Tag Archives: Six Sigma

A Chance for Power Plant Men to Show Their Quality

Originally posted June 21, 2014.  I updated dates and added some new things.

I don’t know if anyone of us knew what to expect  Wednesday morning January 13 , 1993 when we were told to go to a meeting in the break room that was going to take all day.  We were supposed to be in some kind of training.  Everyone at the plant was going to have to go through whatever training we were having.  Training like this always seemed funny to me for some reason.  I think it was because the hodgepodge of welders, mechanics, machinists, electricians and Instrument and Controls guys seemed so out of place in their coal-stained worn out old jeans and tee shirts.

I remember walking into the break room and sitting down across the table from Paul Mullon.  He was a new chemist at the time.  He had just started work that day.  We became friends right away.  Scott Hubbard, Paul and I were carpooling buddies.  He always looked a lot younger than he really was:

Paul Mullon when he was 90 years old

My favorite picture of Paul Mullon when he was 90 years old

See how much younger he looks?  — Oh.  That’s what I would always say about Gene Day because he was always as old as dirt.  Even when he was young.  Paul is only four years older than I am, but he still looks like he’s a lot younger than 70.  Even his great great grand daughter is saluting him in this photo.  Actually.  I love Paul Mullon as if he was my own brother.  He still looks younger than my younger brother who is four years younger than I am.  People used to think that he was his own daughter’s boyfriend.

When our training began, the plant manager at the coal-fired power plant in North Central Oklahoma, Ron Kilman came in and told us that we were going to learn about the “Quality Process”.  He explained that the Quality Process was a “Process”, not a “Program” like the “We’ve Got The Power Program” we had a few years earlier.  This meant that it wasn’t a one time thing that would be over any time soon.  The Quality Process was something that we will be able to use the rest of our lives.

At this point they handed out a blue binder to each of us.  The title on the front said, “QuickStart – Foundations of Team Development”.  A person from a company called “The Praxis Group”, Rick Olson from Utah (when I originally posted this last year, I couldn’t remember his name.  Then I found my Quality book and it had Rick’s name in it).  I had looked Rick Olson up to see if he was a member of CompuServe and there was Rick Olson from Ogden, Utah.  When I asked him if he was from Ogden, he told me he was from Provo, Utah.

One of the first things Rick asked us to do was to break up into teams of four or five and we were asked to come up with 3 facts about ourselves.  Two of which were true and one that was false.  Then our team mates were asked to vote on which fact they thought was the false one.  The only one I remember from that game was that Ben Brandt had dinner with the Bill Clinton on one occasion when he was Governor of Arkansas.  — At least, I think that was what it was…  Maybe that was the fact that was false.

The purpose of this game was to get to know each other….  Well….  We had all been working with each other for the past 15 years, so we all knew each other pretty good by that time.  Except for someone new like Paul.  I think my false fact was that I had hitchhiked from Columbia, Missouri to New Orleans when I was in college.  — That was an easy one.  Everyone knew that I had hitchhiked to Holly Springs National Forest in Mississippi, not New Orleans.

Anyway, after we knew each other better, we learned about the different roles that members of our teams would have.  Our “Quality” teams were going to be our own crews.  Each team was going to have a Leader, a Facilitator, a Recorder, and if needed (though we never really needed one), a Logistics person.  The Logistics person was just someone that found a place where the team could meet.  We always just met in the Electric Shop office.  I wanted to be “Facilitator”.

We learned about the importance of creating Ground Rules for our Quality Meetings.  One of the Ground rules we had was to be courteous to each other.  Another was to “Be willing to change” (I didn’t think this really belonged as a “Ground Rule”.  I thought of it more as a “Nice to have” given the present company).  Another Ground Rule was to “Discuss – Don’t Lecture”.  One that I thought was pretty important was about “Confidentiality”.  We had a ground rule that essentially said, “What happens in a team meeting… Stays in the team meeting.”

I recently found a list of the Quality teams that were formed at our plant.  Here is a list of the more interesting names and which team it was:  Barrier Reliefs (that was our team — Andy Tubbs team).  Rolaids (Ted Holdges team).  Elmore and the Problem Solvers (Stanley Elmore’s team… of course).  Spit and Whittle (Gerald Ferguson’s Team).  Foster’s Mission (Charles Foster’s team).  Sooner Elite (Engineer’s team).  Boiler Pukes (Cleve’s Smith’s Welding crew I believe).  Quality Trek (Alan Kramer’s Team).  Designing Women (Linda Dallas’s Team).  There were many more.

I think all the Power Plant Quality Teams had the same “Mission Statement”.  It was “To Meet or Exceed our Customer’s Expectations”.  I remember that the person that was teaching all this stuff to us was really good at motivating us to be successful.  As we stepped through the “QuickStart” training manual, the Power Plant He-men were beginning to see the benefit of the tools we were learning.  There were those that would have nothing to do with anything called “Quality”, just because… well…. it was a matter of principle to be against things that was not their own idea.

Later they gave us a the main Quality binder that we used for our team meetings:

Our Quality Manual

Our Quality Manual

When we began learning about the different quality tools that we could use to solve problems, I recognized them right away.  I hadn’t learned any “Quality Process” like Six Sigma at that time, but I was about to graduate from Loyola University in New Orleans in a couple of months with a Masters of Religious Education (MRE) where I had focused my courses on Adult Education.  Half of my classes were about Religious topics, and the other half was about how to teach adults.  The same methods  were used that we learned about in this training.

It just happened that I had spent the previous three years learning the same various quality tools that the Power Plant Men were being taught.  We were learning how to identify barriers to helping our customers and breaking them down one step at at time.  We also learned how to prioritize our efforts to break down the barriers by looking at where we had control and who we were trying to serve… such as ourselves or others.  I remember we tried to stay away from things that were “Self Serving.”

We learned how to do something called a “Barrier Walk”.  This was where we would walk around the plant almost as if we were looking at it for the first time to find barriers we hadn’t noticed before.  We also learned how to brainstorm ideas by just saying whatever came to our minds no matter how silly they may sound without anyone putting anyone down for a dumb idea.  Rick called each barrier that your customer encountered a “SPLAT”.  Our goal was to reduce “SPLAT”s.  I think at one point we even discussed having stickers that said “SPLAT” on them that we could put on barriers when we located them.

When we implemented a quality idea, we were taught to do a “Things Gone Right, Things Gone Wrong” exercise so that we could improve future projects.  This had two columns.  On one side you listed all the good things (which was generally fairly long), and on the other, all the things that went wrong (which was a much shorter list).  This was done so that we could consider how to avoid the things that didn’t work well.

We learned how to make proposals and turn them into a team called “The Action Team”.  I was on this team as the Facilitator for the first 6 months.  Sue Schritter started out as our Action Team Leader.  The other Action team members in the beginning were:  Richard Allen, John Brien, Jim Cave, Robert Grover, Phil Harden, Alan Hetherington, Louise Kalicki, Bruce Klein, Johnnie Keys, Kerry Lewallen, Ron Luckey and George Pepple.

The Power Plant Men learned that there were five S’s that would cause a proposal to fail.

One of those was “Secrecy”.  If you are going to propose something that affects others, then you have to include them in the decision making up front or else even if you think it’s a great idea, others may have legitimate reasons for not implementing it, and you would have wasted your time.

The second was “Simplicity”.  It follows along with Secrecy in that if you just threw the idea together without considering all the others that will be affected by the change, then the proposal would be sent back to you for further study.

The third was “Subjectivity”.  This happens when something just sounds like a good idea.  All the facts aren’t considered.  The solutions you may be proposing may not be the best, or may not even really deal with the root of a problem.  You might even be trying to solve a problem that doesn’t really exist, or is such a small problem that it isn’t worth the effort.

The fourth was “Superficiality”.  This happens when the outcomes from the proposal are not carefully considered.  Things like, what are the long term effects.  Or, What is the best and worst case of this proposal…  Those kind of things are not considered.

The last one is “Self-Serving”.  If you are doing this just because it benefits only your own team and no one else, then you aren’t really doing much to help your customers.  Most likely it may even be causing others an inconvenience for your own benefit.

I know this is becoming boring as I list the different things we learned that week in 1993.  Sorry about that.  I will cut it short by not talking about the “Empowerment Tool” that we learned about, or even the importance of Control Charts and go right to the best tool of them all.  One that Power Plant Men all over can relate to.  It is called the “Fishbone Diagram”.

Fishbone Diagram

Fishbone Diagram

There are few things that Power Plant Men like better than Fishing, so when we began to learn about the Fishbone diagram I could see that even some of the most stubborn skeptics couldn’t bring themselves to say something bad about the Fishbone diagram.  Some were even so enthusiastic that they were over-inflating the importance (and size) of their Fishbone diagrams!  — This along with the Cause and Effect chart were very useful tools in finding the root cause of a problem (or “barrier” as we referred to them).

All in all, this was terrific training.  A lot of good things were done as a result to make things more efficient at the plant because of it.  For the next year, the culture at the plant was being molded into a quality oriented team.  This worked well at our particular plant because the Power Plant Men employed there already took great pride in their work.  So, the majority of the crews fell in behind the effort.  I know of only one team at the coal yard where the entire team decided to have nothing to do with it.

When training was done, I told Rick that I thought that his company would really benefit by having a presence on the Internet.  As I mentioned in last week’s post “Turning the Tables on a Power Plant Interloper”  During this time the World Wide Web did not have browsers and modems did not have the bandwidth at this point, so CompuServe was the only service available for accessing the Internet for the regular population.

I asked Rick if he had heard about CompuServe.  He said he had not heard of it.  I told him that I thought the Internet was going to be the place where training would be available for everyone eventually and he would really benefit by starting a “Quality” Forum on CompuServe, because there wasn’t anything like that on the Internet at the time.  I remember the puzzled look he gave me as he was leaving.  I realized he didn’t have a clue what I was talking about.  Few people knew about the Internet in those days….

I have a number of stories about how the Quality Process thrived at the Power Plant over the next year that I will share.  I promise those stories will not be as boring as this one.

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Power Plant Customer Service Team Gone Wild

Originally posted July 4, 2014.  Added some pictures:

I never would have guessed that playing Power Plant Man jokes on Gene Day would have led me to the “Uh Oh!” moment I later encountered when I was told in no uncertain terms that the President of the Electric Company, James G. Harlow Junior was personally upset with something I had done.  I had learned my first year as a summer help at the coal-fired Power Plant in North Central Oklahoma that “One ‘Uh Oh’ wipes out all previous ‘Atta Boys’!”  I could tell by the way the Electric Supervisor, Tom Gibson’s ears were glowing red that this was considered a little more serious than I had first realized.

I have mentioned in previous posts that playing jokes on Gene Day was one of my favorite Power Plant Man Pastimes.    See the post, “Power Plant Humor and Joking With Gene Day“.    Also see, “Psychological Profile of a Power Plant Control Room Operator“.  My lunch breaks were usually consumed with learning more about how to program the Honeywell mainframe computer used by just about all the company processes that actually ran the company from payroll, to billing, to work orders and Inventory.  I figured that as I learned more about the computer system, the more elaborate jokes I would be able to play on Gene.

Already I had learned about the escape codes used by the large IBM printers that were used throughout the company at the time.  This allowed me to create graphic images on the printer as well as large bold letters.

IBM Dot Matrix Network Printer

IBM Dot Matrix Network Printer

Besides the telephone and inter-company mail, printers were the only other way to communicate to non-present Power Plant Men in 1989.  We had not yet been introduced to e-mail.  I was one of the few people in the company that had an e-mail address on the mainframe, and the only other person that I knew that I could write to was Craig Henry, a Corporate Engineer downtown.

 

Craig Henry. Engineer and Gentleman

Craig Henry. Engineer and Gentleman

Much like the first time when I met Gene Day, when I first encountered Craig Henry, I could tell right away that he was a down-to-earth person that would shoot straight.  Craig probably wouldn’t remember this far into the past that I would reach out to him occasionally just to say “Hi” and to pick his brain about how the corporate IT infrastructure was setup.  I figured since he was one of the few people in the company that even knew what an e-mail address was at the time, he most likely had more knowledge about such things than the average person in Corporate Headquarters.

After finding out that Gene Day would go work out at the Rock Gym in Stillwater, Oklahoma after work, and I had played the joke on him with the notes from the private investigator, I used my knowledge of Printer Escape codes to write documents on the mainframe that when printed out would turn on the graphic commands on the printer so that I could print out pictures.  I don’t mean that I would have a saved picture that I would send to a printer like we might do today.  No.  I had to create these pictures one pixel at a time using commands in a UNIX document on the mainframe.  It was all codes that would not make sense to anyone that didn’t know the graphic commands of the IBM printers.

