was still a janitor when the subject of harmonicas came up.  Dick Dale must have asked me if I played a musical instrument, because that was my usual reply,  “I play the harmonica… and the Jew’s Harp.”  Just about everyone knows what a Harmonica looks like.  I suppose most people in Oklahoma knows what a Jew’s Harp is.  It’s that instrument you put in your mouth and you flip the little lever and it makes a vibrating twanging sound.

A Jew's Harp

A Jew’s Harp

Dick Dale, worked in the warehouse, and we had been friends since my second year as a summer help.  He told me that he always wanted to learn to play the harmonica.  I told him I learned by just playing around on it.  I never took lessons or used a harmonica book or anything.

When I was growing up, my dad knew how to play the harmonica, so we had one laying around the house all the time.  So, one day I as a kid, I picked it up and started playing with it.  It took about five minutes before my older sister ran to my mom and complained about me making a racket.  My mom told me to take it outside.  So, I not only learned the harmonica by playing around with it.  I was usually sitting alone in the woods while I was learning it.  I have found that under these conditions, there is usually some basic part of the skill that is left out.  So, I knew that my harmonica playing was never really up to snuff.

In the spring of 1983, I joined the labor crew, and I no longer ate lunch in the break room.  I kept it in mind that Dick Dale wanted to learn to play the harmonica, so some time during the summer, I purchased a Hohner Marine Band Harmonica for him, and I began creating a song book with the songs that I knew how to play.  I made up my own notation.  The holes in the harmonica were numbered, so I wrote the numbers of the holes I would blow in, and put an arrow above the number pointing up or down to indicate whether I was blowing in the hole, or sucking the air through the hole.

A Hohner Marine Band Harmonica

A Hohner Marine Band Harmonica

During the summer I talked to Dick Dale a few times, and he was having trouble with his family.  He was getting a divorce from his wife of fifteen years.  He was pretty upset about that, because all along he thought he was happily married.  This turned out not to be the case.  In the process, Dick moved from Stillwater, Oklahoma to Ponca City.  I was living in Stillwater at the time.

When winter came around, my friend Tim Flowers, who was a summer help for two summers at the plant, including the summer I was on the labor crew, came to visit me in Stillwater.  I had bought a harmonica for him for Christmas, and I told him I wanted to go visit Dick Dale in Ponca City and take him his Harmonica for Christmas, along with the booklet I had handwritten (as we didn’t have computers back in those days….).

So, I called up Dick to make sure it would be all right if we dropped by for a little while.  He was at home in his new house, and said he would be delighted if we came by.  Dick knew Tim Flowers from the time he had been a summer help.  While Tim and I were carpooling, Dick would be carpooling with Mike Gibbs, and sometimes on the way home, we would play car tag going down the highway.

One day after a Men’s Club dinner at the plant, while we were leaving, I was in the front of the line of cars heading for the main gate.  In those days, there weren’t two separate gates (one for entering, and one for exiting).  So, the one gate had to open almost all the way up before the person exiting could go through the gate.

When I pulled up to the gate, I pulled up on the entrance side, and Dick and Mike pulled up on the exit side.  We had been racing with each other up to the main gate….  Dick was revving up the engine of his pickup truck which could easily outrun my little blue 1982 Honda Civic.  I had to be more cunning to stay in front of Richard (yeah.  I liked to call him Richard).

As the gate opened, I was on the side where I could go through the gate first.  The way it worked was that as soon as I crossed the threshold of the gate, the gate would stop opening.  then, as I went through it, I drove over to the exit side and ran over the closed loop of the gate, so that the gate closed again leaving Richard and Mike waiting behind the closed gate as we made our escape.

Of course, as soon as we were out on the main highway, it didn’t take long for Richard to make up the mile lead I had gained while he had to wait for the gate to close and re-open.  So, the only way I could prevent him from passing me was by weaving over in the passing lane when he attempted to pass me, and then back again, when he returned to the right lane.

Eventually he was able to go around me, but from that day forward, whenever we were travelling home at the end of the day, and we were following each other, we would both meander back and forth across the highway on the way home…. when it was safe of course.  Since we were out in the country, on a seldom traveled rode, that was usually not a problem.  This came to an end when Richard moved to Ponca City.

When Tim Flowers and I arrived at Richard’s house in Ponca City that Christmas holiday, we surprised him when we handed him his very own harmonica with the booklet that I had written.  He invited us inside and we sat for a while as I explained to him  how the booklet worked.  He said he appreciated it, and that he would work on learning how to play his harmonica so that we could play together.