I had been teasing Gene Day about meeting up with a young “coed” from the University at the Gym each day.  I would do this by printing out messages on the Control Room printer by the the Shift Supervisor’s office when I knew that Gene Day was there filling in as the Shift Supervisor.  They were usually notes from someone that called herself “Bunny”.  Usually they were short notes or “love letters” from Bunny just saying something about how she enjoyed her time with Gene at the Gym.

At the bottom I would sign it “Bunny”  then under it, the printer would read the graphic commands and create a small Playboy Bunny symbol under the name.  At the end, the document would send a command that would put the printer back into the text mode.

Of course.  Whenever I walked into the control room shortly after, just to see how the precipitator was doing, Gene Day would confront me about the notes.  With a grin on his face he would say, “This isn’t funny!  What if my wife found one of these notes?”  — Like that was ever going to happen…. unless he was like me, and likes to save everything.

Note to Gene Day from Bunny

Note to Gene Day from Bunny (now she knows)

In order to create the bunny at the bottom I had to create the pixels in small blocks of 9 pixel patterns.  Here is the code I used to create the bunny:

See? I save everything

See? I save everything

In the last couple of weeks I have written about how the Power Plant Men were introduced to the “Quality Process” (otherwise known as “Six Sigma”).  We had created teams with our crews and we met once each week to come up with Quality ideas.  By August, 1993, I had received my official Certificate Certifying that I had completed all the QuickStart training and was on my way to making a difference in the Power Plant World!

My Customer Service Team Certificate. This made me official!

My Customer Service Team Certificate. This made me official!

So, what do these two events have in common and how did this lead the President of the Electric Company to send out a search warrant on a lowly (lowlife is more like it) Plant Electrician in North Central Oklahoma?  Well.  This is what happened…

First you have to remember that in 1993, the Internet was not easily accessible by the general public.  Company e-mail was still not a reality in our company.  We had dumb terminals and large IBM printers.  That was the extent of most employees interaction with a computer.  Each printer had a designation.  It was a five character ID beginning with a “P”.  So, the  printer in the Electric Shop Office might be…. P1234.  I needed to know this number if I wanted to send  something to it.

At the time, the only thing people had to send to each other were requests for things from the mainframe systems that were used to run the company.  So, for instance, if you wanted to request some parts from the warehouse at our plant, we would send over a list of parts to the warehouse printer where Dick Dale and Darlene Mitchell would pick it up and go retrieve the parts.  So, the people that used the terminals and computers with mainframe emulators on them knew the most commonly used printer numbers in the plant.

If you wanted to send something to someone in Oklahoma City, or to the Power Plant in Muskogee, then you would have to call over there and ask the person what their Printer ID is so you can be sure you are sending your request to the appropriate printer.  Without e-mail, and any other form of computerized communication.  This was the only way at the time.

So, after our Customer Service Team was formed, we would meet once each week to brainstorm new ideas that would benefit the company.  Andy Tubbs was our team leader, as he was our foreman.

Andy Tubbs - True Power Plant Electrician

Andy Tubbs – True Power Plant Electrician

The other members of our Customer Service Team were Diana Brien, Scott Hubbard, Sonny Kendrick, Ben Davis and Gary Wehunt.  I haven’t properly introduced my bucket buddy Diana Brien in a post before.  I have recently obtained a photograph that I can share:

My Bucket Buddy Diana Brien

My Bucket Buddy Diana Brien

We were called bucket buddies because we carried tool buckets with us whenever we went to work on something.  They doubled as our stool and tripled as our trash can.

Thursday, July 15, 1993 during our Quality Brainstorming session, while we were pouring out ideas like…. “What if we changed out the street lights at the plant so that they would be different colors…. wouldn’t that help morale?….   and “How about if we wrapped fluorescent Christmas lights around the high voltage electric lines between here and Oklahoma City so that they could light up the night with colorful lights during the Christmas Season?”….. And other ingenious Brainstorming ideas that are bound to pull up an occasional brilliant idea….. well.  One such idea popped up!

I don’t remember which one of our brilliant brainstorming ideas conjured up this idea, but Andy Tubbs suddenly blurted out…. “What if we had the Printer IDs added as a column in the Corporate Directory? —  You see, each quarter we received an updated copy of the Corporate Phone Book.  It included the names and office phone numbers of all the Electric Company employees.  It also included their mail code.  So, if you wanted to send something through inter-company mail to them, you would know where to send it.  Our mail code was PP75.  That was the code for our power plant.

So, what if we added a column where we had the printer ID that each person would use for people to send printed requests, among other things?  This was Brilliant!  We could just make this proposal and send it downtown to Corporate Headquarters where it would be lost in the “mail”.  Or we could do more research to prove that it was a possible proposal that was really do-able.

So, I suggested….  Well… I can print a form out on every printer in the entire company requesting that they include all the names of all the people that use that printer and mail it through inter-company mail back to me at PP75.  — I had recently uncovered a special printer command that allowed me to do this hidden away on the Honeywell mainframe.  So, we took a vote and it was decided that we would pursue this proposal.  I set to work on creating the form that I would send to every printer.  If we could not only send the proposal to the Communications department downtown, but also a list of everyone and their printers, the work would already have been done for them.

I wanted to send a real fancy letter because I had already created a header using the Quality print settings on the printers.  I had created a Company Logo that (I thought) ingeniously used the backspace command to create two words with one word on top of the other in the middle of a sentence….  Our company began as Oklahoma Gas and…..  in the logo, I wanted the word Gas to be on top of the word And as it was in our company logo in smaller letters than the others.  So… after playing around with it for a while, I created the logo and had it saved on the mainframe.

I know. I was rotten to Gene Day. Here is an example of the header with the "GAS AND" in the middle of the name

I know. I was rotten to Gene Day. Here is an example of the header with the “GAS AND” in the middle of the name.  Remember.  This is on an old IBM Dot Matrix printer using the High Quality setting

After attaching the header to the form, I included a message that told the person that discovered the form on the printer to add the names of all people who used the printer below and to send the form to Kevin Breazile at PP75.  As I mentioned.  In order to make the form look pretty, I turned on the Quality Print settings on the printer at the beginning of the document.  Like the story of the Sorcerer’s Apprentice….. I didn’t know a good way to turn off all the settings I changed to revert the printers back to their original settings.

I ran the command to send the document to every printer on the print server and away they went…. A copy printed out on the  printer in the Electric Shop office so I knew it was working.  Copies printed out on the other 12 printers at our plant.  They also printed out on the 500 other printers throughout Oklahoma.  — With the thought that “My work here is done.”  I went back to work repairing plant electric equipment.

The following Monday I had the day off.  When I returned to work on Tuesday, Denise Anson called me from the front office.  She said that I had a large stack of mail.  I thought, “Oh good!”  Results from our request on Thursday have arrived!  I hurried up to the front office.

When I entered the mail cubicle I was surprised to see how big the pile of envelopes were.  The stack of inter-company envelopes was over two feet high.  “Um…. Thanks….”  I said to Denise.  I picked up the stack and headed back to the Electric Shop to sort out the forms.

After opening the first few envelopes.  I suddenly came to an astonishing discovery.  Not only did the form print out on the large mainframe IBM printers used in office areas, it also had printed out on other types of printers….  I opened one envelope and found the form printed out on a “Work Order” printer.  The paper size was different than the standard paper size, and I hadn’t put a page feed at the end of the document, so, it had left the paper in the middle of the page…. “Uh Oh”.

My “Uh Oh” changed to “UH OH!” after opening a few more of the inter-company envelopes.  I found that the form had printed out on Pay Check Printers!  And Billing Printers!  “UH OH!”  quickly changed to “OH NO!”  When I read comments like “Under no circumstances print anything on this Printer Again!!!!” I realized I had really messed things up.  By changing the font size and the quality settings, the billing, payroll and work order printers all had to be manually reset and the jobs that printed out paychecks, customer bills and employee work orders had to be re-run!

After taking all the forms out of their envelopes, the stack of papers was over 4 inches thick, just to give you an idea about how many responses we had.

A couple of hours later, Tom Gibson called me to his office. “Uh Oh.”  (remember… One “uh oh” erases all previous “atta boy”s).  When I entered Tom’s office, I could tell that something was definitely wrong.  Like I mentioned earlier.  Tom’s ears were beet red…. and in case you don’t know what a beet looks like.  Here is one:

The same color of Tom Gibson's ears

The same color of Tom Gibson’s ears

Of course… I knew what this was all about, only I didn’t know yet, how Tom had found out about it….  Tom began by saying…. “Ron Kilman just received a call from James Harlow asking him who is Kevin Breazile and why is he printing something out on my printer?  Ron didn’t like the fact that he wasn’t aware that you had sent something to the President of the Company’s printer.

 

James G. Harlow Jr.

James G. Harlow Jr.

Sorry.  That’s the biggest picture I could find of James Harlow….

Um what could I say?  So, I said this…

“Well.  This was a quality idea that our team had.  We wanted to collect the names of people that used each printer so that we could send in a proposal to have the printer ID added in the Corporate Directory.”

I didn’t mention that Harlow’s Secretary had returned the form with all the people that used his computer as I had requested, because I knew that the President of the Electric Company was not asking because he was upset that I had printed something out on his printer.   No.  He had probably been told that the reason the bills were late being sent to the one million customers that month was because some kook had messed up their printers and the jobs had to be run over again causing the delay.  So, I thought it was best not to go down that route at this time…

So, I stuck with my story, which was the truth…. I had printed out the forms on all the printers as part of a quality idea by our CST. — I also didn’t mention that three years earlier, Tom had asked me to learn everything I could about the company computer, because he believe that the computer was going to be the wave of the future.

Even though Tom believed my explanation, he told me…. “Kevin, Ron never wants this to happen again, therefore, you are never to send anything out of this plant without Ron Kilman’s personal approval.  Is that clear?”

I replied to Tom that this was unreasonable.  I send things to other departments all the time.  I send Substation Inspection forms, and blueprint revisions and all sorts of other forms downtown all the time.  Ron Kilman wouldn’t want to waste his time approving all those things….

Tom thought about it and revised his statement…. “Then, don’t ever send out anything that isn’t part of your normal daily job without Ron’s approval first.”  — Ok.  I thought…. this works, since everything I do is part of my normal daily job…. Even printing out forms on all the printers in the company… since that was part of our normal “Quality Process” Customer Service Team activity….  So, I happily agreed.  And I left Tom’s office happy that I hadn’t joined the ranks of the unemployed.

That was one thing about working at the plant at this time.  As long as your heart was in the right place….  That is, you tried your best to keep the electricity humming through the electric lines…. then the chances of being fired for messing up, even as big of a mess up as this, most often didn’t end up by losing your job.

I sometimes think that this was my biggest mess up of all time… however…. after this episode was over… there was a part two to this story….. Believe it or not…. Someone else in the company was overjoyed about what I had just done.  They had been trying to do something similar for a long time, only to be told that it was impossible. — Doing the Impossible… I was good at that… Part two of this story is a story for another day…

Since this is a repost of this story, I have written part two, which you can read here:  “Printing Impossible Power Plant Fast News Post“.

Power Plant Carpooling Adventures With Grant Harned

Originally Posted on November 17, 2012:

Louise Gates seemed reluctant to approach me to ask if I wanted to make a donation for flowers for Grant Harned’s funeral.  Of course I did.  He was a good friend of mine.  We had many carpooling adventures before he left his job as the plant receptionist to move to Tulsa, Oklahoma where he died a little more than a year later in May 1984 in an automobile accident.

Thomas “Grant” Harned had obtained a degree in business from Oklahoma State University before accepting the job at the coal-fired power plant in North Central Oklahoma.  He told me that he thought that once he had his foot in the door that he would be able to advance up the HR chain until he worked his way into a business department downtown at Corporate Headquarters.  Downtown is synonymous for Oklahoma City.

Like many struggling new Power Plant men such as Ed Shiever, Dale Hull and others, Thomas lived in a modest student rental apartment near campus.  Grant lived on West Miller Avenue just off of Main Street in Stillwater.  Soon after I had become a janitor and the summer helps I had been carpooling with had left, I began carpooling with Grant.

Grant was a tall thin man with sandy hair and a moustache that reminded me a lot of Gary McCain (also known as Stick).  I have a picture of him around here somewhere that I found many years after his death when we were cleaning out the office that Louise Gates (now Kalicki) had obtained upon becoming the supervisor over HR.  It is a picture of him sitting at the receptionist desk.

Gary (Stick) McCain

Gary (Stick) McCain

Louise gave me a picture of myself that had been taken when I was a janitor, and as I filed through the other pictures I found Grant’s photo.   I knew no one else at the plant would want the picture as few knew him or even remembered him by that time.  So I took it as well.  Some day when I find where I have placed those pictures, I will post them. (I found the picture since the original post).

Grant Harned answering the phone at the plant while he worked as the receptionist.

Grant Harned answering the phone at the plant while he worked as the receptionist.

As I mentioned, Grant was just out of the Business College at OSU and he was fired up, ready to make a difference.  He had all sorts of ideas that he shared with me about how the plant and the company business processes could be improved.

He reminds me now of myself years later when I was carpooling with Scott Hubbard and Toby O’Brien and how I would talk about having smart electricity instead of the same dumb electricity we have had for the past 100 years.  Except that Grant’s ideas were about business processes, where my ideas were about electrons moving through a conductor.

For Power Plant Men, carpooling is a way of getting into other Power Plant Men’s minds and understanding them from the inside out.  Each day while driving back and forth from the plant you are basically locked into a confined space with one or more other individuals with nothing but your thoughts, or NPR or in the case of Dale Hull and Ricky Daniels… Beer.

In the case of Grant Harned, he soon became frustrated.  He had graduated from school and wanted to make a difference somehow.  And he wanted it to happen right away.  He would tell his manager Jack Ballard his ideas about how he thought things could change, and each time Jack would shoot it down.

I’m not saying that Grant had great business changing ideas that would change the way Power Plants all over the country operated.  He just wanted to be listened to, and he didn’t understand that there were built-in reasons why we did it the way we did.  The most important was that “We had been doing it this way for 35 years, and we’re not going to change it now.”

For some reason that rubbed Grant the wrong way.  Maybe because he couldn’t help thinking outside the box.  He obviously had trouble understanding the benefit of doing something the same way for 35 years.  I guess he must have missed the class where “because I said so” was a solid business case.  If he had stuck around long enough Ben Brandt would have explained that to him.

Anyway.  It is true that Power Plant business processes before Grant’s time and for a while after, were based on doing things the same way it has always been done.  I suppose that is why electricity for all those years was the same boring thing…. 60 cycles (60 Hz or 50 Hz in Europe) Alternating Current.  Regular Sine wave, perfectly generated.  Each wave identical to each other.  — But I’ll talk about electricity later.  At this time I was still a janitor.

Sine wave shows how the voltage (and current) changes in Alternating Current electricity

Grant finally decided that he was going to look for another job because he realized that he didn’t have a future at the power plant.  He had been trained as a business person and there was little opportunity to display and cultivate his new found skills at a power plant in the middle of the countryside where everyone was content with the way things were.

Before he left, he gave me some cassette tapes that he used to play on the way to and from work.  I kept them for years until I had worn them out listening to them in my car.  Two of the tapes were The Rolling Stones, one of his favorite bands.

I said goodbye to Grant when he left, but I never forgot him.  Each year on All Souls Day (November 2), I remember him and David Hankins.  He, like most of the men I have carpooled with over the years was like a brother to me.  Those that weren’t brothers, were fathers.

It didn’t occur to me until after I first wrote the original post that years later, I too went to Oklahoma State University while I was working at the plant to obtain a degree from the Business College, Spears School of Business.  As with Grant, the Electric Company had no use for someone with my newfound skills, so I moved south to Round Rock, Texas to work for Dell.  I wonder if Grant was looking down giving me a thumbs up as I walked to the podium to get my diploma.

I mentioned that I don’t know where I placed his Power Plant picture, but I do have other pictures (before I recently found it):

High School Picture of Grant Harned

Grant Harned looking more like I remember him

Evidently someone else remembers Grant as I do.  I found these picture of him on a memorial site online.  There is a comment there that says this of Grant:  “Was known in school and by friends as Grant. He had a great sense of humor and would always make you laugh.”

I agreed with Grant.  He really didn’t belong at the power plant.  Power Plant life and culture at the time was not geared toward “continuous improvement” and Six Sigma.  It was about coming home safely at night to your family and doing a good days worth of work and having something to show for it.  He was young and ambitious.

I cherish the time I spent with Grant driving to and from work.  I remember many of the conversations that we had.  Many of them philosophical in nature.  Some having to do with the regular questions people have about life and God.  I know that he was being drawn toward something greater, and in the end I pray that he found it.

A Chance for Power Plant Men to Show Their Quality

Originally posted June 21, 2014.  I updated dates and added some new things.

I don’t know if anyone of us knew what to expect  Wednesday morning January 13 , 1993 when we were told to go to a meeting in the break room that was going to take all day.  We were supposed to be in some kind of training.  Everyone at the plant was going to have to go through whatever training we were having.  Training like this always seemed funny to me for some reason.  I think it was because the hodgepodge of welders, mechanics, machinists, electricians and Instrument and Controls guys seemed so out of place in their coal-stained worn out old jeans and tee shirts.

I remember walking into the break room and sitting down across the table from Paul Mullon.  He was a new chemist at the time.  He had just started work that day.  We became friends right away.  Scott Hubbard, Paul and I were carpooling buddies.  He always looked a lot younger than he really was:

Paul Mullon when he was 90 years old

My favorite picture of Paul Mullon when he was 90 years old

See how much younger he looks?  — Oh.  That’s what I would always say about Gene Day because he was always as old as dirt.  Even when he was young.  Paul is only four years older than I am, but he still looks like he’s a lot younger than 70.  Even his great great grand daughter is saluting him in this photo.  Actually.  I love Paul Mullon as if he was my own brother.  He still looks younger than my younger brother who is four years younger than I am.  People used to think that he was his own daughter’s boyfriend.

When our training began, the plant manager at the coal-fired power plant in North Central Oklahoma, Ron Kilman came in and told us that we were going to learn about the “Quality Process”.  He explained that the Quality Process was a “Process”, not a “Program” like the “We’ve Got The Power Program” we had a few years earlier.  This meant that it wasn’t a one time thing that would be over any time soon.  The Quality Process was something that we will be able to use the rest of our lives.

At this point they handed out a blue binder to each of us.  The title on the front said, “QuickStart – Foundations of Team Development”.  A person from a company called “The Praxis Group”, Rick Olson from Utah (when I originally posted this last year, I couldn’t remember his name.  Then I found my Quality book and it had Rick’s name in it).  I had looked Rick Olson up to see if he was a member of CompuServe and there was Rick Olson from Ogden, Utah.  When I asked him if he was from Ogden, he told me he was from Provo, Utah.

One of the first things Rick asked us to do was to break up into teams of four or five and we were asked to come up with 3 facts about ourselves.  Two of which were true and one that was false.  Then our team mates were asked to vote on which fact they thought was the false one.  The only one I remember from that game was that Ben Brandt had dinner with the Bill Clinton on one occasion when he was Governor of Arkansas.  — At least, I think that was what it was…  Maybe that was the fact that was false.

The purpose of this game was to get to know each other….  Well….  We had all been working with each other for the past 15 years, so we all knew each other pretty good by that time.  Except for someone new like Paul.  I think my false fact was that I had hitchhiked from Columbia, Missouri to New Orleans when I was in college.  — That was an easy one.  Everyone knew that I had hitchhiked to Holly Springs National Forest in Mississippi, not New Orleans.

Anyway, after we knew each other better, we learned about the different roles that members of our teams would have.  Our “Quality” teams were going to be our own crews.  Each team was going to have a Leader, a Facilitator, a Recorder, and if needed (though we never really needed one), a Logistics person.  The Logistics person was just someone that found a place where the team could meet.  We always just met in the Electric Shop office.  I wanted to be “Facilitator”.

We learned about the importance of creating Ground Rules for our Quality Meetings.  One of the Ground rules we had was to be courteous to each other.  Another was to “Be willing to change” (I didn’t think this really belonged as a “Ground Rule”.  I thought of it more as a “Nice to have” given the present company).  Another Ground Rule was to “Discuss – Don’t Lecture”.  One that I thought was pretty important was about “Confidentiality”.  We had a ground rule that essentially said, “What happens in a team meeting… Stays in the team meeting.”

I recently found a list of the Quality teams that were formed at our plant.  Here is a list of the more interesting names and which team it was:  Barrier Reliefs (that was our team — Andy Tubbs team).  Rolaids (Ted Holdges team).  Elmore and the Problem Solvers (Stanley Elmore’s team… of course).  Spit and Whittle (Gerald Ferguson’s Team).  Foster’s Mission (Charles Foster’s team).  Sooner Elite (Engineer’s team).  Boiler Pukes (Cleve’s Smith’s Welding crew I believe).  Quality Trek (Alan Kramer’s Team).  Designing Women (Linda Dallas’s Team).  There were many more.

I think all the Power Plant Quality Teams had the same “Mission Statement”.  It was “To Meet or Exceed our Customer’s Expectations”.  I remember that the person that was teaching all this stuff to us was really good at motivating us to be successful.  As we stepped through the “QuickStart” training manual, the Power Plant He-men were beginning to see the benefit of the tools we were learning.  There were those that would have nothing to do with anything called “Quality”, just because… well…. it was a matter of principle to be against things that was not their own idea.

Later they gave us a the main Quality binder that we used for our team meetings:

Our Quality Manual

Our Quality Manual

When we began learning about the different quality tools that we could use to solve problems, I recognized them right away.  I hadn’t learned any “Quality Process” like Six Sigma at that time, but I was about to graduate from Loyola University in New Orleans in a couple of months with a Masters of Religious Education (MRE) where I had focused my courses on Adult Education.  Half of my classes were about Religious topics, and the other half was about how to teach adults.  The same methods  were used that we learned about in this training.

It just happened that I had spent the previous three years learning the same various quality tools that the Power Plant Men were being taught.  We were learning how to identify barriers to helping our customers and breaking them down one step at at time.  We also learned how to prioritize our efforts to break down the barriers by looking at where we had control and who we were trying to serve… such as ourselves or others.  I remember we tried to stay away from things that were “Self Serving.”

We learned how to do something called a “Barrier Walk”.  This was where we would walk around the plant almost as if we were looking at it for the first time to find barriers we hadn’t noticed before.  We also learned how to brainstorm ideas by just saying whatever came to our minds no matter how silly they may sound without anyone putting anyone down for a dumb idea.  Rick called each barrier that your customer encountered a “SPLAT”.  Our goal was to reduce “SPLAT”s.  I think at one point we even discussed having stickers that said “SPLAT” on them that we could put on barriers when we located them.

When we implemented a quality idea, we were taught to do a “Things Gone Right, Things Gone Wrong” exercise so that we could improve future projects.  This had two columns.  On one side you listed all the good things (which was generally fairly long), and on the other, all the things that went wrong (which was a much shorter list).  This was done so that we could consider how to avoid the things that didn’t work well.

We learned how to make proposals and turn them into a team called “The Action Team”.  I was on this team as the Facilitator for the first 6 months.  Sue Schritter started out as our Action Team Leader.  The other Action team members in the beginning were:  Richard Allen, John Brien, Jim Cave, Robert Grover, Phil Harden, Alan Hetherington, Louise Kalicki, Bruce Klein, Johnnie Keys, Kerry Lewallen, Ron Luckey and George Pepple.

The Power Plant Men learned that there were five S’s that would cause a proposal to fail.

One of those was “Secrecy”.  If you are going to propose something that affects others, then you have to include them in the decision making up front or else even if you think it’s a great idea, others may have legitimate reasons for not implementing it, and you would have wasted your time.

The second was “Simplicity”.  It follows along with Secrecy in that if you just threw the idea together without considering all the others that will be affected by the change, then the proposal would be sent back to you for further study.

The third was “Subjectivity”.  This happens when something just sounds like a good idea.  All the facts aren’t considered.  The solutions you may be proposing may not be the best, or may not even really deal with the root of a problem.  You might even be trying to solve a problem that doesn’t really exist, or is such a small problem that it isn’t worth the effort.

The fourth was “Superficiality”.  This happens when the outcomes from the proposal are not carefully considered.  Things like, what are the long term effects.  Or, What is the best and worst case of this proposal…  Those kind of things are not considered.

The last one is “Self-Serving”.  If you are doing this just because it benefits only your own team and no one else, then you aren’t really doing much to help your customers.  Most likely it may even be causing others an inconvenience for your own benefit.

I know this is becoming boring as I list the different things we learned that week in 1993.  Sorry about that.  I will cut it short by not talking about the “Empowerment Tool” that we learned about, or even the importance of Control Charts and go right to the best tool of them all.  One that Power Plant Men all over can relate to.  It is called the “Fishbone Diagram”.