We sat around and made terrible music together for a while.  Then, because I didn’t want to impose on Richard too much, we left to go back to Stillwater.  A couple of weeks later after the holiday, Richard said he had been practicing on the harmonica and he really appreciated the Christmas present.

I didn’t realize it at the time, but two and a half years later, I moved to Ponca City after I was married, and my wife graduated from nursing school.  That was when Dick Dale, Jim Heflin, Bud Schoonover and I began carpooling together (See the post:  Carpooling with Bud Schoonover).  At the time Dick said that he had hoped to get over the tragedy of his marriage by the end of the year.  He had heard that it took a year to get over 5 years.  Since he had been married for 15 years, he figured by the end of 3 years he should be feeling like he was over it.

The only other person at the plant that I can remember that ever heard me playing the harmonica was Arthur Hammond.  He asked me one day in 1986 if I would bring my harmonica to work so that he could hear me play it.  So, I did, and while we were driving down to the Arkansas River to check batteries, I played some “harmonica blues” for him.  It was just stuff I was making up.

I had seen this movie called “Crossroads” with Ralph Macchio.  In the movie Ralph’s character is trying to learn how to play the Blues guitar from an old and once famous blues musician.  There are two things you learn as the movie unfolds.  The first is that in order to really know how to play the blues, you had to have experienced a real “Blue” time in your life.  So you had to play with the feeling that you had experienced.  The second thing was that Ralph had to play his guitar against a contract guitar player chosen by the devil in order to save the old man’s soul.

Crossroads (1986)

Crossroads (1986)

So, what was I supposed to do?  I had been blessed most of my life.  I hadn’t really experienced any “real” blues.  As Art was driving the pickup truck down to the river, I tried to dream up the bluest thoughts I could.  I thought…. what if the world ran out of chocolate…..  That would ruin everybody’s mood.  I piped out a few sorrowful sounding notes on the harmonica to try and portray my disappointment living without chocolate….. that sounded kind of lame.

Then I thought, wasn’t I upset that one time when I was a summer help and I stayed over to help feed the foremen that were having a dinner in the break room and Pat Braden and I fed the foremen, and no one offered me any food, so I had to go hungry for a couple of hours before I could go home and eat some leftovers at home.  I think I felt kind of blue that day…..  so I cupped my hand over the harmonica, tilted my head to the side and tried to remember that painful time as I shook my hand up and down so that the harmonica would make the sad “whaaa whaa” sound.

I drummed up a few more sad thoughts, and I thought I was really floundering as my debut as a blues harmonica player, so I paused for a few minutes to try and make myself feel bad about doing such a poor job playing the harmonica hoping that it would help.  Then Art said, “Hey.  You are pretty good!”  “What?”  I thought, “Oh… That’s Art, trying to be polite.”  “Thank you,” I said.  Boy.  How pitiful is that?  Surely I should feel bad enough now to play some blues at least a little better….

Anyway, a mile or two later, I decided to give it up.  I put the harmonica back in my pocket and told Art that was all I could do for now.  Finally.  We had some peace and quiet the rest of the way to the river.  I remembered that my sister would always run screaming to my mom when I was younger and blew a few notes on the harmonica, and here Art patiently listened and even complimented my playing.  Gee.  What a true friend he was.

Later, Dick Dale remarried, and as far as I could tell, he was a much happier person a few years after that.  I did what I could to help him.  Though, I think at times I confused him a little.  I will relay a story about that in a few weeks.

My Dear Friend Richard Dale

My Dear Friend Richard Dale

Richard Dale died at the age of 64 on Christmas Day, 2008.  He can now be heard in concert in Heaven playing the mouth organ.  Since I don’t play the regular harp, I hope one day to stand alongside him playing the Jew’s Harp.  Richard’s Mother Maurine Dale joined him in Heaven last month (November, 2015) at the age of 98.

Boppin’ With Bif during the Power Plant Downsizing

About a year after I had joined the electric shop at the Coal-fired Power Plant in North Central Oklahoma, when it was my week to be the truck driver in Fall of 1984, I had an conversation with a contract electrician that I have never forgotten. It was with a guy named Mark Meeks. I have talked about him before in the post entitled, “Life Cycle of a Power Plant Lump of Coal“.

At the time, Mark was working as a contract help for the electric shop. He had been hired to help Mike Rose and Bill Ennis to work on Freeze Protection. I was driving him to the coalyard. He was telling me how he liked working on a job for a while and then he would move on to do another job working somewhere else.