Fishbone Diagram

Fishbone Diagram

There are few things that Power Plant Men like better than Fishing, so when we began to learn about the Fishbone diagram I could see that even some of the most stubborn skeptics couldn’t bring themselves to say something bad about the Fishbone diagram.  Some were even so enthusiastic that they were over-inflating the importance (and size) of their Fishbone diagrams!  — This along with the Cause and Effect chart were very useful tools in finding the root cause of a problem (or “barrier” as we referred to them).

All in all, this was terrific training.  A lot of good things were done as a result to make things more efficient at the plant because of it.  For the next year, the culture at the plant was being molded into a quality oriented team.  This worked well at our particular plant because the Power Plant Men employed there already took great pride in their work.  So, the majority of the crews fell in behind the effort.  I know of only one team at the coal yard where the entire team decided to have nothing to do with it.

When training was done, I told Rick that I thought that his company would really benefit by having a presence on the Internet.  As I mentioned in last week’s post “Turning the Tables on a Power Plant Interloper”  During this time the World Wide Web did not have browsers and modems did not have the bandwidth at this point, so CompuServe was the only service available for accessing the Internet for the regular population.

I asked Rick if he had heard about CompuServe.  He said he had not heard of it.  I told him that I thought the Internet was going to be the place where training would be available for everyone eventually and he would really benefit by starting a “Quality” Forum on CompuServe, because there wasn’t anything like that on the Internet at the time.  I remember the puzzled look he gave me as he was leaving.  I realized he didn’t have a clue what I was talking about.  Few people knew about the Internet in those days….

I have a number of stories about how the Quality Process thrived at the Power Plant over the next year that I will share.  I promise those stories will not be as boring as this one.

Power Plant Customer Service Team Gone Wild

Originally posted July 4, 2014.  Added some pictures:

I never would have guessed that playing Power Plant Man jokes on Gene Day would have led me to the “Uh Oh!” moment I later encountered when I was told in no uncertain terms that the President of the Electric Company, James G. Harlow Junior was personally upset with something I had done.  I had learned my first year as a summer help at the coal-fired Power Plant in North Central Oklahoma that “One ‘Uh Oh’ wipes out all previous ‘Atta Boys’!”  I could tell by the way the Electric Supervisor, Tom Gibson’s ears were glowing red that this was considered a little more serious than I had first realized.

I have mentioned in previous posts that playing jokes on Gene Day was one of my favorite Power Plant Man Pastimes.    See the post, “Power Plant Humor and Joking With Gene Day“.    Also see, “Psychological Profile of a Power Plant Control Room Operator“.  My lunch breaks were usually consumed with learning more about how to program the Honeywell mainframe computer used by just about all the company processes that actually ran the company from payroll, to billing, to work orders and Inventory.  I figured that as I learned more about the computer system, the more elaborate jokes I would be able to play on Gene.

Already I had learned about the escape codes used by the large IBM printers that were used throughout the company at the time.  This allowed me to create graphic images on the printer as well as large bold letters.

IBM Dot Matrix Network Printer

IBM Dot Matrix Network Printer

Besides the telephone and inter-company mail, printers were the only other way to communicate to non-present Power Plant Men in 1989.  We had not yet been introduced to e-mail.  I was one of the few people in the company that had an e-mail address on the mainframe, and the only other person that I knew that I could write to was Craig Henry, a Corporate Engineer downtown.

 

Craig Henry.  Engineer and Gentleman

Craig Henry. Engineer and Gentleman

Much like the first time when I met Gene Day, when I first encountered Craig Henry, I could tell right away that he was a down-to-earth person that would shoot straight.  Craig probably wouldn’t remember this far into the future that I would reach out to him occasionally just to say “Hi” and to pick his brain about how the corporate IT infrastructure was setup.  I figured since he was one of the few people in the company that even knew what an e-mail address was at the time, he most likely had more knowledge about such things than the average person in Corporate Headquarters.

After finding out that Gene Day would go work out at the Rock Gym in Stillwater, Oklahoma after work, and I had played the joke on him with the notes from the private investigator, I used my knowledge of Printer Escape codes to write documents on the mainframe that when printed out would turn on the graphic commands on the printer so that I could print out pictures.  I don’t mean that I would have a saved picture that I would send to a printer like we might do today.  No.  I had to create these pictures one pixel at a time using commands in a UNIX document on the mainframe.  It was all codes that would not make sense to anyone that didn’t know the graphic commands of the IBM printers.

I had been teasing Gene Day about meeting up with a young “coed” from the University at the Gym each day.  I would do this by printing out messages on the Control Room printer by the the Shift Supervisor’s office when I knew that Gene Day was there filling in as the Shift Supervisor.  They were usually notes from someone that called herself “Bunny”.  Usually they were short notes or “love letters” from Bunny just saying something about how she enjoyed her time with Gene at the Gym.

At the bottom I would sign it “Bunny”  then under it, the printer would read the graphic commands and create a small Playboy Bunny symbol under the name.  At the end, the document would send a command that would put the printer back into the text mode.

Of course.  Whenever I walked into the control room shortly after, just to see how the precipitator was doing, Gene Day would confront me about the notes.  With a grin on his face he would say, “This isn’t funny!  What if my wife found one of these notes?”  — Like that was ever going to happen…. unless he was like me, and likes to save everything.

Note to Gene Day from Bunny

Note to Gene Day from Bunny (now she knows)

In order to create the bunny at the bottom I had to create the pixels in small blocks of 9 pixel patterns.  Here is the code I used to create the bunny:

See?  I save everything

See? I save everything

In the last couple of weeks I have written about how the Power Plant Men were introduced to the “Quality Process” (otherwise known as “Six Sigma”).  We had created teams with our crews and we met once each week to come up with Quality ideas.  By August, 1993, I had received my official Certificate Certifying that I had completed all the QuickStart training and was on my way to making a difference in the Power Plant World!

My Customer Service Team Certificate.  This made me official!

My Customer Service Team Certificate. This made me official!

So, what do these two events have in common and how did this lead the President of the Electric Company to send out a search warrant on a lowly (lowlife is more like it) Plant Electrician in North Central Oklahoma?  Well.  This is what happened…

First you have to remember that in 1993, the Internet was not easily accessible by the general public.  Company e-mail was still not a reality in our company.  We had dumb terminals and large IBM printers.  That was the extent of most employees interaction with a computer.  Each printer had a designation.  It was a four character ID beginning with a “P”.  So, the  printer in the Electric Shop Office might be…. P123.  I needed to know this number if I wanted to send  something to it.

At the time, the only thing people had to send to each other were requests for things from the mainframe systems that were used to run the company.  So, for instance, if you wanted to request some parts from the warehouse at our plant, we would send over a list of parts to the warehouse printer where Dick Dale and Darlene Mitchell would pick it up and go retrieve the parts.  So, the people that used the terminals and computers with mainframe emulators on them knew the most commonly used printer numbers in the plant.

If you wanted to send something to someone in Oklahoma City, or to the Power Plant in Muskogee, then you would have to call over there and ask the person what their Printer ID is so you can be sure you are sending your request to the appropriate printer.  Without e-mail, and any other form of computerized communication.  This was the only way at the time.

So, after our Customer Service Team was formed, we would meet once each week to brainstorm new ideas that would benefit the company.  Andy Tubbs was our team leader, as he was our foreman.

Andy Tubbs - True Power Plant Electrician

Andy Tubbs – True Power Plant Electrician

The other members of our Customer Service Team were Diana Brien, Scott Hubbard, Sonny Kendrick, Ben Davis and Gary Wehunt.  I haven’t properly introduced my bucket buddy Diana Brien in a post before.  I have recently obtained a photograph that I can share:

My Bucket Buddy Diana Brien

My Bucket Buddy Diana Brien

We were called bucket buddies because we carried tool buckets with us whenever we went to work on something.  They doubled as our stool and tripled as our trash can.

Thursday, July 15, 1993 during our Quality Brainstorming session, while we were pouring out ideas like…. “What if we changed out the street lights at the plant so that they would be different colors…. wouldn’t that help morale?….   and “How about if we wrapped fluorescent Christmas lights around the high voltage electric lines between here and Oklahoma City so that they could light up the night with colorful lights during the Christmas Season?”….. And other ingenious Brainstorming ideas that are bound to pull up an occasional brilliant idea….. well.  One such idea popped up!

I don’t remember which one of our brilliant brainstorming ideas conjured up this idea, but Andy Tubbs suddenly blurted out…. “What if we had the Printer IDs added as a column in the Corporate Directory? —  You see, each quarter we received an updated copy of the Corporate Phone Book.  It included the names and office phone numbers of all the Electric Company employees.  It also included their mail code.  So, if you wanted to send something through inter-company mail to them, you would know where to send it.  Our mail code was PP75.  That was the code for our power plant.

So, what if we added a column where we had the printer ID that each person would use for people to send printed requests, among other things?  This was Brilliant!  We could just make this proposal and send it downtown to Corporate Headquarters where it would be lost in the “mail”.  Or we could do more research to prove that it was a possible proposal that was really do-able.

So, I suggested….  Well… I can print a form out on every printer in the entire company requesting that they include all the names of all the people that use that printer and mail it through inter-company mail back to me at PP75.  — I had recently uncovered a special printer command that allowed me to do this hidden away on the Honeywell mainframe.  So, we took a vote and it was decided that we would pursue this proposal.  I set to work on creating the form that I would send to every printer.  If we could not only send the proposal to the Communications department downtown, but also a list of everyone and their printers, the work would already have been done for them.

I wanted to send a real fancy letter because I had already created a header using the Quality print settings on the printers.  I had created a Company Logo that (I thought) ingeniously used the backspace command to create two words with one word on top of the other in the middle of a sentence….  Our company began as Oklahoma Gas and…..  in the logo, I wanted the word Gas to be on top of the word And as it was in our company logo in smaller letters than the others.  So… after playing around with it for a while, I created the logo and had it saved on the mainframe.

I know.  I was rotten to Gene Day.  Here is an example of the header with the "GAS AND" in the middle of the name

I know. I was rotten to Gene Day. Here is an example of the header with the “GAS AND” in the middle of the name.  Remember.  This is on an old IBM Dot Matrix printer using the High Quality setting

After attaching the header to the form, I included a message that told the person that discovered the form on the printer to add the names of all people who used the printer below and to send the form to Kevin Breazile at PP75.  As I mentioned.  In order to make the form look pretty, I turned on the Quality Print settings on the printer at the beginning of the document.  Like the story of the Sorcerer’s Apprentice….. I didn’t know a good way to turn off all the settings I changed to revert the printers back to their original settings.

I ran the command to send the document to every printer on the print server and away they went…. A copy printed out on the  printer in the Electric Shop office so I knew it was working.  Copies printed out on the other 12 printers at our plant.  They also printed out on the 500 other printers throughout Oklahoma.  — With the thought that “My work here is done.”  I went back to work repairing plant electric equipment.

The following Monday I had the day off.  When I returned to work on Tuesday, Denise Anson called me from the front office.  She said that I had a large stack of mail.  I thought, “Oh good!”  Results from our request on Thursday have arrived!  I hurried up to the front office.

When I entered the mail cubicle I was surprised to see how big the pile of envelopes were.  The stack of inter-company envelopes was over two feet high.  “Um…. Thanks….”  I said to Denise.  I picked up the stack and headed back to the Electric Shop to sort out the forms.

After opening the first few envelopes.  I suddenly came to an astonishing discovery.  Not only did the form print out on the large mainframe IBM printers used in office areas, it also had printed out on other types of printers….  I opened one envelope and found the form printed out on a “Work Order” printer.  The paper size was different than the standard paper size, and I hadn’t put a page feed at the end of the document, so, it had left the paper in the middle of the page…. “Uh Oh”.

My “Uh Oh” changed to “UH OH!” after opening a few more of the inter-company envelopes.  I found that the form had printed out on Pay Check Printers!  And Billing Printers!  “UH OH!”  quickly changed to “OH NO!”  When I read comments like “Under no circumstances print anything on this Printer Again!!!!” I realized I had really messed things up.  By changing the font size and the quality settings, the billing, payroll and work order printers all had to be manually reset and the jobs that printed out paychecks, customer bills and employee work orders had to be re-run!

After taking all the forms out of their envelopes, the stack of papers was over 4 inches thick, just to give you an idea about how many responses we had.

A couple of hours later, Tom Gibson called me to his office. “Uh Oh.”  (remember… One “uh oh” erases all previous “atta boy”s).  When I entered Tom’s office, I could tell that something was definitely wrong.  Like I mentioned earlier.  Tom’s ears were beet red…. and in case you don’t know what a beet looks like.  Here is one:

The same color of Tom Gibson's ears

The same color of Tom Gibson’s ears

Of course… I knew what this was all about, only I didn’t know yet, how Tom had found out about it….  Tom began by saying…. “Ron Kilman just received a call from James Harlow asking him who is Kevin Breazile and why is he printing something out on my printer?  Ron didn’t like the fact that he wasn’t aware that you had sent something to the President of the Company’s printer.

 

James G. Harlow Jr.

James G. Harlow Jr.

Sorry.  That’s the biggest picture I could find of James Harlow….

Um what could I say?  So, I said this…

“Well.  This was a quality idea that our team had.  We wanted to collect the names of people that used each printer so that we could send in a proposal to have the printer ID added in the Corporate Directory.”

I didn’t mention that Harlow’s Secretary had returned the form with all the people that used his computer as I had requested, because I knew that the President of the Electric Company was not asking because he was upset that I had printed something out on his printer.   No.  He had probably been told that the reason the bills were late being sent to the one million customers that month was because some kook had messed up their printers and the jobs had to be run over again causing the delay.  So, I thought it was best not to go down that route at this time…

So, I stuck with my story, which was the truth…. I had printed out the forms on all the printers as part of a quality idea by our CST. — I also didn’t mention that three years earlier, Tom had asked me to learn everything I could about the company computer, because he believe that the computer was going to be the wave of the future.

Even though Tom believed my explanation, he told me…. “Kevin, Ron never wants this to happen again, therefore, you are never to send anything out of this plant without Ron Kilman’s personal approval.  Is that clear?”

I replied to Tom that this was unreasonable.  I send things to other departments all the time.  I send Substation Inspection forms, and blueprint revisions and all sorts of other forms downtown all the time.  Ron Kilman wouldn’t want to waste his time approving all those things….

Tom thought about it and revised his statement…. “Then, don’t ever send out anything that isn’t part of your normal daily job without Ron’s approval first.”  — Ok.  I thought…. this works, since everything I do is part of my normal daily job…. Even printing out forms on all the printers in the company… since that was part of our normal “Quality Process” Customer Service Team activity….  So, I happily agreed.  And I left Tom’s office happy that I hadn’t joined the ranks of the unemployed.

That was one thing about working at the plant at this time.  As long as your heart was in the right place….  That is, you tried your best to keep the electricity humming through the electric lines…. then the chances of being fired for messing up, even as big of a mess up as this, most often didn’t end up by losing your job.

I sometimes think that this was my biggest mess up of all time… however…. after this episode was over… there was a part two to this story….. Believe it or not…. Someone else in the company was overjoyed about what I had just done.  They had been trying to do something similar for a long time, only to be told that it was impossible. — Doing the Impossible… I was good at that… Part two of this story is a story for another day…

Since this is a repost of this story, I have written part two, which you can read here:  “Printing Impossible Power Plant Fast News Post“.

Power Plant Carpooling Adventures With Grant Harned

Originally Posted on November 17, 2012:

Louise Gates seemed reluctant to approach me to ask if I wanted to make a donation for flowers for Grant Harned’s funeral.  Of course I did.  He was a good friend of mine.  We had many carpooling adventures before he left his job as the plant receptionist to move to Tulsa, Oklahoma where he died a little more than a year later in May 1984 in an automobile accident.

Thomas “Grant” Harned had obtained a degree in business from Oklahoma State University before accepting the job at the coal-fired power plant in North Central Oklahoma.  He told me that he thought that once he had his foot in the door that he would be able to advance up the HR chain until he worked his way into a business department downtown at Corporate Headquarters.  Downtown is synonymous for Oklahoma City.

Like many struggling new Power Plant men such as Ed Shiever, Dale Hull and others, Thomas lived in a modest student rental apartment near campus.  Grant lived on West Miller Avenue just off of Main Street in Stillwater.  Soon after I had become a janitor and the summer helps I had been carpooling with had left, I began carpooling with Grant.

Grant was a tall thin man with sandy hair and a moustache that reminded me a lot of Gary McCain (also known as Stick).  I have a picture of him around here somewhere that I found many years after his death when we were cleaning out the office that Louise Gates (now Kalicki) had obtained upon becoming the supervisor over HR.  It is a picture of him sitting at the receptionist desk.

Gary (Stick) McCain

Gary (Stick) McCain

Louise gave me a picture of myself that had been taken when I was a janitor, and as I filed through the other pictures I found Grant’s photo.   I knew no one else at the plant would want the picture as few knew him or even remembered him by that time.  So I took it as well.  Some day when I find where I have placed those pictures, I will post them. (I found the picture since I the original post).

Grant Harned answering the phone at the plant while he worked as the receptionist.

Grant Harned answering the phone at the plant while he worked as the receptionist.

As I mentioned, Grant was just out of the Business College at OSU and he was fired up, ready to make a difference.  He had all sorts of ideas that he shared with me about how the plant and the company business processes could be improved.

He reminds me now of myself years later when I was carpooling with Scott Hubbard and Toby O’Brien and how I would talk about having smart electricity instead of the same dumb electricity we have had for the past 100 years.  Except that Grant’s ideas were about business processes, where my ideas were about electrons moving through a conductor.

For Power Plant Men, carpooling is a way of getting into other Power Plant Men’s minds and understanding them from the inside out.  Each day while driving back and forth from the plant you are basically locked into a confined space with one or more other individuals with nothing but your thoughts, or NPR or in the case of Dale Hull and Ricky Daniels… Beer.

In the case of Grant Harned, he soon became frustrated.  He had graduated from school and wanted to make a difference somehow.  And he wanted it to happen right away.  He would tell his manager Jack Ballard his ideas about how he thought things could change, and each time Jack would shoot it down.

I’m not saying that Grant had great business changing ideas that would change the way Power Plants all over the country operated.  He just wanted to be listened to, and he didn’t understand that there were built-in reasons why we did it the way we did.  The most important was that “We had been doing it this way for 35 years, and we’re not going to change it now.”

For some reason that rubbed Grant the wrong way.  Maybe because he couldn’t help thinking outside the box.  He obviously had trouble understanding the benefit of doing something the same way for 35 years.  I guess he must have missed the class where “because I said so” was a solid business case.  If he had stuck around long enough Ben Brandt would have explained that to him.

Anyway.  It is true that Power Plant business processes before Grant’s time and for a while after, were based on doing things the same way it has always been done.  I suppose that is why electricity for all those years was the same boring thing…. 60 cycles (60 Hz or 50 Hz in Europe) Alternating Current.  Regular Sine wave, perfectly generated.  Each wave identical to each other.  — But I’ll talk about electricity later.  At this time I was still a janitor.

Sine wave shows how the voltage (and current) changes in Alternating Current electricity

Grant finally decided that he was going to look for another job because he realized that he didn’t have a future at the power plant.  He had been trained as a business person and there was little opportunity to display and cultivate his new found skills at a power plant in the middle of the countryside where everyone was content with the way things were.

Before he left, he gave me some cassette tapes that he used to play on the way to and from work.  I kept them for years until I had worn them out listening to them in my car.  Two of the tapes were The Rolling Stones, one of his favorite bands.

I said goodbye to Grant when he left, but I never forgot him.  Each year on All Souls Day (November 2), I remember him and David Hankins.  He, like most of the men I have carpooled with over the years was like a brother to me.  Those that weren’t brothers, were fathers.

It didn’t occur to me until after I first wrote the original post that years later, I too went to Oklahoma State University while I was working at the plant to obtain a degree from the Business College, Spears School of Business.  I wonder if Grant was looking down giving me a thumbs up as I walked to the podium to get my diploma.

I mentioned that I don’t know where I placed his Power Plant picture, but I do have other pictures (before I recently found it):

High School Picture of Grant Harned

Grant Harned looking more like I remember him

Evidently someone else remembers Grant as I do.  I found these picture of him on a memorial site online.  There is a comment there that says this of Grant:  “Was known in school and by friends as Grant. He had a great sense of humor and would always make you laugh.”

I agreed with Grant.  He really didn’t belong at the power plant.  Power Plant life and culture at the time was not geared toward “continuous improvement” and Six Sigma.  It was about coming home safely at night to your family and doing a good days worth of work and having something to show for it.  He was young and ambitious.

I cherish the time I spent with Grant driving to and from work.  I remember many of the conversations that we had.  Many of them philosophical in nature.  Some having to do with the regular questions people have about life and God.  I know that he was being drawn toward something greater, and in the end I pray that he found it.

Power Plant Customer Service Team Gone Wild

Originally posted July 4, 2014.  Added some pictures:

I never would have guessed that playing Power Plant Man jokes on Gene Day would have led me to the “Uh Oh!” moment I later encountered when I was told in no uncertain terms that the President of the Electric Company, James G. Harlow Junior was personally upset with something I had done.  I had learned my first year as a summer help at the coal-fired Power Plant in North Central Oklahoma that “One ‘Uh Oh’ wipes out all previous ‘Atta Boys’!”  I could tell by the way the Electric Supervisor, Tom Gibson’s ears were glowing red that this was considered a little more serious than I had first realized.

I have mentioned in previous posts that playing jokes on Gene Day was one of my favorite Power Plant Man Pastimes.    See the post, “Power Plant Humor and Joking With Gene Day“.    Also see, “Psychological Profile of a Power Plant Control Room Operator“.  My lunch breaks were usually consumed with learning more about how to program the Honeywell mainframe computer used by just about all the company processes that actually ran the company from payroll, to billing, to work orders and Inventory.  I figured that as I learned more about the computer system, the more elaborate jokes I would be able to play on Gene.

Already I had learned about the escape codes used by the large IBM printers that were used throughout the company at the time.  This allowed me to create graphic images on the printer as well as large bold letters.

IBM Dot Matrix Network Printer

IBM Dot Matrix Network Printer

Besides the telephone and inter-company mail, printers were the only other way to communicate to non-present Power Plant Men in 1989.  We had not yet been introduced to e-mail.  I was one of the few people in the company that had an e-mail address, and the only other person that I knew that I could write to was Craig Henry, a Corporate Engineer downtown.

 

Craig Henry.  Engineer and Gentleman

Craig Henry. Engineer and Gentleman

Much like the first time when I met Gene Day, when I first encountered Craig Henry, I could tell right away that he was a down-to-earth person that would shoot straight.  Craig probably wouldn’t remember this far into the future that I would reach out to him occasionally just to say “Hi” and to pick his brain about how the corporate IT infrastructure was setup.  I figured since he was one of the few people in the company that even knew what an e-mail address was at the time, he most likely had more knowledge about such things than the average person in Corporate Headquarters.

After finding out that Gene Day would go work out at the Rock Gym in Stillwater, Oklahoma after work, and I had played the joke on him with the notes from the private investigator, I used my knowledge of Printer Escape codes to write documents on the mainframe that when printed out would turn on the graphic commands on the printer so that I could print out pictures.  I don’t mean that I would have a saved picture that I would send to a printer like we might do today.  No.  I had to create these pictures one pixel at a time using commands in a UNIX document on the mainframe.  It was all codes that would not make sense to anyone that didn’t know the graphic commands of the IBM printers.

I had been teasing Gene Day about meeting up with a young “coed” from the University at the Gym each day.  I would do this by printing out messages on the Control Room printer by the the Shift Supervisor’s office when I knew that Gene Day was there filling in as the Shift Supervisor.  They were usually notes from someone that called herself “Bunny”.  Usually they were short notes or “love letters” from Bunny just saying something about how she enjoyed her time with Gene at the Gym.

At the bottom I would sign it “Bunny”  then under it, the printer would read the graphic commands and create a small Playboy Bunny symbol under the name.  At the end, the document would send a command that would put the printer back into the text mode.

Of course.  Whenever I walked into the control room shortly after, just to see how the precipitator was doing, Gene Day would confront me about the notes.  With a grin on his face he would say, “This isn’t funny!  What if my wife found one of these notes?”  — Like that was ever going to happen…. unless he was like me, and likes to save everything.

Note to Gene Day from Bunny

Note to Gene Day from Bunny (now she knows)

In order to create the bunny at the bottom I had to create the pixels in small blocks of 9 pixel patterns.  Here is the code I used to create the bunny:

See?  I save everything

See? I save everything

In the last couple of weeks I have written about how the Power Plant Men were introduced to the “Quality Process” (otherwise known as “Six Sigma”).  We had created teams with our crews and we met once each week to come up with Quality ideas.  By August, 1993, I had received my official Certificate Certifying that I had completed all the QuickStart training and was on my way to making a difference in the Power Plant World!

My Customer Service Team Certificate.  This made me official!

My Customer Service Team Certificate. This made me official!