I replied back that I liked having a job where no one had ever been laid off. The electric company had been in existence for about 70 years and had never had a downsizing. I noticed that when I said that, Mark paused and thought about what I said. I was not surprised when a few weeks later, Mark was hired as a plant electrician in the shop.

I’m not saying that no one was ever fired from a power plant. I’m just saying that there wasn’t a general downsizing where a group of people were laid off. After all. you can’t really ship the jobs overseas. Not when you want to provide electricity to Oklahoma City. So, as long as you did your job and showed up to work on time, you had job until it was time to retire. That type of job security sure felt good.

All good things have to come to an end at some point. Toward the end of 1986, Martin Louthan, the Superintendent over all the Power Plants, came to our plant to talk to us. He told us that when our plant was created, it was engineered so that it would accommodate 6 units. At the time we had two. He said that when they staffed the plant, they hired enough people to operate and maintain four units.

He explained that when the oil boom went bust in 1982, it changed everything. The demand for electricity dropped instead of increased as the company had projected. So, our power plant had too many employees for the foreseeable future. We were going to have to downsize. At the time we had over 350 employees.

I think we all knew that we had too many employees at the time. There was a lot of downtime when the maintenance crews had to look for something to do. There are innumerable “for instances” I could bring up. Like times when a team of welders had to go weld something at the train gate, which would normally take a couple of hours. Instead of having it done by lunch time, the crew would park their truck at the train gate, way out where no one would bother them, and listen to the radio for a week.

There were a lot of times like these where there just wasn’t enough work during a regular work week to keep everyone busy. Everyone seemed to have their own special place where they could go take a nap if they needed one. I think we all figured that they kept us all around because when it came time for overhaul, everyone was hard at work making all kinds of overtime. Anyway. We knew it was true. There were too many employees at our plant. Especially since we weren’t going to be expanding anytime soon.

So, here is how the company decided to downsize the company. They offered everyone a “Voluntary Separation Package.” (Or VSP as we refer to it at Dell where I work today – or I did when I originally wrote this post… Now I work at General Motors). They would give you so many weeks of pay for every year of service you had with the company. I don’t remember the exact amount. The employees had until a certain date to decide.

Employees that were over 55 years old would be able to take an early retirement package that would amount to a normal retirement if they had stayed until they had reached retirement age. Our retirement pension plan had grown large enough that it could comfortably absorb those who would early retire. You had until a certain date when you had to decide whether or not you would take the early retirement.

There was one caveat to the taking the Voluntary Separation Package or the early retirement. You had to decide to take one of these options before you were told if your permanent position with the company was going to be terminated at the end of the year. That is, if by the end of June, if you didn’t take the package, then in July if you were told that your position was being eliminated, then the package and retirement was no longer an option. So, if you doubted your “good standing” with the company, you probably would be inclined on taking the retirement package if you were old enough.

In the electric shop I think we had one person old enough to retire. Bill Ennis. He decided to stick it out and hope that his position would still be around. Bill was a good worker, so if that had anything to do with it, he was in good shape. Only one person in our shop decided to take the Voluntary Separation Package.

It broke my heart the day that Arthur Hammond told me he was going to take the package. He only had three years with the company, so his package wasn’t going to be that big, but there was a lump sum associated with it as well. I explained his decision in the post “Power Plant Arguments with Arthur Hammond“. Arthur was a dear friend of mine. I feared that he hadn’t thought this decision through. On one hand, he was used to moving from job to job like Mark Meeks as a Contract electrician. On the other hand, he was raising a family who would benefit from a stable income without having to move from place to place.

The one an only good thing about Arthur Hammond leaving was that Scott Hubbard moved to the electric shop in his place. This was fortunate for Scott because the testing team was not surviving the downsizing and his position was surely going away. I had a bias toward the testers from their inception because when I was on the labor crew, we had not been allowed to apply for the testing jobs. I was also biased because Scott was replacing my friend Arthur. I explained this in the post: “Take a Note Jan, Said the Supervisor of Power Production“. As it turned out, Scott and I became like brothers. We worked together for years, and carpooled most of the time after he joined the shop.

As a side note. I ‘fessed up to Scott one day while we were driving home from work…. He was driving, and I told Scott, “I just want you to know that when you first came to the electric shop. I didn’t like you. It wasn’t anything you did. I just didn’t like you because you were on the testing team.” When I told Scott that, I could tell that he was uncomfortable and that he felt hurt by what I was saying. He turned his head away from me. I went on…. “When I came to know you while we have worked together, I just want you to know that you have become one of my best friends. I am sorry that I had prejudged you. I just wanted to let you know. I’m glad we are on the same team.”