So, what do these two events have in common and how did this lead the President of the Electric Company to send out a search warrant on a lowly Plant Electrician in North Central Oklahoma?  Well.  This is what happened…

First you have to remember that in 1993, the Internet was not easily accessible by the general public.  Company e-mail was still not a reality in our company.  We had dumb terminals and large IBM printers.  That was the extent of most employees interaction with a computer.  Each printer had a designation.  It was a four character ID beginning with a “P”.  So, the  printer in the Electric Shop Office might be…. P123.  I needed to know this number if I wanted to send  something to it.

At the time, the only thing people had to send to each other were requests for things from the mainframe systems that were used to run the company.  So, for instance, if you wanted to request some parts from the warehouse at our plant, we would send over a list of parts to the warehouse printer where Dick Dale and Darlene Mitchell would pick it up and go retrieve the parts.  So, the people that used the terminals and computers with mainframe emulators on them knew the most commonly used printer numbers in the plant.

If you wanted to send something to someone in Oklahoma City, or to the Power Plant in Muskogee, then you would have to call over there and ask the person what their Printer ID is so you can be sure you are sending your request to the appropriate printer.  Without e-mail, and any other form of computerized communication.  This was the only way at the time.

So, after our Customer Service Team was formed, we would meet once each week to brainstorm new ideas that would benefit the company.  Andy Tubbs was our team leader, as he was our foreman.

Andy Tubbs - True Power Plant Electrician

Andy Tubbs – True Power Plant Electrician

The other members of our Customer Service Team were Diana Brien, Scott Hubbard, Sonny Kendrick, Ben Davis and Gary Wehunt.  I haven’t properly introduced my bucket buddy Diana Brien in a post before.  I have recently obtained a photograph that I can share:

My Bucket Buddy Diana Brien

My Bucket Buddy Diana Brien

We were called bucket buddies because we carried tool buckets with us whenever we went to work on something.  They doubled as our stool and tripled as our trash can.

Thursday, July 15, 1993 during our Quality Brainstorming session, while we were pouring out ideas like…. “What if we changed out the street lights at the plant so that they would be different colors…. wouldn’t that help morale?….   and “How about if we wrapped fluorescent Christmas lights around the high voltage electric lines between here and Oklahoma City so that they could light up the night with colorful lights during the Christmas Season?”….. And other ingenious Brainstorming ideas that are bound to pull up an occasional brilliant idea….. well.  One such idea popped up!

I don’t remember which one of our brilliant brainstorming ideas conjured up this idea, but Andy Tubbs suddenly blurted out…. “What if we had the Printer IDs added as a column in the Corporate Directory? —  You see, each quarter we received an updated copy of the Corporate Phone Book.  It included the names and office phone numbers of all the Electric Company employees.  It also included their mail code.  So, if you wanted to send something through inter-company mail to them, you would know where to send it.  Our mail code was PP75.  That was the code for our power plant.

So, what if we added a column where we had the printer ID that each person would use for people to send printed requests, among other things?  This was Brilliant!  We could just make this proposal and send it downtown to Corporate Headquarters where it would be lost in the “mail”.  Or we could do more research to prove that it was a possible proposal that was really do-able.

So, I suggested….  Well… I can print a form out on every printer in the entire company requesting that they include all the names of all the people on that use that printer and mail it through inter-company mail back to me at PP75.  — I had recently uncovered a special printer command that allowed me to do this hidden away on the Honeywell mainframe.  So, we took a vote and it was decided that we would pursue this proposal.  I set to work on creating the form that I would send to every printer.  If we could not only send the proposal to the Communications department downtown, but also a list of everyone and their printers, the work would already have been done for them.

I wanted to send a real fancy letter because I had already created a header using the Quality print settings on the printers.  I had created a Company Logo that (I thought) ingeniously used the backspace command to create two words with one word on top of the other in the middle of a sentence….  Our company began as Oklahoma Gas and…..  in the logo, I wanted the word Gas to be on top of the word And as it was in our company logo in smaller letters than the others.  So… after playing around with it for a while, I created the logo and had it saved on the mainframe.

I know.  I was rotten to Gene Day.  Here is an example of the header with the "GAS AND" in the middle of the name

I know. I was rotten to Gene Day. Here is an example of the header with the “GAS AND” in the middle of the name.  Remember.  This is on an old IBM Dot Matrix printer using the High Quality setting

After attaching the header to the form, I included a message that told the person that discovered the form on the printer to add the names of all people who used the printer below and to send the form to Kevin Breazile at PP75.  As I mentioned.  In order to make the form look pretty, I turned on the Quality Print settings on the printer at the beginning of the document.  Like the story of the Sorcerer’s Apprentice….. I didn’t know a good way to turn off all the settings I changed to revert the printers back to their original settings.

I ran the command to send the document to every printer on the print server and away they went…. A copy printed out on the  printer in the Electric Shop office so I knew it was working.  Copies printed out on the other 12 printers at our plant.  They also printed out on the 500 other printers throughout Oklahoma.  — With the thought that “My work here is done.”  I went back to work repairing plant electric equipment.

The following Monday I had the day off.  When I returned to work on Tuesday, Denise Anson called me from the front office.  She said that I had a large stack of mail.  I thought, “Oh good!”  Results from our request on Thursday have arrived!  I hurried up to the front office.

When I entered the mail cubicle I was surprised to see how big the pile of envelopes were.  The stack of inter-company envelopes was over two feet high.  “Um…. Thanks….”  I said to Denise.  I picked up the stack and headed back to the Electric Shop to sort out the forms.

After opening the first few envelopes.  I suddenly came to an astonishing discovery.  Not only did the form print out on the large mainframe IBM printers used in office areas, it also had printed out on other types of printers….  I opened one envelope and found the form printed out on a “Work Order” printer.  The paper size was different than the standard paper size, and I hadn’t put a page feed at the end of the document, so, it had left the paper in the middle of the page…. “Uh Oh”.

My “Uh Oh” changed to “UH OH!” after opening a few more of the inter-company envelopes.  I found that the form had printed out on Pay Check Printers!  And Billing Printers!  “UH OH!”  quickly changed to “OH NO!”  When I read comments like “Under no circumstances print anything on this Printer Again!!!!” I realized I had really messed things up.  By changing the font size and the quality settings, the billing, payroll and work order printers all had to be manually reset and the jobs that printed out paychecks, customer bills and employee work orders had to be re-run!

After taking all the forms out of their envelopes, the stack of papers was over 4 inches thick, just to give you an idea about how many responses we had.

A couple of hours later, Tom Gibson called me to his office. “Uh Oh.”  (remember… One “uh oh” erases all previous “atta boy”s).  When I entered Tom’s office, I could tell that something was definitely wrong.  Like I mentioned earlier.  Tom’s ears were beet red…. and in case you don’t know what a beet looks like.  Here is one:

The same color of Tom Gibson's ears

The same color of Tom Gibson’s ears

Of course… I knew what this was all about, only I didn’t know yet, how Tom had found out about it….  Tom began by saying…. “Ron Kilman just received a call from James Harlow asking him who is Kevin Breazile and why is he printing something out on my printer?  Ron didn’t like the fact that he wasn’t aware that you had sent something to the President of the Company’s printer.

 

James G. Harlow Jr.

James G. Harlow Jr.

Sorry.  That’s the biggest picture I could find of James Harlow….

Um what could I say?  So, I said this…

Well.  This was a quality idea that our team had.  We wanted to collect the names of people that used each printer so that we could send in a proposal to have the printer ID added in the Corporate Directory.

I didn’t mention that Harlow’s Secretary had returned the form with all the people that used his computer as I had requested, because I knew that the President of the Electric Company was not asking because he was upset that I had printed something out on his printer.   No.  He had probably been told that the reason the bills were late being sent to the one million customers that month was because some kook had messed up their printers and the jobs had to be run over again causing the delay.  So, I thought it was best not to go down that route at this time…

So, I stuck with my story, which was the truth…. I had printed out the forms on all the printers as part of a quality idea by our CST. — I also didn’t mention that three years earlier, Tom had asked me to learn everything I could about the company computer, because he believe that the computer was going to be the wave of the future.

Even though Tom believed my explanation, he told me…. “Kevin, Ron never wants this to happen again, therefore, you are never to send anything out of this plant without Ron Kilman’s personal approval.  Is that clear?”

I replied to Tom that this was unreasonable.  I send things to other departments all the time.  I send Substation Inspection forms, and blueprint revisions and all sorts of other forms downtown all the time.  Ron Kilman wouldn’t want to waste his time approving all those things….

Tom thought about it and revised his statement…. “Then, don’t ever send out anything that isn’t part of your normal daily job without Ron’s approval first.”  — Ok.  I thought…. this works, since everything I do is part of my normal daily job…. Even printing out forms on all the printers in the company… since that was part of our normal “Quality Process” Customer Service Team activity….  So, I happily agreed.  And I left Tom’s office happy that I hadn’t joined the ranks of the unemployed.

That was one thing about working at the plant at this time.  As long as your heart was in the right place….  That is, you tried your best to keep the electricity humming through the electric lines…. then the chances of being fired for messing up, even as big of a mess up as this, most often didn’t end up by losing your job.

I sometimes think that this was my biggest mess up of all time… however…. after this episode was over… there was a part two to this story….. Believe it or not…. Someone else in the company was overjoyed about what I had just done.  They had been trying to do something similar for a long time, only to be told that it was impossible. — Doing the Impossible… I was good at that… Part two of this story is a story for another day…

Since this is a repost of this story, I have written part two, which you can read here:  “Printing Impossible Power Plant Fast News Post“.

A Chance for Power Plant Men to Show Their Quality

Originally posted June 21, 2014.  I updated dates and added some new things.

I don’t know if anyone of us knew what to expect  Wednesday morning January 13 , 1993 when we were told to go to a meeting in the break room that was going to take all day.  We were supposed to be in some kind of training.  Everyone at the plant was going to have to go through whatever training we were having.  Training like this always seemed funny to me for some reason.  I think it was because the hodgepodge of welders, mechanics, machinists, electricians and Instrument and Controls guys seemed so out of place in their coal-stained worn out old jeans and tee shirts.

I remember walking into the break room and sitting down across the table from Paul Mullon.  He was a new chemist at the time.  He had just started work that day.  We became friends right away.  Scott Hubbard, Paul and I were carpooling buddies.  He always looked a lot younger than he really was:

Paul Mullon when he was 90 years old

My favorite picture of Paul Mullon when he was 90 years old

See how much younger he looks?  — Oh.  That’s what I would always say about Gene Day because he was always as old as dirt.  Even when he was young.  Paul is only four years older than I am, but he still looks like he’s a lot younger than 70.  Even his great great grand daughter is saluting him in this photo.  Actually.  I love Paul Mullon as if he was my own brother.  He still looks younger than my younger brother who is four years younger than I am.  People used to think that he was his own daughter’s boyfriend.

When our training began, the plant manager at the coal-fired power plant in North Central Oklahoma, Ron Kilman came in and told us that we were going to learn about the “Quality Process”.  He explained that the Quality Process was a “Process”, not a “Program” like the “We’ve Got The Power Program” we had a few years earlier.  This meant that it wasn’t a one time thing that would be over any time soon.  The Quality Process was something that we will be able to use the rest of our lives.

At this point they handed out a blue binder to each of us.  The title on the front said, “QuickStart – Foundations of Team Development”.  A person from a company called “The Praxis Group”, Rick Olson from Utah (when I originally posted this last year, I couldn’t remember his name.  Then I found my Quality book and it had Rick’s name in it).  I had looked Rick Olson up to see if he was a member of CompuServe and there was Rick Olson from Ogden, Utah.  When I asked him if he was from Ogden, he told me he was from Provo, Utah.

One of the first things Rick asked us to do was to break up into teams of four or five and we were asked to come up with 3 facts about ourselves.  Two of which were true and one that was false.  Then our team mates were asked to vote on which fact they thought was the false one.  The only one I remember from that game was that Ben Brandt had dinner with the Bill Clinton on one occasion when he was Governor of Arkansas.  — At least, I think that was what it was…  Maybe that was the fact that was false.

The purpose of this game was to get to know each other….  Well….  We had all been working with each other for the past 15 years, so we all knew each other pretty good by that time.  Except for someone new like Paul.  I think my false fact was that I had hitchhiked from Columbia, Missouri to New Orleans when I was in college.  — That was an easy one.  Everyone knew that I had hitchhiked to Holly Springs National Forest in Mississippi, not New Orleans.

Anyway, after we knew each other better, we learned about the different roles that members of our teams would have.  Our “Quality” teams were going to be our own crews.  Each team was going to have a Leader, a Facilitator, a Recorder, and if needed (though we never really needed one), a Logistics person.  The Logistics person was just someone that found a place where the team could meet.  We always just met in the Electric Shop office.  I wanted to be “Facilitator”.

We learned about the importance of creating Ground Rules for our Quality Meetings.  One of the Ground rules we had was to be courteous to each other.  Another was to “Be willing to change” (I didn’t think this really belonged as a “Ground Rule”.  I thought of it more as a “Nice to have” given the present company).  Another Ground Rule was to “Discuss – Don’t Lecture”.  One that I thought was pretty important was about “Confidentiality”.  We had a ground rule that essentially said, “What happens in a team meeting… Stays in the team meeting.”

I recently found a list of the Quality teams that were formed at our plant.  Here is a list of the more interesting names and which team it was:  Barrier Reliefs (that was our team — Andy Tubbs team).  Rolaids (Ted Holdges team).  Elmore and the Problem Solvers (Stanley Elmore’s team… of course).  Spit and Whittle (Gerald Ferguson’s Team).  Foster’s Mission (Charles Foster’s team).  Sooner Elite (Engineer’s team).  Boiler Pukes (Cleve’s Smith’s Welding crew I believe).  Quality Trek (Alan Kramer’s Team).  Designing Women (Linda Dallas’s Team).  There were many more.

I think all the Power Plant Quality Teams had the same “Mission Statement”.  It was “To Meet or Exceed our Customer’s Expectations”.  I remember that the person that was teaching all this stuff to us was really good at motivating us to be successful.  As we stepped through the “QuickStart” training manual, the Power Plant He-men were beginning to see the benefit of the tools we were learning.  There were those that would have nothing to do with anything called “Quality”, just because… well…. it was a matter of principle to be against things that was not their own idea.

Later they gave us a the main Quality binder that we used for our team meetings:

Our Quality Manual

Our Quality Manual

When we began learning about the different quality tools that we could use to solve problems, I recognized them right away.  I hadn’t learned any “Quality Process” like Six Sigma at that time, but I was about to graduate from Loyola University in New Orleans in a couple of months with a Masters of Religious Education (MRE) where I had focused my courses on Adult Education.  Half of my classes were about Religious topics, and the other half was about how to teach adults.  The same methods  were used that we learned about in this training.

It just happened that I had spent the previous three years learning the same various quality tools that the Power Plant Men were being taught.  We were learning how to identify barriers to helping our customers and breaking them down one step at at time.  We also learned how to prioritize our efforts to break down the barriers by looking at where we had control and who we were trying to serve… such as ourselves or others.  I remember we tried to stay away from things that were “Self Serving.”

We learned how to do something called a “Barrier Walk”.  This was where we would walk around the plant almost as if we were looking at it for the first time to find barriers we hadn’t noticed before.  We also learned how to brainstorm ideas by just saying whatever came to our minds no matter how silly they may sound without anyone putting anyone down for a dumb idea.  Rick called each barrier that your customer encountered a “SPLAT”.  Our goal was to reduce “SPLAT”s.  I think at one point we even discussed having stickers that said “SPLAT” on them that we could put on barriers when we located them.

When we implemented a quality idea, we were taught to do a “Things Gone Right, Things Gone Wrong” exercise so that we could improve future projects.  This had two columns.  On one side you listed all the good things (which was generally fairly long), and on the other, all the things that went wrong (which was a much shorter list).  This was done so that we could consider how to avoid the things that didn’t work well.

We learned how to make proposals and turn them into a team called “The Action Team”.  I was on this team as the Facilitator for the first 6 months.  Sue Schritter started out as our Action Team Leader.  The other Action team members in the beginning were:  Richard Allen, John Brien, Jim Cave, Robert Grover, Phil Harden, Alan Hetherington, Louise Kalicki, Bruce Klein, Johnnie Keys, Kerry Lewallen, Ron Luckey and George Pepple.

The Power Plant Men learned that there were five S’s that would cause a proposal to fail.

One of those was “Secrecy”.  If you are going to propose something that affects others, then you have to include them in the decision making up front or else even if you think it’s a great idea, others may have legitimate reasons for not implementing it, and you would have wasted your time.

The second was “Simplicity”.  It follows along with Secrecy in that if you just threw the idea together without considering all the others that will be affected by the change, then the proposal would be sent back to you for further study.

The third was “Subjectivity”.  This happens when something just sounds like a good idea.  All the facts aren’t considered.  The solutions you may be proposing may not be the best, or may not even really deal with the root of a problem.  You might even be trying to solve a problem that doesn’t really exist, or is such a small problem that it isn’t worth the effort.

The fourth was “Superficiality”.  This happens when the outcomes from the proposal are not carefully considered.  Things like, what are the long term effects.  Or, What is the best and worst case of this proposal…  Those kind of things are not considered.

The last one is “Self-Serving”.  If you are doing this just because it benefits only your own team and no one else, then you aren’t really doing much to help your customers.  Most likely it may even be causing others an inconvenience for your own benefit.

I know this is becoming boring as I list the different things we learned that week in 1993.  Sorry about that.  I will cut it short by not talking about the “Empowerment Tool” that we learned about, or even the importance of Control Charts and go right to the best tool of them all.  One that Power Plant Men all over can relate to.  It is called the “Fishbone Diagram”.

Fishbone Diagram

Fishbone Diagram

There are few things that Power Plant Men like better than Fishing, so when we began to learn about the Fishbone diagram I could see that even some of the most stubborn skeptics couldn’t bring themselves to say something bad about the Fishbone diagram.  Some were even so enthusiastic that they were over-inflating the importance (and size) of their Fishbone diagrams!  — This along with the Cause and Effect chart were very useful tools in finding the root cause of a problem (or “barrier” as we referred to them).

All in all, this was terrific training.  A lot of good things were done as a result to make things more efficient at the plant because of it.  For the next year, the culture at the plant was being molded into a quality oriented team.  This worked well at our particular plant because the Power Plant Men employed there already took great pride in their work.  So, the majority of the crews fell behind the effort.  I know of only one team at the coal yard where the entire team decided to have nothing to do with it.

When training was done, I told Rick that I thought that his company would really benefit by having a presence on the Internet.  As I mentioned in last week’s post “Turning the Tables on a Power Plant Interloper”  During this time the World Wide Web did not have browsers and modems did not have the bandwidth at this point, so CompuServe was the only service available for accessing the Internet for the regular population.

I asked Rick if he had heard about CompuServe.  He said he had not heard of it.  I told him that I thought the Internet was going to be the place where training would be available for everyone eventually and he would really benefit by starting a “Quality” Forum on CompuServe, because there wasn’t anything like that on the Internet at the time.  I remember the puzzled look he gave me as he was leaving.  I realized he didn’t have a clue what I was talking about.  Few people knew about the Internet in those days….

I have a number of stories about how the Quality Process thrived at the Power Plant over the next year that I will share.  I promise those stories will not be as boring as this one.

Power Plant Carpooling Adventures With Grant Harned — Repost

Originally Posted on November 17, 2012:

Louise Gates seemed reluctant to approach me to ask if I wanted to make a donation for flowers for Grant Harned’s funeral.  Of course I did.  He was a good friend of mine.  We had many carpooling adventures before he left his job as the plant receptionist to move to Tulsa, Oklahoma where he died a little more than a year later in May 1984 in an automobile accident.

Thomas “Grant” Harned had obtained a degree in business from Oklahoma State University before accepting the job at the coal-fired power plant in North Central Oklahoma.  He told me that he thought that once he had his foot in the door that he would be able to advance up the HR chain until he worked his way into a business department downtown at Corporate Headquarters.  Downtown is synonymous for Oklahoma City.

Like many struggling new Power Plant men such as Ed Shiever, Dale Hull and others, Thomas lived in a modest student rental apartment near campus.  Grant lived on West Miller Avenue just off of Main Street in Stillwater.  Soon after I had become a janitor and the summer helps I had been carpooling with had left, I began carpooling with Grant.

Grant was a tall thin man with sandy hair and a moustache that reminded me a lot of Gary McCain (also known as Stick).  I have a picture of him around here somewhere that I found many years after his death when we were cleaning out the office that Louise Gates (now Kalicki) had obtained upon becoming the supervisor over HR.  It is a picture of him sitting at the receptionist desk.

Louise gave me a picture of myself that had been taken when I was a janitor, and as I filed through the other pictures I found Grant’s photo.   I knew no one else at the plant would want the picture as few knew him or even remembered him by that time.  So I took it as well.  Some day when I find where I have placed those pictures, I will post them. (I found the picture since I the original post).

Grant Harned answering the phone at the plant while he worked as the receptionist.

Grant Harned answering the phone at the plant while he worked as the receptionist.

As I mentioned, Grant was just out of the Business College at OSU and he was fired up, ready to make a difference.  He had all sorts of ideas that he shared with me about how the plant and the company business processes could be improved.

He reminds me now of myself years later when I was carpooling with Scott Hubbard and Toby O’Brien and how I would talk about having smart electricity instead of the same dumb electricity we have had for the past 100 years.  Except that Grant’s ideas were about business processes, where my ideas were about electrons moving through a conductor.

For Power Plant Men, carpooling is a way of getting into other Power Plant Men’s minds and understanding them from the inside out.  Each day while driving back and forth from the plant you are basically locked into a confined space with one or more other individuals with nothing but your thoughts, or NPR or in the case of Dale Hull and Ricky Daniels… Beer.

In the case of Grant Harned, he soon became frustrated.  He had graduated from school and wanted to make a difference somehow.  And he wanted it to happen right away.  He would tell Jack Ballard his ideas about how he thought things could change, and each time Jack would shoot it down.

I’m not saying that Grant had great business changing ideas that would change the way Power Plants all over the country operated.  He just wanted to be listened to, and he didn’t understand that there were built-in reasons why we did it the way we did.  The most important was that “We had been doing it this way for 35 years, and we’re not going to change it now.”

For some reason that rubbed Grant the wrong way.  Maybe because he couldn’t help thinking outside the box.  He obviously had trouble understanding the benefit of doing something the same way for 35 years.  I guess he must have missed the class where “because I said so” was a solid business case.

Anyway.  It is true that Power Plant business processes before Grant’s time and for a while after, were based on doing things the same way it has always been done.  I suppose that is why electricity for all those years was the same boring thing…. 60 cycles (60 Hz or 50 Hz in Europe) Alternating Current.  Regular Sine wave, perfectly generated.  Each wave identical to each other.  — But I’ll talk about electricity later.  At this time I was still a janitor.

Sine wave shows how the voltage (and current) changes in Alternating Current electricity

Grant finally decided that he was going to look for another job because he realized that he didn’t have a future at the power plant.  He had been trained as a business person and there was little opportunity to display and cultivate his new found skills at a power plant in the middle of the countryside where everyone was content with the way things were.

Before he left, he gave me some cassette tapes that he used to play on the way to and from work.  I kept them for years until I had worn them out listening to them in my car.  Two of the tapes were The Rolling Stones, one of his favorite bands.

I said goodbye to Grant when he left, but I never forgot him.  Each year on All Souls Day (November 2), I remember him and David Hankins.  He, like most of the men I have carpooled with over the years was like a brother to me.  Those that weren’t brothers, were fathers.

It didn’t occur to me until after I first wrote the original post that years later, I too went to Oklahoma State University while I was working at the plant to obtain a degree from the Business College, Spears School of Business.  I wonder if Grant was looking down giving me a thumbs up as I walked to the podium to get my diploma.

I mentioned that I don’t know where I placed his Power Plant picture, but I do have other pictures (before I recently found it):

High School Picture of Grant Harned

Grant Harned looking more like I remember him

Evidently someone else remembers Grant as I do.  I found these picture of him on a memorial site online.  There is a comment there that says this of Grant:  “Was known in school and by friends as Grant. He had a great sense of humor and would always make you laugh.”

I agreed with Grant.  He really didn’t belong at the power plant.  Power Plant life and culture at the time was not geared toward “continuous improvement” and Six Sigma.  It was about coming home safely at night to your family and doing a good days worth of work and having something to show for it.  He was young and ambitious.

I cherish the time I spent with Grant driving to and from work.  I remember many of the conversations that we had.  Many of them philosophical in nature.  Some having to do with the regular questions people have about life and God.  I know that he was being drawn toward something greater, and in the end I pray that he found it.

Power Plant Customer Service Team Gone Wild

I never would have guessed that playing Power Plant Man jokes on Gene Day would have led me to the “Uh Oh!” moment I later encountered when I was told in no uncertain terms that the President of the Electric Company, James G. Harlow Junior was personally upset with something I had done.  I had learned my first year as a summer help at the coal-fired Power Plant in North Central Oklahoma that “One ‘Uh Oh’ wipes out all previous ‘Atta Boys’!”  I could tell by the way the Electric Supervisor, Tom Gibson’s ears were glowing red that this was considered a little more serious than I had first realized.