So, what does this have to do with Bif? Well, Lynn “Bif” Johnson and Mark Meeks were two of the few people left that were told on the “day of reckoning” that their jobs were going way.

No. Not this Biff! This is Biff from "Back to the Future" played by Thomas F. Wilson

No. Not this Biff! This is Biff from “Back to the Future” played by Thomas F. Wilson — Ok. I needed at least one picture in this post…

I remember how our entire team was called up to the front office. We waited in Leroy Godfrey’s office. (He was early retiring). They called us one at a time to Bill Moler’s office (He was early retiring also). There we were told that who we would be working for.

Gary Wehunt had been sure that he was going to be axed. I think by that time we knew that the electric shop needed to downsize one more person. Gary was shocked when he was told he still had his job. He was going to be working for Andy Tubbs on the same team I was on. — Of course, in my own cocky 26 year old way, I never thought I would be let go.

Mark Meeks was told he would no longer be employed at the end of the year. The same was true for Bif Johnson. The company offered to help find a job somewhere in the company if there was position left vacant that needed a person with your skills. They also provided a service to help you create a resume and would help you find a job so that by the end of the year, you wouldn’t just be sent packing.

Mark called up some of his contract buddies and was soon on his way to another job. He had been a contract electrician for so long, this was “Situation Normal” (which is the first two words for the acronym “SNAFU”) for him. I thought it was ironic that he should be the one person from the electric shop that was laid off when I knew that the reason he had applied for the position in the first place was most likely because he thought he could be there until he retired, as we had discussed that day in the truck a couple of years earlier.

I later learned that before Leroy Godfrey early retired he had singled out Mark Meeks and had seen to it that he was the person that was going to be laid off because he had said something to Leroy one day that had annoyed him. Much like the comment I had made to Leroy one day when he went to Bill Bennett and told him to fire me. See the Post: “Chief Among the Power Plant Machinists ” As Bill Bennett explained. Leroy wanted to make sure that Mark was included in the downsizing. It was his gift to him.

Leroy Godfrey

Leroy Godfrey

So, what about Bif? With all the help offered by the company to find a new position and five months to find a new job, what happened to Bif? Well. Bif had the attitude that I had, though he is 10 years older than me. He had it in his mind that for some reason the plant couldn’t do without him…. or maybe it was more like the attitude I have at my current job. “I am going to stay here until you make me leave.” The last day of the year came around…. Bif was no longer working for the electric company.

It seems like there were two people at the plant at the end of the year that had their positions eliminated that decided to remain at the plant up until the last day of the year (Off hand, I have forgotten who the other person was). Neither of them had sought help from the company to find another position in the company or even outside the company. They were really only laid off because they chose to be. The company had offered them every opportunity.

There were a few lessons I learned from the different events that happened during this time. The first was that I shouldn’t dislike someone because of someone else’s decision. It wasn’t Scott Hubbard’s decision not to let labor crew hands apply for the testing positions. I saw the same thing happen at the gas plant in Harrah, Oklahoma when Mel Woodring became the foreman ahead of obviously more qualified electricians. The general feeling was to dislike Mel, but who was it that picked him? Mel didn’t have anything to do with that decision. He was a pawn in an effort to move him out of the Muskogee Plant.

The second was that no matter how much you think you are indispensable, you aren’t. We all knew the saying that if you want to find out how important you are, just put your hand into a bucket of water and pull it out and see what kind of hole you leave. That’s how important you are. — Well…. Archimedes would disagree with this assessment given that the water level in the bucket changed, but that wasn’t the point.

Third, Job Security? What’s that? A Power plant probably still has more job security than most other jobs.

The fourth lesson I learned was that when your friend has decided to make a dumb decision, no matter how much it is going to hurt them in the long run, after you have tried to convince them not to take that route, you have to stand by them as much as possible. I have had some friends in the past make really stupid decisions in their lives. No matter how dumb it is…. remain their friend. How much of a friend are you if you cut and run because of their bad decisions? Like my friend Bob Ray reminds me often…. “You can’t fix stupid.” No. You can’t. But you can be there to help when needed.

Comments from Previous post:

    1. heila2013 December 19, 2013:

      “You can be there to help when needed” Great message, for Christmas and the whole year around. Wish you happy holidays. Heila

      Jack Curtis January 9, 2013:

      Delightful! A cameo of the mindset of the sorts of Americans who built industry and of maturing in industrial America as well. And a fair guage against the way we have changed since…