I have mentioned in previous posts that playing jokes on Gene Day was one of my favorite Power Plant Man Pastimes.    See the post, “Power Plant Humor and Joking With Gene Day“.    Also see, “Psychological Profile of a Power Plant Control Room Operator“.  My lunch breaks were usually consumed with learning more about how to program the Honeywell mainframe computer used by just about all the company processes that actually ran the company from payroll, to billing, to work orders and Inventory.  I figured that as I learned more about the computer system, the more elaborate jokes I would be able to play on Gene.

Already I had learned about the escape codes used by the large IBM printers that were used throughout the company at the time.

IBM Dot Matrix Network Printer

IBM Dot Matrix Network Printer

Besides the telephone and inter-company mail, printers were the only other way to communicate to non-present Power Plant Men in 1989.  We had not yet been introduced to e-mail.  I was one of the few people in the company that had an e-mail address, and the only other person that I knew that I could write to was Craig Henry, a Corporate Engineer downtown.

 

Craig Henry.  Engineer and Gentleman

Craig Henry. Engineer and Gentleman

Much like the first time when I met Gene Day, when I first encountered Craig Henry, I could tell right away that he was a down-to-earth person that would shoot straight.  Craig probably wouldn’t remember this far into the future that I would reach out to him occasionally just to say “Hi” and to pick his brain about how the corporate IT infrastructure was setup.  I figured since he was one of the few people in the company that even knew what an e-mail address was at the time, he most likely had more knowledge about such things than the average person in Corporate Headquarters.

After finding out that Gene Day would go work out at the Rock Gym in Stillwater, Oklahoma after work, and I had played the joke on him with the notes from the private investigator, I used my knowledge of Printer Escape codes to write documents on the mainframe that when printed out would turn on the graphic commands on the printer so that I could print out pictures.  I don’t mean that I would have a saved picture that I would send to a printer like we might do today.  No.  I had to create these pictures one pixel at a time using commands in a UNIX document on the mainframe.  It was all codes that would not make sense to anyone that didn’t know the graphic commands of the IBM printers.

I had been teasing Gene Day about meeting up with a young “coed” from the University at the Gym each day.  I would do this by printing out messages on the Control Room printer by the the Shift Supervisor’s office when I knew that Gene Day was there filling in as the Shift Supervisor.  They were usually notes from someone that called herself “Bunny”.  Usually they were short notes or “love letters” from Bunny just saying something about how she enjoyed her time with Gene at the Gym.

At the bottom I would sign it “Bunny”  then under it, the printer would read the graphic commands and create a small Playboy Bunny symbol under the name.  At the end, the document would send a command that would put the printer back into the text mode.

Of course.  Whenever I walked into the control room shortly after, just to see how the precipitator was doing, Gene Day would confront me about the notes.  With a grin on his face he would say, “This isn’t funny!  What if my wife found one of these notes?”  — Like that was ever going to happen…. unless he was like me, and like to save everything.

In the last couple of weeks I have written about how the Power Plant Men were introduced to the “Quality Process” (otherwise known as “Six Sigma”).  We had created teams with our crews and we met once each week to come up with Quality ideas.  In August, 1993, I had received my official Certificate Certifying that I had completed all the QuickStart training and was on my way to making a difference in the Power Plant World!

My Customer Service Team Certificate.  This made me official!

My Customer Service Team Certificate. This made me official!

So, what do these two events have in common and how did this lead the President of the Electric Company to send out a search warrant on a lowly Plant Electrician in North Central Oklahoma?  Well.  This is what happened…

First you have to remember that in 1993, the Internet was not easily accessible by the general public.  Company e-mail was still not a reality in our company.  We had dumb terminals and large IBM printers.  That was the extent of most employees interaction with a computer.  Each printer had a designation.  It was a four character ID beginning with a “P”.  So, the  printer in the Electric Shop Office might be…. P123.  I needed to know this number if I wanted to send  something to it.

At the time, the only thing people had to send to each other were requests for things from the mainframe systems that were used to run the company.  So, for instance, if you wanted to request some parts from the warehouse at our plant, we would send over a list of parts to the warehouse printer where Dick Dale and Darlene Mitchell would pick it up and go retrieve the parts.  So, the people that used the terminals and computers with mainframe emulators on them knew the most commonly used printer numbers in the plant.

If you wanted to send something to someone in Oklahoma City, or to the Power Plant in Muskogee, then you would have to call over there and ask the person what their Printer ID is so you can be sure you are sending your request to the appropriate computer.  Without e-mail, and any other form of computerized communication.  This was the only way at the time.

So, after our Customer Service Team was formed, we would meet once each week to brainstorm new ideas that would benefit the company.  Andy Tubbs was our team leader, as he was our foreman.

Andy Tubbs - True Power Plant Electrician

Andy Tubbs – True Power Plant Electrician

The other members of our Customer Service Team were Diana Brien, Scott Hubbard, Sonny Kendrick, Ben Davis and Gary Wehunt.  I haven’t properly introduced my bucket buddy Diana Brien in a post before.  I have recently obtained a photograph that I can share:

My Bucket Buddy Diana Brien

My Bucket Buddy Diana Brien

We were called bucket buddies because we carried tool buckets with us whenever we went to work on something.  They doubled as our stool and tripled as our trash can.

Thursday, October 14, 1993 during our Quality Brainstorming session, while we were pouring out ideas like…. “What if we changed out the street lights at the plant so that they would be different colors…. wouldn’t that help morale?….   and “How about if we wrapped fluorescent Christmas lights around the high voltage electric lines between here and Oklahoma City so that they could light up the night with colorful lights during the Christmas Season?”….. And other ingenious Brainstorming ideas that are bound to pull up an occasional brilliant idea….. well.  One such idea popped up!

I don’t remember which one of our brilliant brainstorming ideas conjured up this idea, but Andy Tubbs suddenly blurted out…. “What if we had the Printer IDs added as a column in the Corporate Directory? —  You see, each quarter we received an updated copy of the Corporate Phone Book.  It included the names and phone numbers of all the Electric Company employees.  It also included their mail code.  So, if you wanted to send something through inter-company mail to them, you would know where to send it.  Our mail code was PP75.  That was the code for our power plant.

So, what if we added a column where we had the printer ID that each person would use for people to send printed requests, among other things?  This was Brilliant!  We could just make this proposal and send it downtown to Corporate Headquarters where it would be lost in the “mail”.  Or we could do more research to prove that it was a possible proposal that was really doable.

So, I suggested….  Well… I can print a form out on every printer in the entire company requesting that they include all the names of all the people on that use that printer and mail it through inter-company mail back to me at PP75.  — I had recently uncovered a special printer command that allowed me to do this hidden away on the Honeywell mainframe.  So, we took a vote and it was decided that we would pursue this proposal.  I set to work on creating the form that I would send to every printer.  If we could not only send the proposal to the Communications department downtown, but also a list of everyone and their printers, the work would already have been done for them.

I wanted to send a real fancy letter because I had already created a header using the Quality print settings on the printers.  I had created a Company Logo that (I thought) ingeniously used the backspace command to create two words with one word on top of the other in the middle of a sentence….  Our company began as Oklahoma Gas and…..  in the logo, I wanted the word Gas to be on top of the word And as it was in our company logo in smaller letters than the others.  So… after playing around with it for a while, I created the logo and had it saved on the mainframe.

After attaching the header to the form, I included a message that told the person that discovered the form on the printer to add the names of all people who used the printer below and to send the form to Kevin Breazile at PP75.  As I mentioned.  In order to make the form look pretty, I turned on the Quality Print settings on the printer at the beginning of the document.  Like the story of the Sorcerer’s Apprentice….. I didn’t know a good way to turn off all the settings I changed to revert the printers back to their original settings.

I ran the command to send the document to every printer on the print server and away they went…. A copy printed out on the  printer in the Electric Shop office so I knew it was working.  Copies printed out on the other 12 printers at our plant.  They also printed out on the 500 other printers throughout Oklahoma.  — With the thought that “My work here is done.”  I went back to work repairing plant electric equipment.

The following Monday was my birthday, so in normal Power Plant Fashion, I had the day off.  When I returned to work on Tuesday, Denise Anson called me from the front office.  She said that I had a large stack of mail.  I thought, “Oh good!”  Results from our request on Thursday have arrived!  I hurried up to the front office.

When I entered the mail cubicle I was surprised to see how big the pile of envelopes were.  The stack of inter-company envelopes was over two feet high.  “Um…. Thanks….”  I said to Denise.  I picked up the stack and headed back to the Electric Shop to sort out the forms.

After opening the first few envelopes.  I suddenly came to an astonishing discovery.  Not only did the form print out on the large mainframe IBM printers used in office areas, it also had printed out on other types of printers….  I opened one envelope and found the form printed out on a “Work Order” printer.  The paper size was different than the standard paper size, and I hadn’t put a page feed at the end of the document, so, it had left the paper in the middle of the page…. “Uh Oh”.

My “Uh Oh” changed to “UH OH!” after opening a few more of the inter-company envelopes.  I found that the form had printed out on Pay Check Printers!  And Billing Printers!  “UH OH!”  quickly changed to “OH NO!”  When I read comments like “Under no circumstances print anything on this Printer Again!!!!” I realized I had really messed things up.  By changing the font size and the quality settings, the billing, payroll and work order printers all had to be manually reset and the jobs that printed out paychecks, customer bills and employee work orders had to be re-run!

After taking all the forms out of their envelopes, the stack of papers was over 4 inches thick, just to give you an idea about how many responses we had.

A couple of hours later, Tom Gibson called me to his office. “Uh Oh.”  (remember… One “uh oh” erases all previous “atta boy”s).  When I entered Tom’s office, I could tell that something was definitely wrong.  Like I mentioned earlier.  Tom’s ears were beet red…. and in case you don’t know what a beet looks like.  Here is one:

The same color of Tom Gibson's ears

The same color of Tom Gibson’s ears

Of course… I knew what this was all about, only I didn’t know yet, how Tom had found out about it….  Tom began by saying…. “Ron Kilman just received a call from James Harlow asking him who is Kevin Breazile and why is he printing something out on my printer?  Ron didn’t like the fact that he wasn’t aware that you had sent something to the President of the Company’s printer.

 

James G. Harlow Jr.

James G. Harlow Jr.

Sorry.  That’s the biggest picture I could find of James Harlow….

Um what could I say?  So, I said this…

Well.  This was a quality idea that our team had.  We wanted to collect the names of people that used each printer so that we could send in a proposal to have the printer ID added in the Corporate Directory.

I didn’t mention that Harlow’s Secretary had returned the form with all the people that used his computer as I had requested, because I knew that the President of the Electric Company was not asking because he was upset that I had printed something out on his printer.   No.  He had probably been told that the reason the bills were late being sent to the one million customers that month was because some kook had messed up their printers and the jobs had to be run over again causing the delay.  So, I thought it was best not to go that route…

So, I stuck with my story, which was the truth…. I had printed out the forms on all the printers as part of a quality idea by our CST. — I also didn’t mention that three years earlier, Tom had asked me to learn everything I could about the company computer, because he believe that the computer was going to be the wave of the future.

Even though Tom believed my explanation, he told me…. “Kevin, Ron never wants this to happen again, therefore, you are never to send anything out of this plant without Ron Kilman’s personal approval.  Is that clear?”

I replied to Tom that this was unreasonable.  I send things to other departments all the time.  I send Substation Inspection forms, and blueprint revisions and all sorts of other forms downtown all the time.  Ron Kilman wouldn’t want to waste his time approving all those things….

Tom thought about it and revised his statement…. “Then, don’t ever send out anything that isn’t part of your normal daily job without Ron’s approval first.”  — Ok.  I thought…. this works, since everything I do is part of my normal daily job…. Even printing out forms on all the printers in the company… since that was part of our normal “Quality Process” Customer Service Team activity….  So, I happily agreed.  And I left Tom’s office happy that I hadn’t joined the ranks of the unemployed.

That was one thing about working at the plant at this time.  As long as your heart was in the right place….  That is, you tried your best to keep the electricity humming through the electric lines…. then the chances of being fired for messing up, even as big of a mess up as this, most often didn’t end up by losing your job.

I sometimes think that this was my biggest mess up of all time… however…. after this episode was over… there was a part two to this story….. Believe it or not…. Someone else in the company was overjoyed about what I had just done.  They had been trying to do something similar for a long time, only to be told that it was impossible. — Doing the Impossible… I was good at that… Part two of this story is a story for another day…